PDA

View Full Version : GNOME has become a slow dog



bobx001
7th March 2017, 03:15 PM
I just installed FC25 on an older (2007) Mini-PC I have, an Asus Nova P1 , and I have to say, :Y:dis:

jesus lord ! what a DOG.

I could not even run firefox, it would just lock up the whole PC, my mouse would only respond after 10 second or so, and only appear on random screen locations.

So, I managed to get into a terminal:

su -
vi /etc/selinux/config , change options to disabled
reboot
go into terminal again
su -
yum group install "Xfce Desktop"
yum install lxdm
systemctl disable gdm.service
systemctl enable lxdm.service
systemctl enable sshd.service

reboot
chose Xfce from the login meny

Halleluyahh !! I have a working PC again ! what a relief !

I don't know what's gotten into the Gnome guys, I think it's the gnome shell, or maybe gdm, but they absolutely make everything DOG-SLOW, and that's *not* how Linux should be.
right ?:cool:

flyingdutchman
7th March 2017, 05:37 PM
I'm sorry to say, but if you want a usably fast system, then you need XFCE or KDE. The Gnome Linux distros have lost their marbles.

Dutchy
7th March 2017, 05:57 PM
Yes, gnome-shell has become an unstable dog-slow piece of unusable crap, but hey it looks nice and you can now create and look up recipes (https://wiki.gnome.org/Apps/Recipes). Gotta set priorities right?

I am this close to switch to XFCE after using Gnome 3 since its incarnation, but I still have a few gripes with it:
- way too much stuff to configure after installation (instead of installing some extensions)
- no shortcut to move windows to other screens
- no integrated music player control as far as I know

It really is a shame because gnome was very close to being really great but I just don't see it happening any more, not with all the stupid design choices they keep making and their inability to produce stuff that is needed and that actually works. Gnome now simply is a polished disintegrating turd.

glennzo
7th March 2017, 06:13 PM
I've been happily using LXDE for a few years now. It seems that I have only a small percentage of the every day issues that others are reporting.

bobx001
7th March 2017, 06:46 PM
I've been happily using LXDE for a few years now. It seems that I have only a small percentage of the every day issues that others are reporting.


LXDE is cool, similar to Xfce in many aspects, but in Xfce I have more "Appearance" control, and since I do mostly programming work, and always in the dark, then I like the way it lets the whole interface be dark, without sudden "oh my gosh what just hit me" bright flashes.:Y

One plus that LXDM has over all other Managers is its ability to "stay hidden" when for example running a remote PC connected directly to the TV, via synergy, and running mplayer in full screen mode. Usually then, with all other display managers, when the mouse leaves the TV screen, the "panel" suddenly appears, and even if it's in auto-hide mode, you still get a few lines somewhere. But, that does not happen with LXDM. :cool:

---------- Post added at 06:46 PM ---------- Previous post was at 06:42 PM ----------


I'm sorry to say, but if you want a usably fast system, then you need XFCE or KDE. The Gnome Linux distros have lost their marbles.

I am fully Xfce since many years. I tried KDE on and off, but it's got way to many gadgets, and when something odd happens, like accidentally dragging an open app from its menubar onto the Panel (which for a power user could happen once / day or so), suddenly you are out of ram, out of swap space, out of disk space, and out of a PC. :doh:

lsatenstein
8th March 2017, 05:35 AM
I must be the exception. Gnome runs just fine on my laptop and my desktop.

JONOR
8th March 2017, 09:30 AM
Gnome 3 runs mostly fine for me too on hardware more recent than a ten year old Mini-PC, but i don't game or use virtualisation apps. Would never describe it as fast though :rtfl:
Slow dog it is.
Just had a major mess up (http://www.forums.fedoraforum.org/showthread.php?t=313503) pass through almost as this is typed, or perhaps it was a lure for enabling a testing-repo.
Be interested to hear from any active Enlightenment users and their findings on F25.
Yeah, if that ain't click bait for a certain Dan..g...g....g you-know-who then i don't know what is :D

antikythera
8th March 2017, 10:07 AM
I must be the exception. Gnome runs just fine on my laptop and my desktop.
It all rather depends on a few critical factors regardless of the system's age. Processor speed, how many cores it has, amount of RAM installed, GPU type and how much dedicated and/or shared system memory it has. If one or more of these requirements is left wanting then GNOME 3 can run slow as molasses but then so can Cinnamon too.

Dutchy
8th March 2017, 12:50 PM
Gnome 3 runs mostly fine for me too on hardware more recent than a ten year old Mini-PC, but i don't game or use virtualisation apps. Would never describe it as fast though :rtfl:
Slow dog it is.
Just had a major mess up (http://www.forums.fedoraforum.org/showthread.php?t=313503) pass through almost as this is typed, or perhaps it was a lure for enabling a testing-repo.
Be interested to hear from any active Enlightenment users and their findings on F25.
Yeah, if that ain't click bait for a certain Dan..g...g....g you-know-who than i don't know what is :D
Try using gnome for longer than a day at a time. Even better, try it using the wayland session.

JONOR
8th March 2017, 01:12 PM
Wayland will have to wait a bit longer, need GIMP and Shutter working.

tankist02
8th March 2017, 11:39 PM
Gnome 3 is resource-hungry, but when it is satisfied it provides a really smooth experience, especially with Wayland. I used to always have video tearing on highly dynamic scenes in HD videos. I tried a lot of recipes which didn't help much until I tried Gnome + Wayland on F25.

ElderSnake
9th March 2017, 02:50 AM
I must be in the minority, but I really like GNOME these days, even though I wasn't a fan at first. It also runs nice and snappy on my modernish machines. I wouldn't dream of running it on older hardware hardware, but that's why we have lightweight environments available.

Wayland and GNOME especially is a God send for me. I hated, HATED dealing with screen tearing in videos over the years. Which some compositors could patch over the cracks, as it were, but it never seemed perfect in all cases. Wayland makes everything smooth and consistent though.

I can understand GNOME not being everyone's cup of tea though, but we have alternative environments and window managers aplenty. But I would say if GNOME is helping to push the likes of Wayland along, it can only be a good thing, even if one chooses not to use it.

Dutchy
9th March 2017, 10:05 AM
Gnome 3 is resource-hungry, but when it is satisfied it provides a really smooth experience, especially with Wayland. [...]

Until you use it for longer than a day and one of the many many never addressed memory leaks starts biting you. Especially when you enhance it with a couple of extension (eg dash to dock) this will be noticeable and eventually leads to teeth gnashing and head desking. Then you need to replace the session which you can't on wayland.

Dutchy
9th March 2017, 10:36 AM
[...]

I can understand GNOME not being everyone's cup of tea though, but we have alternative environments and window managers aplenty. But I would say if GNOME is helping to push the likes of Wayland along, it can only be a good thing, even if one chooses not to use it.

True, but let's face reality, at this point Gnome can no longer be considered a stable DE viable for every day use, it looks more like an eternal tech demo. It has regressed too much over its lifetime and there seems to be no vision nor will left to fix the fundamental problems of the DE and the way it is developed. The shell seems to be on life support and the devs only care about their little apps and the incorporation of some new tech that makes the whole thing perform worse and worse (ie wayland) because they built everything in a stupid unsustainable way (single process, single threaded, javascript, etc.).

They really need to go back to fix the fundamental flaws with the architecture and the way it is being developed. Stop removing features that work because they are not discoverable (nautilus accels) before you have a working alternative. The trainwreck that gnome has become smells like a really bad decision process and prioritisation all caused by absence of good leadership. If you can't introduce new tested functionality and you can't produce a new stable release every 6 months then don't.

Just imagine microsoft presented something like this, then kept regressing instead of fixing it, the open sourcers would destroy them. You can say what you want about their user-hostile stance after Windows 7 but at least their shell isn't littered with memory leaks, doesn't freeze inexplicably nor blow your session away when you move the mouse in the wrong way or launch the wrong application.

ElderSnake
9th March 2017, 10:08 PM
True, but let's face reality, at this point Gnome can no longer be considered a stable DE viable for every day use, it looks more like an eternal tech demo. It has regressed too much over its lifetime and there seems to be no vision nor will left to fix the fundamental problems of the DE and the way it is developed. The shell seems to be on life support and the devs only care about their little apps and the incorporation of some new tech that makes the whole thing perform worse and worse (ie wayland) because they built everything in a stupid unsustainable way (single process, single threaded, javascript, etc.).

They really need to go back to fix the fundamental flaws with the architecture and the way it is being developed. Stop removing features that work because they are not discoverable (nautilus accels) before you have a working alternative. The trainwreck that gnome has become smells like a really bad decision process and prioritisation all caused by absence of good leadership. If you can't introduce new tested functionality and you can't produce a new stable release every 6 months then don't.

Just imagine microsoft presented something like this, then kept regressing instead of fixing it, the open sourcers would destroy them. You can say what you want about their user-hostile stance after Windows 7 but at least their shell isn't littered with memory leaks, doesn't freeze inexplicably nor blow your session away when you move the mouse in the wrong way or launch the wrong application.

It sounds like you're describing a pretty old version of GNOME shell, as I used to have some of those problems years ago, but it runs beautifully now. And that's with long running uptimes.

The biggest issues of used to have with GNOME shell was running it on proprietary NVIDIA drivers, where it would memory leak like crazy and be sluggish as hell. But then I've never had a great desktop experience with NVIDIA, which is why I now run amdgpu.

No, for users such as myself, GNOME is now one of the most stable, snappy and smooth experiences, but I guess there will always be exceptions.

Edit : in saying that, I was never a fan of the Javascript driven architecture etc either. But it seems to work well generally these days :confused: I guess I'll use it til it breaks one day or becomes horribly slow compared to its competitors.

bobx001
9th March 2017, 10:16 PM
Don't know about you guys, but any Windowing platform that unilaterally decided to appropriate itself a piece of the screen, and cannot be "told to go away" , is by definition, dictatorial behaviour. (example .... the Gnome black bar on top)

That is why I choose more "friendly" environments, where Xfce, and LXDE, are kings of the road (+ ahead). Small, simple, capable, configurable, they are not picky on hardware.

but then again, that is my "cup of tea" since I got a gazillion PCs floating around my environment, including some old dogs which still serve some purpose, so I need good common denominators.

EDIT: but my installing Fedora Workstation (FC25 latest version, not an "old version of Gnome") on a 1GB RAM "older" Mini-PC with a Dual Core 2Ghz processor with an i915 GPU should have worked without a hitch, and it alsmot did ........ until GNOME started and I tried to "do anything"... to no avail, which led to my original post "A DOG". shocking !@

EDIT#2: and I can guarantee you that it does not do Fedora any good !

ElderSnake
9th March 2017, 10:39 PM
Truth be known, if MATE had Wayland compatibility, I'd be so there :D

And yeah bobx, I wouldn't dream of running GNOME on hardware like that. That's where the lighter weight environments shine. I have tried things like GNOME or even KDE on older more memory and GPU limited systems like netbooks, it's just not pleasant.

bobx001
9th March 2017, 10:40 PM
Truth be known, if MATE had Wayland compatibility, I'd be so there :D

If you got some time, could you pls explain in one or 2 sentences Wayland to me ?:confused:

JONOR
15th March 2017, 03:42 PM
It all rather depends on a few critical factors regardless of the system's age. Processor speed, how many cores it has, amount of RAM installed, GPU type and how much dedicated and/or shared system memory it has. If one or more of these requirements is left wanting then GNOME 3 can run slow as molasses but then so can Cinnamon too.

Gnome would be better received by newcomers IMHO if they did what some app developers do and
provide a recommended system requirements of the above critical factors on their Gnome 3 page (https://www.gnome.org/gnome-3/) of Gnome.org.
Have sent an email requesting they do this.
Pitivi already do this (http://www.pitivi.org/manual/sysreq.html) for instance.

ETA


Try using gnome for longer than a day at a time. Even better, try it using the wayland session.

X without any Wayland is so buggy at boot, it's Wayland or no way here.

gordon64
22nd March 2017, 11:27 AM
bobx001


If you got some time, could you pls explain in one or 2 sentences Wayland to me

The reason I am here is because gnome on wayland is pretty good.

if you do not autologin, your choices from memory are
gnome
gnome classic
and something else

gnome....means gnome on Xwayland and we are not on true wayland or wayland without X

try this


echo $XDG_SESSION_TYPE

I just installed XFCE and it reports X11 but Gnome reports wayland.

so roughly speaking wayland is a graphical engine needed a desktop environment or window manager

if you kill the login manager and have weston installed, you would be on pure Wayland.

but that lacks apps so for now we are better off on XWayland.

################################
as we know linux offers choices. I am not an expert but try the gnome classic and you should be back on X11 (Xorg)

sorry it took me too long....I am not an expert :cool:

gordon64
22nd March 2017, 11:36 AM
sorry forgot to mention a possible cure for the "black bar"
if you are on Gnome (wayland) press F11 and bar is gone.

most VLC and other app uses this feature. F11 means maximize screen.

if you would like a quick max to under the black bar, which is my default,
I open an app
hold the modifier key and press the up arrow.

---for most people that is the Windows key unless you have a mac keyboard

as I can't find a minimize button top RH corner of my gnome apps, reverse those kb shortcuts to get to desktop
mod + down key

(alternatively open a new window with
mod + pagedown key)

JONOR
22nd March 2017, 12:34 PM
@gordon64 buttons for minimize, maximize can be set from the Windows tab of tweak-tool app.

gordon64
22nd March 2017, 01:40 PM
@JONOR

excellent

lsatenstein
22nd March 2017, 05:28 PM
Gnome works just fine for me. I use the xorg interface. When Gnome ran slow, I ran top from the terminal mode. I discovered firefox was chewing up the cpu. I quit firefox, and still, top showed firefox chewing up the cpu.
I logged out, returned and without firefox, the system was just fine. My system dates from 2008.
After some updates to Firefox 52.0, I have had no bad experience with Gnome.

JONOR
25th March 2017, 02:13 PM
A report suggests (http://www.networkworld.com/article/3184424/linux/gnome-324-new-linux-desktop-is-fast-responsive.html) Gnome 3.24 is snappy. Hope it's true, could make a huge difference to Linux appeal if so.