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cgrif
16th December 2014, 11:57 PM
HI All

I have a fresh install of Fedora 21 with a few additional repos added.
Gnome software will not show any updates, nor can I use it to look at installed software. What is the right way to debug this?

Many thanks,

Chris

exploder91
17th December 2014, 02:36 AM
You could try "yum clean all" after su in a terminal and see if that helps.You can also, use su, then "yum update" to get you system updated.

You can install yumex to display all installed packages.

cgrif
17th December 2014, 04:19 PM
Mysteriously last night it started working. Must've sensed I was posting on the forum and decided to straighten up. Hmmpf

BBQdave
17th December 2014, 11:06 PM
Mysteriously last night it started working. Must've sensed I was posting on the forum and decided to straighten up. Hmmpf

Not sure if I am fully understanding your question, but gSoftware automatically updates in the background. Basically, it will give you a message when updates are available, and you can choose to udpate now (usually with a reboot) or update later.

With F21 Workstation (Gnome 3) all functions well with gSoftware and default Fedora repos + rpmfusion free - have not tested rpmfusion nonfree. All installation and updating through gSoftware, have not used YUM for updating.

sidebrnz
17th December 2014, 11:09 PM
One of the things I like about Linux is the fact that most updates don't need you to reboot. Why does Gnome force this?

[joe@khorlia ~]$ uptime
14:08:37 up 29 days, 23:38, 2 users, load average: 0.77, 0.67, 0.61

BBQdave
18th December 2014, 01:06 AM
One of the things I like about Linux is the fact that most updates don't need you to reboot. Why does Gnome force this?

I am curious about that too. With Ubuntu Unity 14.04LTS, no need for reboot, unless it is a kernel update - even then, you can wait and choose when to reboot.

Fedora Workstation (Gnome 3) updating is similar to osX. Is that a style choice, or is there an advantage to have updating in the background - with update install during reboot?

For me, it does not really matter - as with both Gnome 3 & Unity you can choose when to update. And after updating I reboot my notebook.

RahulSundaram
18th December 2014, 04:01 AM
Hi

A number of applications including Firefox act strangely if you update without restarting them. It is a altogether common myth that you only need reboots for kernel updates. Lots of libraries etc stay in memory unless you restart the associated applications and this is a problem when you are dealing with security updates or one of the several applications which don't like files being swapped out behind their back. Try out needs-restarting utility which tries to detect this. If you really know what you are doing, you can just disable automatic update prompts and just do it using yum/dnf when you want to.

sidebrnz
18th December 2014, 04:22 AM
Well, yes, if there's an update that affects a program, that program needs to restart. However, that's what needs-restarting is for. Simply assuming that all updates require rebooting is part of Windows, not Linux.

RahulSundaram
18th December 2014, 04:48 AM
Hi

Are you actually suggesting that after an update, an user should run a utility to figure out which applications to restart? What about a library update?

sidebrnz
18th December 2014, 04:57 AM
My understanding is that needs-restarting will catch that as it will often tell me that programs need to be restarted that weren't directly updated. The one thing it won't do is tell you if you really do need to reboot because something used by your kernel was updated. It doesn't need root to run, but if you don't you'll get a bunch of unimportant warnings about it trying to access places that a normal user shouldn't be. (That may have been fixed by now, but if so, I haven't heard about it.) You can get it from the standard repos as part of yum-utils.

RahulSundaram
18th December 2014, 05:00 AM
Hi

You can't really expect a user running a graphical updater to run a command line utility and restart apps one by one. That's awful UI and not terribly efficient either. It is just far more easier for workstation/desktop users to run the updates when they are restarting. If you want to run the utility in the command line, you might as well as be using yum/dnf and don't use the graphical updater at all.

lsatenstein
18th December 2014, 02:37 PM
HI All

I have a fresh install of Fedora 21 with a few additional repos added.
Gnome software will not show any updates, nor can I use it to look at installed software. What is the right way to debug this?

Many thanks,

Chris

Sometimes we wonder if Gnome is dead, or if the system is dead. But then, suddenly things come alive.

I have noted that after a certain number of power/on power/off cycles, Linux begins a diskcheck. You are not advised that it is in process, and the system appears dead. Before you try by rebooting, check the disk busy light on your laptop or desktop. If it shows activity, just be patient and wait.

When that diskcheck is complete, the rest of Linux and of course, Gnome will start up as expected.

BBQdave
18th December 2014, 03:58 PM
Lots of libraries etc stay in memory unless you restart the associated applications and this is a problem when you are dealing with security updates or one of the several applications which don't like files being swapped out behind their back.

Thanks RahulSundaram for the information. From far back in the day (redhat Linux 8 & Mac os9) I've always rebooted after updates. And I update with all applications closed. Probably old school, but I have no troubles with updating :)

sidebrnz
18th December 2014, 07:42 PM
One comment about needs-restarting. There are times that updating one helper program means that one or more other programs need to be restarted to use the new version, and it's not always obvious which ones they are. If, like me, you don't like rebooting unless you really need to, this is a good way to find out just what needs to be done to tidy up after an update.