amd 2700x cooler / heatsink
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  1. #1
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    amd 2700x cooler / heatsink

    I am unboxing and installing the AMD 2700x in the motherboard.
    The heat-sink(cooler) has a sticky pad on the copper mating surface.
    Do I peel that sticky item and apply Artic silver paste, or is that
    sticky pad impregnated with heatsink material.
    a) no extra Artic silver heatsink paste.
    b) leave the pad on the copper contact area and apply the paste to the pad
    c) Remove the pad and apply heatsink to the copper contact area.

    What is the answer please.

    The AMD manual does not say what to do.
    Leslie in Montreal

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  2. #2
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    Re: amd 2700x cooler / heatsink

    do not peel the sticky pad, that is the thermal compound, also do not add anything else to it

  3. #3
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    Re: amd 2700x cooler / heatsink

    Quote Originally Posted by antikythera
    do not peel the sticky pad, that is the thermal compound, also do not add anything else to it
    Thank you Antikythera, I got it.

    I first searched Utube for the answer, but they showed what had to be done for the 1700x, which was the only demo I discovered.
    Leslie in Montreal

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  4. #4
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    Re: amd 2700x cooler / heatsink

    Concur ... But ... You really really really have to be careful when trying to remove the cooler off the CPU when you need to. It is sticky!

  5. #5
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    Re: amd 2700x cooler / heatsink

    indeed, when it has been heat cycled it is strong enough to rip the CPU out of the socket if you are heavy handed during removal which can of course damage it.

  6. #6
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    Re: amd 2700x cooler / heatsink

    Solved
    ======
    I followed Antikythera's great advice and just attached the cooler as per the user manual at the appropriate step. The balance the assembly of my new system was done with normal bifocals, almost.... some leads from the computer case had very miniature markings, to indicate orientation. It was eye strain and magnifying glass use to match those cable ends to the pins shown on ASUS manual's pages describing installation.

    Helpful hint to anyone building a system.
    ==============================
    a) Use a modular PS for convenience.
    b) attach the 12volt cables to the MB prior to installing the mother board into the case and prior to attaching the cooler. If you defer this 12vold cable connection, make sure your wife or child is around to use their small fingers to locate the cable ends and to press the plugs home. Space is a bit tight to get your fingers and the cable ends in line with the 8 pin socket.

    c) The motherboard takes 9 screws. One screw at the 1'oclock position of the MB (back right corner), is very hard to reach. (see comment b) above.
    if you can, insert the screw in the motherboard and add a paper washer to the threads of that screw to stop the screw from tumbling out as you attach the MB to the case. If you do cannot make or use a paper washer, make sure to use a screwdriver with a tip is highly magnetized.

    d) After mounting the MB, attach the drives and sata cables, then the PSupply cables and other cable ends, Last install the ram and the Cooler. If everything is done right, your system will boot. Mine did.
    Leslie in Montreal

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  7. #7
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    Re: amd 2700x cooler / heatsink

    Quote Originally Posted by antikythera
    indeed, when it has been heat cycled it is strong enough to rip the CPU out of the socket if you are heavy handed during removal which can of course damage it.
    Hehe, yeah. The worst thing to do is to just pull it up w/o any slight movements to the side. For me, what works just fine is to do just that, slight moving to the sides so that the grease get a bit thinner and a bit more unstuck and than pull up, but not straight up, but on just one side, preferably on the one to which the HS was moved, so the resistance is smaller.

    Anyway, ever tried to get rid of any HS if the thermal compound used was a thermoglue? Hehe. Loong time ago, I had one MSI board. It had crappy active cooling on the south bridge. So I got a bigger HS to replace that tiny one from MSI, along with it's crappy fan. It felt a bit heavy so I used the thermal glue for it. It was great. Almost cool, not a single move. Well, after some time I was planning the upgrade and wanted that nice HS to be used sometime in the future on a different board or whatever else, so that I put back the MSI one and keep it. You know, it was very easy. Pulling it just up was out of question, I realized that soon enough. So I had that bright idea that if I just put the screwdriver beneath it and turn around, it will pop up?! Well, it did and very easily in fact! Along with the south bridge attached to it though! So I had it just hanging there on some of the mobo pathways. I wish you never see this sad outcome.
    So if you have to, use thermal glue, but only if you never want to replace it again.

    Leslie, that ATX12/EPS is usually not a problem, unless the case in question has really cramped space. End even then you can just use proper tools to put it in place, if hands can't squeeze there w/o pushing the CPU cooler out of the way.
    Plus, if the case in question has the PSU at the bottom and if the PSU is not modular or is only semi-modular and the ATX and ATX12/EPS is fixed would mean to first put that cable behind those mobo trays for cable management. And that would be pain.
    So my advice is if you are to get the case with PSU placement at the bottom, make sure tha ATX/ATX12 is really long enough. Otherwise you may end up with just it connected from above the GPU if it's too short. And that just looks horrible.
    I really don't like those cases much, but to get the classic PSU placement case these days is not so easy.

    Also, you just don't connect everything first and than just power it up. Basically, just ATX and ATX12/EPS, RAM and CPU. GPU if you have any and the integrated GPU is not present. If that lives, continue with the build. Connecting everything may just complicate things, but it also requires (in my case) some reasonable cable management, I just hate the mess. And that requires some time. It would be just wasted if I had to troubleshoot the non-booting system just after finishing it.

    One little tip on the mobo standoffs. BE sure to screw them really tightly. It's because if one later needs to get the mobo out, the screws in standoffs can jest get a bit stuck and one ends up with the whole standoff spinning when unscrewing the screw from it and pressing on the mobo from the bottom. If one is not careful and doesn't find out soon that this is the case, than depending on the standoff location, it can kill the mobo. But the warning sign is that the unscrewing is not going very easily and gets more tough with every turn of the screwdriver. Unless you hear some nasty crack, you have time.

  8. #8
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    Re: amd 2700x cooler / heatsink

    Quote Originally Posted by Maryyy
    Hehe, yeah. The worst thing to do is to just pull it up w/o any slight movements to the side. For me, what works just fine is to do just that, slight moving to the sides so that the grease get a bit thinner and a bit more unstuck and than pull up, but not straight up, but on just one side, preferably on the one to which the HS was moved, so the resistance is smaller.

    Anyway, ever tried to get rid of any HS if the thermal compound used was a thermoglue? Hehe. Loong time ago, I had one MSI board. It had crappy active cooling on the south bridge. So I got a bigger HS to replace that tiny one from MSI, along with it's crappy fan. It felt a bit heavy so I used the thermal glue for it. It was great. Almost cool, not a single move. Well, after some time I was planning the upgrade and wanted that nice HS to be used sometime in the future on a different board or whatever else, so that I put back the MSI one and keep it. You know, it was very easy. Pulling it just up was out of question, I realized that soon enough. So I had that bright idea that if I just put the screwdriver beneath it and turn around, it will pop up?! Well, it did and very easily in fact! Along with the south bridge attached to it though! So I had it just hanging there on some of the mobo pathways. I wish you never see this sad outcome.
    So if you have to, use thermal glue, but only if you never want to replace it again.

    Leslie, that ATX12/EPS is usually not a problem, unless the case in question has really cramped space. End even then you can just use proper tools to put it in place, if hands can't squeeze there w/o pushing the CPU cooler out of the way.


    Plus, if the case in question has the PSU at the bottom and if the PSU is not modular or is only semi-modular and the ATX and ATX12/EPS is fixed would mean to first put that cable behind those mobo trays for cable management. And that would be pain.
    So my advice is if you are to get the case with PSU placement at the bottom, make sure tha ATX/ATX12 is really long enough. Otherwise you may end up with just it connected from above the GPU if it's too short. And that just looks horrible.
    I really don't like those cases much, but to get the classic PSU placement case these days is not so easy.

    Also, you just don't connect everything first and than just power it up. Basically, just ATX and ATX12/EPS, RAM and CPU. GPU if you have any and the integrated GPU is not present. If that lives, continue with the build. Connecting everything may just complicate things, but it also requires (in my case) some reasonable cable management, I just hate the mess. And that requires some time. It would be just wasted if I had to troubleshoot the non-booting system just after finishing it.

    One little tip on the mobo standoffs. BE sure to screw them really tightly. It's because if one later needs to get the mobo out, the screws in standoffs can jest get a bit stuck and one ends up with the whole standoff spinning when unscrewing the screw from it and pressing on the mobo from the bottom. If one is not careful and doesn't find out soon that this is the case, than depending on the standoff location, it can kill the mobo. But the warning sign is that the unscrewing is not going very easily and gets more tough with every turn of the screwdriver. Unless you hear some nasty crack, you have time.

    After the system booted, I had left the hard disk light and power-on LEDS. Markings made it impossible to know polarity. Finally, I used a powerful magnifying glass on the tip of one plug to see a tiny triangle embossed in the plastic. I got that and the mate plugged, which made the final two plugins a snap.

    Full success with the installation. Zero failures mechanically or electrically.
    For about one day the headphone jack did not work. Today, there was a new kernel, and of course a new kernel requires a dracut run. That kernel installation repaired the headphone function.
    I am a happy camper. Aviva says I have gained my adult pacifier. She said that she was happy to know I am on the computer and not around to watch and comment on everything she does. I have learned and saved my marriage by recognizing that I am not in her bubble.

    A great help in my build has been Antikythera, yourself, and a few others. Thank you all.
    Leslie in Montreal

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  9. #9
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    Re: amd 2700x cooler / heatsink

    Glad you got it together and it all works. You shouldn't be waiting on the computer anymore to accomplish a task now . What flavor of Linux did you load?

  10. #10
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    Re: amd 2700x cooler / heatsink

    Hi Rclark

    I am limiting myself to Gnome and KDE. I have not recently tried XFCE, Mate. Linux Mint or other.

    I use RFRemix as my preferred Fedora re-spin. Why?
    RFRemix comes standard with rpmfusion, and many other free and non-free applications. It uses the anaconda installation program. At time of installation I can also choose all software which has been catalogued in the repositories.
    I like that my software choices are functioning at time of installation and thus, I don't concern myself with chasing up lib versions, etc. After installation, RFRemix uses Fedora's repositories and their own repositories for the non-FOSS stuff. Each Fedora update is also a RFRemix update.

    But I am seconding RFRemix/Fedora with SUSE's Tumbleweed. I found that SUSE's Tumbleweed to have very few issues. Tumbleweed, being a rolling release, does not force the user to wait 6 months for the next Fedora version.

    This rolling release concept works well with Tumbleweed. The negative side of both pure Fedora and Tumbleweed -- Those non-FOSS codecs that are needed to view some BBC news videos or others where the video protocol is non-free. In most cases, the codec issue is not a RFRemix issue.

    Tumbleweed allows me to install recent KDE, and GNOME versions at the same time, and after a reboot, to choose between KDE or GNOME at login time. When I boot, TWD, I choose between KDE, KDE Wayland, Gnome xorg, Gnome classic, or Gnome Wayland.
    With Fedora, It is KDE or Gnome, and trying to log in with the second choice, eg, install KDE version and add GNOME groups on top or vice-versa, fails the second version.

    Is any one distribution more efficient or truly more functional than the other? They should not be called Fedora or Tumbleweed any more, but KDE or GNOME distributions.

    I have tried Manjaro and had problems with the boot loader not being compatible with the above mentioned distributions . The Manjaro I installed is another flavor of GNOME or KDE.

    By the way, if you take the Live RFRemix to explore, it starts in Russian, But follow the icons to system settings and region, to switch to English. I log out and re-log into English
    The network installation ISO is only in English and that is what I use.
    Summary
    Fedora is #1 Tumbleweed is #2 #3 is "Fedora +1" beta.
    Last edited by lsatenstein; 14th January 2019 at 10:55 PM.
    Leslie in Montreal

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  11. #11
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    Re: amd 2700x cooler / heatsink

    Gotcha. I like Ubuntu (LXDE) as my first choice. Low memory footprint and fast. I also run Mint Cinnamon (LTS) as well on a couple of other computers. They are my style of user interface (glad we have choices! Unlike the 'other' major OS). They run well on my systems and eliminate the free/non free hassle too. On your new system, you can load VMs instead of switching disks. I have Windows 7, XP, Fedora, and a few other distros loaded in VMs. Works well for me when I want to check something out. My motto is keep it simple. One base OS per box. VMs for everything else.
    Last edited by rclark; 14th January 2019 at 09:34 PM.

  12. #12
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    Re: amd 2700x cooler / heatsink

    My new desktop system allows me to do what you stated. I am still getting accustomed to the existing bios options before I try VMing it.

    The mother board bios from the ASUS x470 Prime Plus has a design annoyance. With my old desktop, F2 was for working with the BIOS, and F8 was a bios menu presentation, the latter allowing one to select a boot drive, skipping the bios altogether. With this current bios, I have to enter the bios, then do F8 to select the boot drive. (eg, flash or other boot drive not within the grub menu) . I am hoping that there is a similar option with these new motherboard bios.
    Leslie in Montreal

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  13. #13
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    Re: amd 2700x cooler / heatsink

    Hm, I don't have to do it that way, I can use F8 directly just fine. It's an older Haswell mobo though - B85M-G.
    You have to press it after the boot logo is shown, which may be a problem for some monitors and display output configurations, as they can initialize a bit late, so you don't see the logo at all and the first thing to be seen may be just the Fedora boot screen.
    If you haven't tried already, then just after power on or reboot, keep pressing the F8, till the display output shows you where it got you.

  14. #14
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    Re: amd 2700x cooler / heatsink

    I usually remove the sticky paste that comes with the cooler (with alcohol), and apply something else, like arctic.

    For my 1600x, I am using a Thermalright ARO 14. It lowered my temp by 20c compared to the "stock" cooler I got with my "kit".
    "monsters John ... monsters from the ID..."
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    Re: amd 2700x cooler / heatsink

    Quote Originally Posted by bobx001
    I usually remove the sticky paste that comes with the cooler (with alcohol), and apply something else, like arctic.

    For my 1600x, I am using a Thermalright ARO 14. It lowered my temp by 20c compared to the "stock" cooler I got with my "kit".
    That was the third-party cooler bundled with your processor by the vendor? The Ryzen 1600X models didn't come with a thermal solution, that dodgy material you were supplied with was down to who you bought the kit from.

    The thermal interface on the AMD Wraith coolers is of equal quality to Arctic's.

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