How to make yum install list?
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  1. #1
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    How to make yum install list?

    I'd like to turn the output of "yum list installed" into a file list I can use to setup other machines? Something similar to "yum -y install < listofinstalled.txt" or something?

    Any simple solutions?

    Thanks
    F18

  2. #2
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    You could make a kickstart file of your system
    su
    yum install system-config-kickstart
    then
    system-config-kickstart --generate current.ks
    This post here may help you also (post #5)
    http://forums.fedoraforum.org/showthread.php?t=236789

  3. #3
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    Thanks!

    Code:
    [root@george ~]# system-config-kickstart --generate current.ks
    Traceback (most recent call last):
      File "/usr/bin/system-config-kickstart", line 66, in <module>
        useCliMode(value)
      File "/usr/bin/system-config-kickstart", line 41, in useCliMode
        import profileSystem
      File "/usr/share/system-config-kickstart/profileSystem.py", line 28, in <module>
        from system_config_keybard import keyboard
    ImportError: No module named system_config_keybard
    [root@george ~]#
    I'm gonna guess that is supposed to be keyboard, i'll try and edit the script and see what happens!

    ---------- Post added at 09:50 AM CST ---------- Previous post was at 09:45 AM CST ----------

    That worked to dump the packages, then I got this attempting to open it with system-config-kickstart:

    The following error was found while parsing your kickstart configuration:
    The following problem occurred on line 18 of the kickstart file:
    A single argument is expected for the timezone command

    Any way to manually input the .ks file into yum?

    EDIT: Duh, I see you posted that on message 5!
    Last edited by Dr.Diesel; 29th December 2009 at 03:59 PM.
    F18

  4. #4
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    I think this should work

    Code:
    $ yum list installed | awk '{print $1}' > installed.txt
    But it might involve a small bit of additional work of deleting the first couple of lines (which are not packages).
    Ofcourse this would only work if both the machines you are working on have the same architecture and OS (say x86_64 with fedora 12 64bit on one, and x86_64 with fedora 12 32bit on the other will not work).
    "If it is not broken, try harder"

  5. #5
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    Thanks, that will work perfect!
    F18

  6. #6
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    There is a spelling mistake in the code
    su
    gedit /usr/share/system-config-kickstart/profileSystem.py
    find (line28) system_config_keybard and correct to system_config_keyboard, its missing the o

  7. #7
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    This would be a great feature!

    After you have set up your current system with the programs you want, being able to store what applications are installed means if you upgrade (e.g. to Fedora 13) with a clean install (maybe your /home is in another partition) you can run this and get all of your applications re-installed for the new version.

    This would remove some of the pain of updating to new releases and dealing with a short release cycle. May not be too much better than just upgrading, but may actually work better because it's starting from a fresh system and if you've tried things out (installed) only to later remove them, you don't have to worry about straggling files cluttering up the place (except maybe with configuration folders in your home directory).
    Linux provides freedom, the problem is most users don't know what it is or how to use it.
    My Blog | Danbury Area Computer Society Board Member | Linux User# : 477531
    p.s. Anybody who sees I am incorrect in technical procedures, etc., please feel free to correct me. I'm just figuring this out as I go along. :D

  8. #8
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    Yum Extender

    try

    Code:
    # yum  -y  install  yumex
    Yum Extender will then be icon in the System Tools drop down menu (in F11 gnome anyway).

    Yum Extender will list what is installed including what you've recently just installed . . .
    and what is available to install.

    A great GUI front end for Yum !

  9. #9
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    You could install the rpm-cron package, which will generate a nightly list of installed packages at /var/log/rpmpkgs. This can of course be manually run any time as well by executing the cron job.

    If you have this, then just copy the file when you are planning an upgrade, fresh install or whatever.
    This file is also used by bash-completion for the rpm commands and so is useful for that as well.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by vallimar
    You could install the rpm-cron package, which will generate a nightly list of installed packages at /var/log/rpmpkgs. This can of course be manually run any time as well by executing the cron job.

    If you have this, then just copy the file when you are planning an upgrade, fresh install or whatever.
    This file is also used by bash-completion for the rpm commands and so is useful for that as well.
    If you can redirect that to a particular /home directory that would be awesome, as using a seperate /home partition is a popular way of making sure it survives the installation without having to backup-and-restore it all.
    Linux provides freedom, the problem is most users don't know what it is or how to use it.
    My Blog | Danbury Area Computer Society Board Member | Linux User# : 477531
    p.s. Anybody who sees I am incorrect in technical procedures, etc., please feel free to correct me. I'm just figuring this out as I go along. :D

  11. #11
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    Hello,

    To get a list of installed RPMs, use the following command :
    Code:
    rpm -qa --qf "%{NAME}\n" | sort > installed_rpm_list.txt
    to add ARCH (i586, i686, x86_64, etc.) to the packet names, do :
    Code:
    rpm -qa --qf "%{NAME}.%{ARCH}\n" | sort > installed_rpm_list.txt
    Therefore, it is easy to install the packets from that list :
    Code:
    yum install $(cat installed_rpm_list.txt)

  12. #12
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    Re: How to make yum install list?

    All, I've now used this dozens of time with great success! Thanks again to all for the above info.
    F18

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