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DougHuffman
5th August 2013, 05:39 PM
Are there particular risks in using 'yum update --skip-broken' by default?

dswaner
5th August 2013, 09:37 PM
I've been running "yum update --skip-broken" for years as a daily cron job and never had a problem. I also first run yum update on yum, yum-utils, and rpm -- don't know if that's really necessary, but it can't hurt.

vallimar
6th August 2013, 01:36 PM
Are there particular risks in using 'yum update --skip-broken' by default?
As long as you aren't using updates-testing, then not really, no.


I also first run yum update on yum, yum-utils, and rpm -- don't know if that's really necessary, but it can't hurt.
That doesn't really do anything for you. It's only advisable if you are changing versions.
Upgrading from F18 -> F19 for example. But that is an experienced users only type thing
to do an upgrade manually by hand. Most people should probably not attempt it.

Gareth Jones
7th August 2013, 04:47 PM
I agree with vallimar on both points.

“--skip-broken” is generally harmless (anything that would be broken is skipped after all). However, if a problem that requires you to use --skip-broken isn’t resolved within a couple of working days, it might mean that you need to do something else, whether that is to check your Yum repository configuration, or report a bug to the repository/package maintainers.

The main risk of using it by default is that you might not notice problems that become an issue later.

lsatenstein
7th August 2013, 06:16 PM
Are there particular risks in using 'yum update --skip-broken' by default?

Doug, the short answer is NO.

The long answer is that yum checks for co-requisites, and pre-requisites, and needs to verify that accompanying or other the software is at or above the minimal version number. If there is software from some other place with the same name, even if it is more recent, YUM will not do an install of your program.

--skip-broken says, don't stop yum because this application is broken, so, go onto the next permitted update.

At times (default rule) you want to install a dozen libraries to be able to do something. but if anyone of the needed ones is "broken or missing", the installation of all of the files should fail. However, if the applications being installed are independent of each other, --skip-broken will do just that.

DougHuffman
8th August 2013, 12:44 PM
The main risk of using it by default is that you might not notice problems that become an issue later.It is this logic that suggests that I not use skip-broken. I need to see the normal operation and messages. If there is a problem, then a problem override is available. Thanks all for the guidance.