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tamieleo
27th November 2005, 02:32 AM
i use a dual boot system fedora and windows xp, how can i share files with windows xp in fedora?

Firewing1
27th November 2005, 03:43 AM
This question has been answered many times before, so I'm not going to give a full explaination...
search the forum first, try searching "SMB"
http://www.fedoraforum.org/forum/showthread.php?t=85406&highlight=samba+firewing1
see that thread.
Firewing1

Spoon!
27th November 2005, 07:33 AM
I think the OP wants to have files be accessible from both the Windows and Linux systems on the same computer. (Is this correct?)

The best way is to have a FAT partition. Both Windows and Linux can read/write to FAT very well. If your Windows system is NTFS, Linux can read (but not write to) NTFS; get the NTFS kernel module from here (http://www.linux-ntfs.org/content/view/120/59/) or Livna. Also, Windows can read and/or write to ext2/ext3 partitions with various tools, including Explore2fs (http://uranus.it.swin.edu.au/~jn/linux/explore2fs.htm), Ext2 IFS (http://www.fs-driver.org/), and many others.

PenguinPride
28th November 2005, 01:54 AM
I don't believe that Windows XP gives the option to format with FAT, I think it is only NTFS. You have to purchase some sort of partitioning software to do that.

I solved this problem by using an external hard drive (100GB) with the FAT32 formatting. It works amazingly for me, I just share files with that. A 512M or bigger flash drive works well too..

MisterEd
28th November 2005, 02:33 AM
I don't believe that Windows XP gives the option to format with FAT, I think it is only NTFS. You have to purchase some sort of partitioning software to do that.
No need to buy anything just for formating. (It is true Windows XP has no way to resize partitions. You need to obtain software to do that.) Windows XP can create NTFS and FAT32 partitions (max 32GB for FAT32). I have been using shared FAT32 partions between Windows and linux for years.

https://home.comcast.net/~egkenny/images/WinXPFormat.jpg

MisterEd
28th November 2005, 02:45 AM
Here is my drive layout showing the Windows and linux partitions. Note that E: is the shared read/write partition between Windows and linux. The unknown partitions are linux ones. Since C: and D: are NTFS I can only read from them when in linux.

https://home.comcast.net/~egkenny/images/drivelayout.jpg

tamieleo
28th November 2005, 10:57 AM
actrually all my windows partition format is FAT32, can i read/write files from fedora to windows xp, if so how? thanks.

MisterEd
28th November 2005, 07:57 PM
actrually all my windows partition format is FAT32, can i read/write files from fedora to windows xp, if so how? thanks.
Open command windows in Linux

You must have root prvileges to set this up. To get this:
If you are logged in as root you already have it, or
if you are logged in as normal user type this command:
su -

To set up windows partitions:

1. To find out what your drive layout use fdisk command:

# fdisk -l /dev/hda

Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System
/dev/hda1 * 1 2550 20482843+ 7 Win95 FAT32
/dev/hda2 2551 9964 59552955 f Win95 Ext'd (LBA)
/dev/hda5 2551 5100 20482843+ 7 Win95 FAT32
/dev/hda6 5101 7650 20482843+ 7 Win95 FAT32
/dev/hda7 7651 7663 104391 83 Linux
/dev/hda8 7664 7917 2040223+ 82 Linux swap
/dev/hda9 7918 9964 16442496 83 Linux

2. From that you can infer this:

/dev/hda1 = Windows C: FAT32
/dev/hda2 = Windows Extended Partition
/dev/hda5 = Windows D: FAT32
/dev/hda6 = Windows E: FAT32
/dev/hda7 = Linux /boot
/dev/hda8 = Linux /
/dev/hda9 = Linux swap

3. Go to the linux partition created to hold mount points:

# cd /mnt

4. Create mount points for your Windows partitions (the names are your choice)

# mkdir winc
# mkdir wind
# mkdir wine

5. Try mounting the Windows partitions manually

# mount /dev/hda1 winc
# mount /dev/hda5 wind
# mount /dev/hda6 wine

6. You can now read/write these partitions like any other partitions in linux

7. Since these partitions were manually mounted you should unmount them when you are finished with them or are ready to shutdown or reboot.

# umount /mnt/winc
# umount /mnt/wind
# umount /mnt/wine

8. To automate the mounting (and unmounting) of any of your fat32 windows partitions add an entry(s) in the /etc/fstab file.

The following fstab entry will give read/write access to root and read-only access to everyone else:
/dev/hda1 /mnt/winc vfat defaults 0 0

The following fstab entry will give read/write access to everyone:
/dev/hda1 /mnt/winc vfat defaults,umask=0 0 0

tamieleo
29th November 2005, 03:27 AM
hi MisterEd, thanks for the wonderful reply, i'm new for fedora, i got everything confused, so i have lots of things to ask.

what is linux swap, i saw it in your linux partition, and when i installing fedora also saw it once.

can i use your command read/write all the things from fedora(windows xp) to windows xp(fedora), i mean every type of file, right? or there are something i can't read or write.

oh one more thing, my cpu is AMD64, it seems i can't install flash plugin in fedora, any idea?

MisterEd
29th November 2005, 05:12 AM
hi MisterEd, thanks for the wonderful reply, i'm new for fedora, i got everything confused, so i have lots of things to ask.

what is linux swap, i saw it in your linux partition, and when i installing fedora also saw it once.
Virtual memory is space reserved on your hard drive to supplement your RAM. When your computer needs more RAM than it has it dumps running programs to virtual memory when they are not needed at that instant. Later when they are needed they can be pulled back to RAM. The advantage of virtual memory is they alow you to load more programs before you get the out of memory error. The disadvantage is that reading/writing to the virtual memory on the hard drive is much slower than accessing the program in normal RAM. It is not uncommon to reserve 1-1/2 to 2 times the amount of RAM as virtual memory. For example if you have 1GB of RAM you might reserve 1.5GB of space on your hard drive for virtual memory.

In linux the swap partition(s) are special fixed size partitions used for virtual memory.

In Windows this is seen as a special file called pagefile.sys. By default pagefile.sys is located in C: and can grow and shring in size as needed. In can also be configured to be a fixed size.


can i use your command read/write all the things from fedora(windows xp) to windows xp(fedora), i mean every type of file, right? or there are something i can't read or write.

You can copy/move files between the Windows and Linux either using the command line or using graphics programs. In linux there are graphical programs similar to Windows Explorer that allow you to drag and drop files between Windows and linux. The only exception is Windows NTFS partitions which are read-only in linux.

You can copy files such as text files and graphic files between linux and Windows. You can edit text files from each. Note Notepad can not handle linux text these files correctly but Wordpad does. Graphic files should be no problem moving back and forth.

You can copy program type of files between them but this is for archive purposes only since they will not run on the other operating system. The exception is that some program files from Windows can be made to run on linux if you launch them with special linux programs such as wine. Some programs that you can get for linux are actually Windows programs running under wine. That is why they seem to run much slower than when they run under Windows.


oh one more thing, my cpu is AMD64, it seems i can't install flash plugin in fedora, any idea?
It has notthing to do with AMD64 since Athlon 64 runs both 32-bit and 64-bit operating systems with not problems. In fact now days most Intel Pentium 4s and Celerons are also both 32-bit and 64-bit compatible just like the Athlon 64s. BTW, I have Windows XP and Fedora on my Athlon 64 3400+ laptop.

It seemed one time I tried to install the flash plug-in in Firefox but it did not work. Some time I will have to investigate why that happened.

tamieleo
29th November 2005, 05:36 AM
can you tell me some graphical programs run in fedora that can drag and drop files between Windows and linux? thanks.

MisterEd
29th November 2005, 04:18 PM
can you tell me some graphical programs run in fedora that can drag and drop files between Windows and linux? thanks.
GNOME:

RedHat Start menu select Applications menu. Select System Tools -> File Browser.

I have Icon on desktop called Computer which is like My Computer in Windows.

You can create your own icons on desktop which links to a partition or folder. To do this right-click on desktop and select Create Launcher. Give icon a name. For Type select Link. Browse to filesystem. Select folder to link to.

KDE:

From RedHat Start menu select Home icon to browse home folder with Konqueror. You can also browse to any other folder.

From RedHat Start menu select System Tools -> File Manager to bring up Konqueror.

You can create your own icons on desktop which links to a partition or folder. To do this right-click on desktop and select Create New. Select Link to Location. When you are finished you have a link to Konqueror that opens at the selected folder.

You can also drag and drop from a GUI browser such as Konqueror to a comandline type console/terminal window.

tamieleo
30th November 2005, 03:04 AM
thanks MisterEd, wonderful reply!

tamieleo
1st December 2005, 03:51 AM
i got a problem with the following command:

[root@localhost mnt]# /dev/hda5 /mnt/wind vfat defaults,umask=0 0 0
-bash: /dev/hda5: Permission denied

any idea?

Firewing1
1st December 2005, 11:54 PM
that line has to be added to the /etc/fstab file. You'll need to be root, so do this:
su -
enter root password
gedit /etc/fstab
add the
/dev/hda5 /mnt/wind vfat defaults,umask=0 0 0
line to the end of it
reboot
Firewing1

ELD
7th December 2005, 06:56 PM
I installed the ntfs drivers and tried this but it says "mount: unknown filesystem type 'ntfs'" even though i installed the ntfs drivers posted in this topic?


Open command windows in Linux

You must have root prvileges to set this up. To get this:
If you are logged in as root you already have it, or
if you are logged in as normal user type this command:
su -

To set up windows partitions:

1. To find out what your drive layout use fdisk command:

# fdisk -l /dev/hda

Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System
/dev/hda1 * 1 2550 20482843+ 7 Win95 FAT32
/dev/hda2 2551 9964 59552955 f Win95 Ext'd (LBA)
/dev/hda5 2551 5100 20482843+ 7 Win95 FAT32
/dev/hda6 5101 7650 20482843+ 7 Win95 FAT32
/dev/hda7 7651 7663 104391 83 Linux
/dev/hda8 7664 7917 2040223+ 82 Linux swap
/dev/hda9 7918 9964 16442496 83 Linux

2. From that you can infer this:

/dev/hda1 = Windows C: FAT32
/dev/hda2 = Windows Extended Partition
/dev/hda5 = Windows D: FAT32
/dev/hda6 = Windows E: FAT32
/dev/hda7 = Linux /boot
/dev/hda8 = Linux /
/dev/hda9 = Linux swap

3. Go to the linux partition created to hold mount points:

# cd /mnt

4. Create mount points for your Windows partitions (the names are your choice)

# mkdir winc
# mkdir wind
# mkdir wine

5. Try mounting the Windows partitions manually

# mount /dev/hda1 winc
# mount /dev/hda5 wind
# mount /dev/hda6 wine

6. You can now read/write these partitions like any other partitions in linux

7. Since these partitions were manually mounted you should unmount them when you are finished with them or are ready to shutdown or reboot.

# umount /mnt/winc
# umount /mnt/wind
# umount /mnt/wine

8. To automate the mounting (and unmounting) of any of your fat32 windows partitions add an entry(s) in the /etc/fstab file.

The following fstab entry will give read/write access to root and read-only access to everyone else:
/dev/hda1 /mnt/winc vfat defaults 0 0

The following fstab entry will give read/write access to everyone:
/dev/hda1 /mnt/winc vfat defaults,umask=0 0 0

Spoon!
7th December 2005, 11:33 PM
You have to either reboot or do "modprobe ntfs" to load the module.

ELD
8th December 2005, 10:34 AM
Well i tried modprobe and i got this



[root@localhost ~]# modprobe ntfs
FATAL: Error inserting ntfs (/lib/modules/2.6.14-1.1644_FC4/kernel/fs/ntfs/ntfs.ko): Invalid module format

Gu3st
9th December 2005, 04:29 PM
i hope this will help u


http://www.linux-ntfs.org/

Zipster
14th December 2005, 09:28 AM
It seemed one time I tried to install the flash plug-in in Firefox but it did not work. Some time I will have to investigate why that happened.


The main problem could be that you use a 64-bit firefox... There is no support yet for 64-bit flash (could be wrong here)

cyberbitus
16th February 2006, 09:50 PM
Thanks, Mr. Ed. Believe it or not, this thread is still very useful to a lot of us noobs! I came across this today and you explained very clearly what seemed to be goblygook in the other threads.

Ken

ELD
17th February 2006, 11:09 AM
Good to see people are looking through the forum :)

I am going to re-install FC4 today hopefully and try again.

Firewing1
17th February 2006, 08:24 PM
for the NTFS problem, install Livna (http://rpm.livna.org) and then type

su -
yum install kernel-module-ntfs-$(uname -r)
Firewing1

cyberbitus
20th February 2006, 04:54 PM
Thanks, Firewing. I notice that you help out quite a bit in these forums and your knowledge is appreciated.

I found this in another thread - same as your response above. I'm trying to learn to take more time searching before I post.

Ken

Firewing1
20th February 2006, 11:49 PM
Thanks, Firewing. I notice that you help out quite a bit in these forums and your knowledge is appreciated.

I found this in another thread - same as your response above. I'm trying to learn to take more time searching before I post.

Ken
Hah, no problem... I get bored sometimes, or I just need a distraction from my homework so I come here. I figure it's better than playing WCIII 'cause at least I'm helping others :)
Firewing1

marooned21
12th March 2006, 12:04 AM
Ha, my poison was FF11. Im glad to see that you can pull away from it to help out, I know I look for your replies when doing a search for a problem. Also now ill be looking for MisterEd, you did a good job at explaining that and it really helped me. Thanks :)