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bob
31st July 2013, 11:24 PM
As of 30th July 2013, Fedora 17 has reached its end of life for updates and support. No further updates, including security updates, will be available for Fedora 17. A previous reminder was sent on July 3rd [0]. Fedora 18 will continue to receive updates until approximately one month after the release of Fedora 20. The maintenance schedule of Fedora releases is documented on the Fedora Project wiki [1]. The Fedora Project wiki also contains instructions [2] on how to upgrade from a previous release of Fedora to a version receiving updates. Cheers, Dennis Gilmore

solo2101
1st August 2013, 03:35 PM
well... there goes another good version... :(

jonnycat
2nd August 2013, 03:24 PM
well... there goes another good version... :(

Aye, 17 has been very good to me, and I really don't want to fight with the Anaconda mess to get another Fedora version.

RIP F17. :(

Reisswolf
6th August 2013, 06:21 AM
Methinks this has surely been discussed somewhere, but given that most "serious" pieces of software--please don't ask me to define what that means--can take 18 months or more to conceive and bring to production, how do other people here handle software development on Fedora? Do you simply update to the latest version and hope that everything will work? Or do you use a different distribution, perhaps a long-term one with a penchant for alliterative names?

CronoCloud
6th August 2013, 12:41 PM
Or do you use a different distribution, perhaps a long-term one with a penchant for alliterative names?

Well, there's always RHEL and CentOS.

CronoCloud

Reisswolf
6th August 2013, 08:11 PM
Both excellent distributions, and would have been my primary choices but for the fact that their repositories don't always have the latest versions of the packages. And I am someone who prefers to install packages (almost) exclusively through the package manager and keep manual installations down to a minimum. (Opera is the only exception I can point to.)

CentOS and Red Hat are still using 2.x kernels. It says clearly on Red Hat's page that kernel upgrades should only be done through yum. But the repositories don't have the latest kernels. (I would have thought that Debian's use of kernel 3.2 would be suuficient to establish the stability and viability of the newer kernels.)

Another problem is that the repositories don't have version 4 of OCaml, my primary language on Linux (along with C). There have been a few upgrades to the language from version 3.12; these are not present in the repositories.

Otherwise, I would have almost certainly used CentOS.

But until then, Fedora and Ubuntu will have to suffice.

jonnycat
6th August 2013, 11:35 PM
Both excellent distributions, and would have been my primary choices but for the fact that their repositories don't always have the latest versions of the packages. And I am someone who prefers to install packages (almost) exclusively through the package manager and keep manual installations down to a minimum.

That is exactly why I originally chose Fedora, and why I am reluctant to change.

jpollard
6th August 2013, 11:38 PM
Both excellent distributions, and would have been my primary choices but for the fact that their repositories don't always have the latest versions of the packages. And I am someone who prefers to install packages (almost) exclusively through the package manager and keep manual installations down to a minimum. (Opera is the only exception I can point to.)

CentOS and Red Hat are still using 2.x kernels. It says clearly on Red Hat's page that kernel upgrades should only be done through yum. But the repositories don't have the latest kernels. (I would have thought that Debian's use of kernel 3.2 would be suuficient to establish the stability and viability of the newer kernels.)

Another problem is that the repositories don't have version 4 of OCaml, my primary language on Linux (along with C). There have been a few upgrades to the language from version 3.12; these are not present in the repositories.

Otherwise, I would have almost certainly used CentOS.

But until then, Fedora and Ubuntu will have to suffice.

Not just that... the latest kernels have changes that make the older versions of KVM/VMware/Xen user space tools fail.

Gareth Jones
7th August 2013, 05:51 PM
There’s also Rawhide, if you’re doing software development and want to ensure that your code works with the latest releases.

Ultimately, if you’re doing Linux development and want to target more than one distribution (or version), you (or at least your team) will need to be prepared to work with multiple installations anyway.