Repository system in Linux
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    Repository system in Linux

    I am new to linux and new to fedora as well. I am a windows users who is trying to migrate.

    As you can understand I am comfortable against programs but not with repository systems. So, I am trying to understand it. How should I know which repository to install? If a program needs it. Should I type 'dnf search'? If anybody guide me to at tutorial or something then it will be really helpful. I am looking for something that will clear my confusion and queries regarding repositories.

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    Re: Repository system in Linux

    Fedora is "FOSS" (Free & Open Source Software) so all those are already included in the repositories that were part of your installation. However, there's some packages (programs) that you might want that are NOT "FOSS", so we also suggest you set up the RPMFusion repositories, both 'free' and 'non-free', to have access to just about all that's available for Fedora.

    All these repositories have been proven time and time again to work well with each other and completely trustworthy. With the included repos and the RPMfusion repos, you should be fine for almost any situation.

    Now then, if you poke around a bit in your installation, you might come across some included repos, such as 'updates-testing', which are disabled by design. These should not be enabled unless there's an unusual problem, and then check with us before playing. You can mess things up if you're not careful.
    Linux & Beer - That TOTALLY Computes!
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    Re: Repository system in Linux

    Listen to bob. Also keep in mind that you may sometimes find yourself using using third party repositories, or installing am rpm directly, as with something like Skype.

    Most things can be easily installed via dnf, and if you're having trouble finding something you can always use "search" or "whatprovides". And if you're still having trouble you can always come back and ask.

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    Re: Repository system in Linux

    Quote Originally Posted by bob
    Fedora is "FOSS" (Free & Open Source Software) so all those are already included in the repositories that were part of your installation. However, there's some packages (programs) that you might want that are NOT "FOSS", so we also suggest you set up the RPMFusion repositories, both 'free' and 'non-free', to have access to just about all that's available for Fedora.

    All these repositories have been proven time and time again to work well with each other and completely trustworthy. With the included repos and the RPMfusion repos, you should be fine for almost any situation.

    Now then, if you poke around a bit in your installation, you might come across some included repos, such as 'updates-testing', which are disabled by design. These should not be enabled unless there's an unusual problem, and then check with us before playing. You can mess things up if you're not careful.
    Hello Admin,

    How many repos are there present in Fedora by default?

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    Re: Repository system in Linux

    Here's how to tell. Open a terminal and type (or copy/paste) ls /etc/yum.repos.d That gives you a list ("ls" calls up the list) of all the installed repos.

    Now, let's see what's what!

    For fun, type less /etc/yum.repos.d/fedora.repo That opens fedora.repo and you'll see that the section "[fedora]" is enabled "enabled=1", while "[fedora-debug-info]" and "[fedora-source]" are not enabled "enabled=0" . (type "q" to quit, when done).

    Now, if you want to explore some more, you can check out the status of the others the same way and, don't worry, you're just looking, not changing things.
    Linux & Beer - That TOTALLY Computes!
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    Re: Repository system in Linux

    When I first began to use linux, I was amazed at how elegant it was. In Windows, it had been like shopping in a city. For different things, you ran all over town, searching for them, then installing them. There was sometimes the fear that you were downloading malware with some funky program that who-knows-who had created.

    With linux, it was like Walmart (or Amazon); everything you needed was in one store and you just 'pick and choose' which ones you wanted and they were delivered right to you! No question about malware; everything in the repos had been checked and re-checked and everything was designed to work together harmoniously.
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    Re: Repository system in Linux

    Quote Originally Posted by bob
    When I first began to use linux, I was amazed at how elegant it was. In Windows, it had been like shopping in a city. For different things, you ran all over town, searching for them, then installing them. There was sometimes the fear that you were downloading malware with some funky program that who-knows-who had created.

    With linux, it was like Walmart (or Amazon); everything you needed was in one store and you just 'pick and choose' which ones you wanted and they were delivered right to you! No question about malware; everything in the repos had been checked and re-checked and everything was designed to work together harmoniously.
    Isn't wonderful to discover Linux, and this Linux community? It is almost the same feeling as discovering nice new friends.
    Leslie in Montreal

    Interesting web sites list
    http://forums.fedoraforum.org/showth...40#post1697840

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    Re: Repository system in Linux

    Hi all. You forgot Flathub !!

    Flathub very important repositories that offer generic packages (flatpak format) for every Linux distro. However, it is a Fedora project & being integrated with Fedora by design.

    Flathub applications have the credit of being SANDBOX BY DEFAULT !

    You may see many applications available to you from 2 sources: official Fedora or RPMFusion repositories (being rpm. format) OR Flathub (being flapak. format).

    From my side I recommend to use Flatpaks packages that available in Flathub as following:

    1) use flatpak to install applications that already NOT AVAILABLE in official Fedora repositories or RPMFusion repositories,

    2) if an application is available in both Fedora/RPMFusion repositories & Flathub & being completely open source with all it's dependencies also being open source & this application not dangerous (I mean by "not dangerous WineHQ that can run malware), then it is better to use rpm package from Fedora/RPMFusion rather than flatpak,

    3) if an application is available in both Fedora/RPMFusion & in Flathub & being closed source, like Skype or Adobe Flash player for ex, then it is highly recommended to use flatpak from Flathub rather than rpm from Fedora/RPMFusion, because 2nd will make this closed source package to root your OS while flatpak will being sandbox by default,

    4) if an application is available in both Fedora/RPMFusion & Flathub & being open source but use closed source dependencies like VLC (media player) & Shotcut (video editor), then it is better to use flatpak (more secure due to default sandbox),

    5) if game have huge size data file being for ex 800 MB or 1 GB or 2 GB & you live in country with slow Internet like me, then flatpak better because it will not included in total download size when you upgrade your Fedora OS to next version of Fedora,

    6) if application of huge size though being open source with open source dependencies & being not dangerous, & you live when Internet is slow, then it is better to use flatpak for same cause in point (5) above. This applied for LibreOffice. I release 444 MB from download size of next system upgrade when I deleted system LO & install LO as flatpak. Yes, I lose about 200 MB from my disk space but LO will not included in system upgrade further,

    7) if you like to obtain last version of an application instantly when released then flatpak better. Beware flatpak show labelled "release activity" in GNOME software to achieve this goal. This applied to LO & Shotcut & GIMP,

    8) in case of dangreous application by design like WineHQ that could run a virus or other malware on your system. Here is it highly recommended to use flatpak version due to default sandbox.Currently Wine not available as a Wine in flatpak format, but it is available as Pheonicis,

    9) lastly when you need to install application designed for DE other than your default DE. Example if you are on Cinnamon DE but in need for Okular which designed for KDE DE. Here it is better to use flatpak to avoid installing KDE DE dependencies on you default DE.
    Fedora 28 X64 bit Cinnamon edition on Lenovo ThinkPad e550 with Intel core i7 5500 CPU @ 2.40 GH X 2, RAM = 8 GB, HHD = 1 TB, Hybrid VGA (Intel Corporation HD Graphic 5500 + Radeon R7 M265 2GB)

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    Re: Repository system in Linux

    User808, that's your opinion, but we have a NEW user who's concerned about repos. You might think it's great, and it might be a wonderful addition at some future date, but it can be dangerous to believe that every 3rd. party repository is safe and secure. Almost every normal user is just fine with the addition of just RPMFusion for all their needs. I would certainly not recommend adding Flathub at this time.

    If you want to read about it and consider it, here's a link . You might find the comments interesting.


    Edit: This is a quote from their site -
    Note: Flathub is a third party repository of software that is not in the Fedora distribution. As such the Flathub repo may have different licensing and other requirements that differ from Fedora.
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    Re: Repository system in Linux

    Quote Originally Posted by bob
    User808, that's your opinion, but we have a NEW user who's concerned about repos. You might think it's great, and it might be a wonderful addition at some future date, but it can be dangerous to believe that every 3rd. party repository is safe and secure. Almost every normal user is just fine with the addition of just RPMFusion for all their needs. I would certainly not recommend adding Flathub at this time.

    If you want to read about it and consider it, here's a link . You might find the comments interesting.


    Edit: This is a quote from their site -
    I don't want any repositories from third party services. Atleast not now. I am totally new to linux. I am going to stick with the repos which Fedora already has.

    Say, if I am trying to install LAMP. Then all I have to do is to 'dnf install httpd', 'dnf install mysql' or 'mariadb', 'dnf install php'. And dnf which is the package manager here will take care of all the dependencies.

    Okay so 'dnf' my package manager will take care of all the related dependencies, right?

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    Re: Repository system in Linux

    That's right. Have fun and don't forget us if you have questions.
    Linux & Beer - That TOTALLY Computes!
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