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357mag
19th August 2017, 09:47 PM
I don't need a media writer and do not want a USB stick. What I would like is to simply download the x64 iso image and burn it to disc and intall Fedora right off the bat.

No live CD is needed.

Can I do this or is this media writer thing the only way to get it?

glennzo
19th August 2017, 10:58 PM
You can write to CD. I do it this way...


sudo dd if=/path/to/iso of=/dev/sr0 bs=4M; sync

This assumes that the CD/DVD is in fact /dev/sr0. Works well.

On my system I have a hard disk where I store my ISO files. Therefore I would use:

sudo dd if=/mnt/iso/Fedora/26/Fedora-LXDE-Live-x86_64-26-1.5.iso of=/dev/sr0 bs=4M;sync


Did I misunderstand? You don't want to use a CD?

357mag
20th August 2017, 03:31 AM
Why do I need to use a Linux terminal to burn an iso to disk? I want to download an iso while I'm in Windows and just use Image Burn to burn it to disk.

Or is that not possible?

lsatenstein
20th August 2017, 03:37 AM
I have often pondered the same question. Definitely not a good idea.

The only concern I have is if one needs to reformat the disk on which the downloaded ISO resides or reformat the partition holding the Linux distribution you intend to execute.

antikythera
20th August 2017, 10:15 AM
Why do I need to use a Linux terminal to burn an iso to disk? I want to download an iso while I'm in Windows and just use Image Burn to burn it to disk.

Or is that not possible?

yes it is possible. any fedora ISO can of course be burnt using Windows built in tool or a third-party application. when you start up with the burnt ISO it would be wise to check it is okay with the media test which is an option in the menu that appears before actually using it to install the OS.

nsnbm
20th August 2017, 10:32 AM
357mag wrote:


Why do I need to use a Linux terminal to burn an iso to disk? I want to download an iso while I'm in Windows and just use Image Burn to burn it to disk.

Or is that not possible?


It may be possible. You can try and use the M$ tool to burn the iso onto a disk, and then use that disk to install. There may be no problems with that. It sounds like that's what you wish to do. However, I know that users have had trouble installing with the M$ burnt disk. The first thing you can do with the burnt disk is to check it by booting it and then using the "check this disk" option which will tell whether it thinks the disk is installable. If it's okay, then proceed to boot it.

If the disk is a workstation version, it'll boot up as a live disk allowing you to use it just in RAM without touching your hard drive, and, it'll have an option on the desktop to install to the hard drive. If the disk is a server version, it starts the installation process straight away. Bear in mind, the server version has no gui.

The way I burn disks from isos is, after downloading the iso on a linux system, to use the linux wodim program as root, e.g.


wodim -v speed=1 -isosize fedora.iso

That's been reliable.

kldixon
20th August 2017, 11:45 AM
It is not at all clear what you would like to do.

I don't need a media writer and do not want a USB stick.
If you are going to

download the x64 iso image and burn it to disc then you will need a DVD drive capable of writing. The Live iso will not fit on a CD.

If you meant install from the iso image on a hard disc directly to the hard disc, and you only have Windows 7, then, AFAIK, there is no windows application that can do that.

You can install from an iso image on hard disk without burning a DVD or copying to a USB stick if you already have a Grub installation. The complaint I registered here has since been resolved:
https://www.redhat.com/archives/anaconda-devel-list/2015-October/msg00028.html
https://www.forums.fedoraforum.org/showthread.php?t=307202

Indeed, you can install without even downloading an iso. For instance, I did once succeed in booting the installer directly from a public mirror using iPXE as a UEFI application (http://ipxe.org/start), but you need a lot of knowledge to achieve it.

Copying to a USB stick is offered by Redhat as being the most universal and simplest method.

lsatenstein
20th August 2017, 04:58 PM
I have often pondered the same question. Definitely not a good idea.

The only concern I have is if one needs to reformat the disk on which the downloaded ISO resides or reformat the partition holding the Linux distribution you intend to execute.

In the original posting, the question asked "Why can't I execute the ISO directly, without creating a bootable copy?"

If the upgrade or replacement of your own system, it would have a reformat step. That step would probably reformat the partition wherein the iso was located.

Kobuck
20th August 2017, 05:26 PM
The OP clarified with the following:


Why do I need to use a Linux terminal to burn an iso to disk? I want to download an iso while I'm in Windows and just use Image Burn to burn it to disk.

Or is that not possible?

Windows is perfectly capable of burning an ISO 9660 (joliet) file which is the format used for the CD/DVD disc images provided by Fedora.

There is of course the caveats regarding which version of Windows you are using. In Windows 10 with all updates in place ( a particularly challenging feat in itself ) you just click on the iso image you want to burn , select "manage" on the task bar, then click burn image. I would also check the verify check box just to be safe.

After successful completion you have the same disc image as anyone using the Linux tools. With all the same steps required to get to a final install running on your intended system drive. :)

kldixon
20th August 2017, 07:05 PM
Ah! I think you have resolved the issue, Kobuck.
However, I am curious as to why the OP thought he might need additional software to write a Live iso image to a DVD.

solo2101
20th August 2017, 07:33 PM
I think the op is asking for something like WUBI in Ubuntu. Where you just mount the iso in windows and proceeds with the installation.

I don't think wubi is available anymore. Defenetly not in fedora. You would need an external media like a cd or usb.

Hmmmm... that's a good question... I'll have to investigate

---------- Post added at 11:33 AM ---------- Previous post was at 11:30 AM ----------

Never mind. .. I re-read the question. ... still something to look at. ..

357mag
20th August 2017, 07:34 PM
Initially I couldn't find a place to download the .iso file. But I'm trying a download now from somewhere else. I'll burn it to disk using Image Burn and then boot from it and try an install.

I don't like this business of not being able to install Linux directly. I don't want to go through an extra step monkeying with a Live CD.

Perhaps you can help me with something specific. I really want to skin the desktop immediately to XP Luna. So far no luck with all the distros I've tried. That may be due to not using the correct desktop environment. I can't figure out how to change that.

I don't know what Fedora defaults to or if I would have to change to a different desktop right away.

Hope you can help me with this.

solo2101
20th August 2017, 07:36 PM
You can download the iso here

https://download.fedoraproject.org/pub/fedora/linux/releases/26/Workstation/x86_64/iso/Fedora-Workstation-Live-x86_64-26-1.5.iso

solo2101
20th August 2017, 07:50 PM
It sounds like you want the netisltall version. It's not a livecd and you can start the installation right away

dswaner
20th August 2017, 08:19 PM
As per solo2101:

It sounds like you want the netisltall version

You may well be correct, but unless you've got a fast internet connection, and something goes wrong, you may need another long download, re-doing the netinstall. With my connection, I only want to do that initial download once.

And then the usual long upgrade after the install.

nsnbm
21st August 2017, 12:01 AM
You can write to CD. I do it this way...

sudo dd if=/path/to/iso of=/dev/sr0 bs=4M; sync


dd won't write to a blank disk in this f26.


[root@owl ~]$ dd if=Memtest86-7.2.iso of=/dev/sr0
dd: failed to open '/dev/sr0': Read-only file system

lsatenstein
21st August 2017, 12:03 AM
I use what Fedora's anaconda calls the standard partition layout.
a biosboot partition
a swap partition
a / partition
a /home partition.

I usually go 60/40 in favour of / versus /home, because my volume of data is stored on a separate disk (/archive).
I typically use a total combined partition size of 60 gigs.
I also do use the network install iso, with few extra groups.

After the installation, I run a script (refer to my post below, to download that script). I do it that way because it allows me to use the new Fedora build while in the background the script executes to update the system,

So, as I wipe clean all but the /home partition, I need to have an ISO that is loaded to a flash drive.

solo2101
21st August 2017, 02:55 AM
Perhaps you can help me with something specific. I really want to skin the desktop immediately to XP Luna. So far no luck with all the distros I've tried. That may be due to not using the correct desktop environment. I can't figure out how to change that.



Cinnamon desktop has a XP theme very nice...I think the name is CinnXP... I have it my laptop

kldixon
21st August 2017, 09:12 AM
@dswaner. You should not be concerned about doing a network install over a dubious network connection.

If you download an iso using a browser, then the browser will keep partial files and can pick up where it left off after a network drop-out.

Similarly, anaconda uses dnf to download all the packages it is going to install to a cache before it starts installing them and only deletes the cache after installation is complete. If the network fails while downloading the packages then the cache will remain and, if you re-do the installation, dnf will only download packages not already in the cache. I benefited from this behaviour when anaconda hung at package installation. See:
https://bugzilla.redhat.com/show_bug.cgi?id=1264943

And, of course, there is no long update after the install. :)

Kobuck
21st August 2017, 12:55 PM
I don't like this business of not being able to install Linux directly. I don't want to go through an extra step monkeying with a Live CD.


Whether you use the Live CD or the netinstall (my preference) the install process does a lot of low level access to the hardware on your installation target. Trying to do this while another OS is in operation is significantly more difficult. Disk and network activity, active security protections, etc. all interfere with the installers ability to get the required information to correctly configure the installation. Not to mention the eventual need to reformat at least one of your (potentially active) hard drives. The key here is the installation process is more than just copying files to an installation target. There is a lot of scanning hardware and configuring appropriate driver modules going on.

I find creating a netinstall .iso on a usb stick is the most hassel free approach.



Perhaps you can help me with something specific. I really want to skin the desktop immediately to XP Luna. So far no luck with all the distros I've tried. That may be due to not using the correct desktop environment. I can't figure out how to change that.

I don't know what Fedora defaults to or if I would have to change to a different desktop right away.


Fedora's default desktop is Gnome 3, but the net install process allows you to select from several others. ( XP Luna is not one of them )

Sorry, I can't help with building an alternative desktop environment.

Update: I googled "XP Luna" and found it is a Windows XP visual style. I found no reference to any Linux implementations of this style. However, there do appear to be themes available for Gnome or Mate that will give you the "Windows Luna" appearance.

dswaner
21st August 2017, 04:09 PM
@kldixon:
My recent (this year) experience with firefox is that a failed download does not resume, but downloads the whole file again. firefox used to resume for partial downloads.

lsatenstein
21st August 2017, 04:48 PM
@kldixon:
My recent (this year) experience with firefox is that a failed download does not resume, but downloads the whole file again. firefox used to resume for partial downloads.

My experience is that Firefox (54+) does resume. However I always use wget -c file_to_download from the command line

dswaner
21st August 2017, 05:09 PM
@lsatenstein:

I'd guess that firefox has not resumed an iso download for me twice in the past year, and for at least one of those instances, the download was at the very end, with just a few bytes to finish.

Apparently, the download resume has some algorithm it goes through to determine if it can resume or not - perhaps if the mirror that was being used goes down, then it cannot pickup with another mirror, and must redo the entire file.

Or maybe I need to do something in the firefox download applet and not just click on the Fedora Project download button again?