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Dan
9th November 2012, 04:48 PM
Getting a little bored with some of the cookie-cutter theme concepts in fedora recently? Yeah. Me too. I suppose there's nothing wrong with that sort of goose-stepping conformity ... it's just not exactly my cup of tea. Not in things linux, anyway. (Or most things in life, as a matter of practice.) <..:Y..>

That doesn't mean, however, that I'm not prone to getting a little lock-jawed on some concepts, and dragging them to ground and chewing on them long past the beaten-into-pink-frothy-slime stages of the operation. <..:blink:..> <..:fp:..>

So it has been with things themed in fedora, and particularly with F16. It also seems somehow sadly appropriate that I wouldn't get around to finishing those themeing chores until right about he same time the release I'm currently working on is slated to go EOL. <..:rolleyes:..>

And ... to be strictly honest, the idea of themeing Plymouth was purely vaporware until I finished building the Fedora Deathstar (http://forums.fedoraforum.org/showthread.php?t=271298) wallpaper, and the long stack of layers in the GIMP layers window suggested an animation. So I built it as an animated gif. But ... given the palette restrictions in gifs, it worked, but it worked ugly.


Figure-1 gif animation
http://www.zyloo-enterprises.com/storage/temp/forum/animated-fedora-4-600.gif

It was kinda interesting, but almost as useful as a floppy drive mounted on a roasted chicken. <..http://forums.fedoraforum.org//forum/images/icons/icon6.gif..>


Then ... epiphany! Why not a Plymouth theme?!

And so ...

If you want to try moon-zap, aka fedora-world, as root, download and then unpack this (www.zyloo-enterprises.com/storage/temp/lunacy/fedora-world.tar.gz) into /usr/share/plymouth/themes/

Then: (as root)

# plymouth-set-default-theme fedora-world --rebuild-initrd

That will take a few minutes to complete, even on a fast system. Just patiently wait until it gets done. Then close the terminal when the cursor re-appears.

As long as nothing blew up or the invading aliens didn't mind-wipe your entire system in the process, the next time you boot up, Moon Zap should have taken the place of the default filling fedora bubble. (charge theme) <..:dance:..>

Then ... if you are completely horrified by what you have done, you can return to the sad group-think comforts of conformity by:


# plymouth-set-default-theme charge --rebuild-initrd

One last word of warning. Before you attempt this, make sure you have and understand the skills needed to remove rhgb from the kernel line on the fly (in grub) so you can boot up to fix it if something fails. That being said, if something fails, you will boot up just fine, but you'll get the old three color advancing bar on the bottom during boot.

That should do it. Have fun and ... be careful. <..:p..>

.

Dan
9th November 2012, 08:58 PM
If anyone else has tried this, I invite you to post and let me know how it worked out.

Yellowman
9th November 2012, 09:41 PM
I was going to comment but I decided to spare your feeling :)

Dan
9th November 2012, 09:42 PM
Duly noted. Thanks! <..:)..>

But did it work?

Yellowman
9th November 2012, 09:45 PM
Duly noted. Thanks! <..:)..>

But did it work?


I haven't used plymouth for ages and didn't test it.
I was just pulling your chain

Dan
9th November 2012, 09:47 PM
Aha! Ok.

<..;)..>

LongTimeDabbler
10th November 2012, 06:32 PM
I did this Dan. And it worked. Just a couple of comments/questions.

I didn't know right away that your initrd file is another way of
specifying your initramfs file. They are really two ways of saying
the same thing, right?

Also when the computer first comes up for air I get a static shot of one of your pngs,
then I get the BIOS screen, and then I get grub menu, and then I get your animation.
(I also see the Nvidia logo just before gnome since I'm using Nvidia video driver).

But I was wondering why the static view of the png shows up as the very first thing, before
the BIOS and before grub. It almost seems contradictory that something could show up
before the BIOS but it does.

Dan
10th November 2012, 06:57 PM
I did this Dan. And it worked. Just a couple of comments/questions.

I didn't know right away that your initrd file is another way of
specifying your initramfs file. They are really two ways of saying
the same thing, right? Uhm, if I understand the question correctly, no. Pablo and I had a fairly lengthy discussion about this, and as it truns out, I think the Plymouth initrd is a separate file. It does not necessarily involve the initramfs file. But I'll readily admit I am no expert in this area.


Also when the computer first comes up for air I get a static shot of one of your pngs,
then I get the BIOS screen, and then I get grub menu, and then I get your animation.
(I also see the Nvidia logo just before gnome since I'm using Nvidia video driver).

But I was wondering why the static view of the png shows up as the very first thing, before
the BIOS and before grub. It almost seems contradictory that something could show up
before the BIOS but it does.Seemingly Contradictory indeed! However, there is a simple explanation. What you are seeing is in fact two processes. The first appearance is not actually part of the boot up. It's part of the previous session's shut down.

Then the system shuts down, and on reboot, goes through the stages of: BIOS, CMOS, Grub, initramfs + Plymouth (concurrent), X11 startup (Nvidia screen) then GDM, then after you log in, Gnome Shell (or your chosen DE/WM).

LongTimeDabbler
10th November 2012, 07:06 PM
Uhm, if I understand the question correctly, no. Pablo and I had a fairly lengthy discussion about this, and as it truns out, I think the Plymouth initrd is a separate file. It does not necessarily involve the initramfs file. But I'll readily admit I am no expert in this area.


Well when I ran the initrd command it caused a new version of initramfs to appear
as judging by timestamp. Also a "locate initrd" came up not empty but mostly showed
some header files that were kernel version specific. It sure seemed to me that the
initrd command in fact, caused a new initramfs file to be built. I'm no expert either,
however.




Seemingly Contradictory indeed! However, there is a simple explanation. What you are seeing is in fact two processes. The first appearance is not actually part of the boot up. It's part of the previous session's shut down.

Then the system shuts down, and on reboot, goes through the stages of: BIOS, CMOS, Grub, initramfs, Plymouth, X11 startup (Nvidia screen) then GDM, then after you log in, Gnome Shell (or your chosen DE/WM).

I think you are exactly right here. I was monkeying around with plymouth by running
plymouth --show-splash as detailed here (not recommended)

https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/Plymouth

This locked up my system tighter than <insert your favorite metaphor here> and
I had to hard reboot. That time I no longer saw the static png. So this explanation
makes good sense to me.

Dan
10th November 2012, 07:15 PM
Well when I ran the initrd command it caused a new version of initramfs to appear
as judging by timestamp. Also a "locate initrd" came up not empty but mostly showed
some header files that were kernel version specific. It sure seemed to me that the
initrd command in fact, caused a new initramfs file to be built. I'm no expert either,
however.<..:blink:..>

Huh?! That's what I initially thought, but re-checked, and last time I ran it, the initramfs file didn't change.

Uh, oh! Back to the drawing board. Something ain't right in Rome!

EDIT: *Sigh!* Now more trouble.

On the big desktop (daily driver)
# plymouth-set-default-theme fedora-world --rebuild-initrd
grubby fatal error: unable to find a suitable template


Seems my holdover legacy grub.conf pooched the process. <..:rolleyes:..>

Dan
10th November 2012, 07:19 PM
Posts move to appropriate thread.

PabloTwo
10th November 2012, 07:35 PM
@LongTimeDabbler -

Compare the timestamps of your /boot/initramfs........img file(s) and /boot/initrd-plymouth.img file. I think you'll see the initrd-plymouth.img file is newer. There is no "initrd" command, at least not on F16. There is a "mkinitrd" command, which has nothing to do with Plymouth.

The option "--rebuild-initrd" to the "plymouth-set-default-theme" command causes a rebuild of the /boot/initrd-plymouth.img file.

If you care to not see the Nvidia splash, you can add this to your xorg.conf "Device" section:

Option "NoLogo" "true"

LongTimeDabbler
10th November 2012, 07:41 PM
But hold on - I basically don't have an "initrd" file. Just an initramfs file.
Which is the one with the updated timestamp.


{1:37pm 0 W520-fedora} /boot > ls -al *3.6.5*
-rw-r--r--. 1 root root 122050 Oct 31 15:41 config-3.6.5-1.fc17.x86_64
-rw-------. 1 root root 37830383 Nov 10 12:24 initramfs-3.6.5-1.fc17.x86_64.img
-rw-------. 1 root root 2506237 Oct 31 15:41 System.map-3.6.5-1.fc17.x86_64
-rwxr-xr-x. 1 root root 4839968 Oct 31 15:41 vmlinuz-3.6.5-1.fc17.x86_64
{1:37pm 0 W520-fedora} /boot > ls *initrd*
ls: No match.


Right when I said "initrd" command I really meant the plymouth command that
caused the file to be rebuilt - the --rebuilt-initrd to the plymouth command. Just
did that to save some keystrokes.

PabloTwo
10th November 2012, 08:16 PM
Maybe somethings different in F17 than F16, which is what I run.

plymouth-0.8.4-0.20110822.6.fc16.x86_64

BASH:~/-> ll /boot/init*
-rw-------. 1 root root 17789727 Oct 20 16:34 /boot/initramfs-3.6.2-1.fc16.x86_64.img
-rw-------. 1 root root 17885614 Nov 5 10:01 /boot/initramfs-3.6.5-2.fc16.x86_64.img
-rw-------. 1 root root 17880761 Nov 9 16:12 /boot/initramfs-3.6.6-1.fc16.x86_64.img
-rw-r--r--. 1 root root 298579 Sep 25 16:06 /boot/initrd-plymouth.img

---------- Post added at 02:16 PM ---------- Previous post was at 01:48 PM ----------

OK, I must eat a bit of crow. I had to test this for myself, just now.

BASH:~/-> sudo plymouth-set-default-theme charge --rebuild-initrd
BASH:~/-> ll /boot/init*
-rw-------. 1 root root 17789727 Oct 20 16:34 /boot/initramfs-3.6.2-1.fc16.x86_64.img
-rw-------. 1 root root 17885614 Nov 5 10:01 /boot/initramfs-3.6.5-2.fc16.x86_64.img
-rw-------. 1 root root 18216365 Nov 10 14:11 /boot/initramfs-3.6.6-1.fc16.x86_64.img <= changed
-rw-r--r--. 1 root root 298579 Sep 25 16:06 /boot/initrd-plymouth.img <= not changed
Yes, current running kernel initramfs image file was altered, not the initrd-plymouth.img file. Compare to my post above. I would hazard a guess that somewhere along the line an update to plymouth deprecated the /boot/initrd-plymouth.img file in favor of sticking things directly into the kernels initramfs....img file. That seems to be confirmed by the fact that the kernel initramfs..img file grew larger after doing the theme change command.

Skull One
10th November 2012, 08:16 PM
You really are an artist Dan ! :)
I think that you could enhance a little the appearance of the 'fedora death star' using the mapping function of gimp:
http://docs.gimp.org/en/plug-in-map-object.html

I have not tried it, but the result must be smoother.

Happy theming !

Dan
10th November 2012, 09:00 PM
Just gave it a try. It works pretty well, although it tends to pixelate some. I think I'd seen it there in the GIMP, and I may actually remember to use it now. Previously I used the mapping tool in OpenOffice Draw.

LongTimeDabbler
10th November 2012, 09:33 PM
Interesting discussion - always good to get under the hood and poke around.

sea
15th January 2013, 11:23 PM
Works great Dan!
Well, on the netbook if just matches the screen perfectly.
But on the laptop, its just fills .

Dan
12th March 2013, 10:19 PM
Dan strikes again.

This one isn't a completed work yet, but it could be. Seems the more I tried to complicate it, the less I liked it. So simple it is. I need ... victims.

I'm not next to a box I can install it on right now, so I need some lab rats. That being said, there are no guarantees. Your lunch may get stolen and your girlfriend might run off with a jazz drummer. So proceed at your own risk.

Here's the DL location (www.zyloo-enterprises.com/storage/temp/forum/spherical-pulse.tar.gz).

Unpack it and save it to:
/usr/share/plymouth/themes/

Then: (as root)

# plymouth-set-default-theme spherical-pulse --rebuild-initrd

That will take a few minutes to complete. As before, patiently wait until it gets done. Then close the terminal when the cursor re-appears.

If everything worked, the next time you boot up, Spherical Pulse should have taken the place of the default filling fedora bubble. (charge theme).


As normal, feedback is appreciated.


For those with Nvidia cards and the Nvidia driver, this might help.

http://forums.fedoraforum.org/showpost.php?p=1626349&postcount=5

And this should fix any font problems during the build.

http://forums.fedoraforum.org/showpost.php?p=1626389&postcount=7

Dmeadows
13th March 2013, 04:12 AM
Gave it a try, Dan. Went thru the motions but still have the filling bubble theme. Do get a big circle with the fedora 'f' in the upper left corner of my screen that wasn't there before on shutdown. And no harm done to system!

Dan
13th March 2013, 04:18 AM
Hmmmm.

Ok. That's the same thing I just got on my 32 bit F18 install. Oddly enough, pretty much the opposite on the F16 laptop. <..:blink:..>

The animation is in two parts. The progress portion, and the throbber portion. You got the throbber working, and I've got the progress part in the laptop.

I'm hoping it's not the size of the graphic that's borking it. <..:(..>




Back to the drawing board.

Dan
14th March 2013, 08:05 PM
Well ... A simple re-install on the F18 32 bit box fixed the deal right up. Spherical Pulse is working fine there, both the startup and shutdown animations are doing exactly what they should. (nouveau)

The startup part works fine, but the shut down animation is still not responding to the change in the Toshiba. (64 bit, SSD, F16 -- Intel ) So I get a beautiful Spherical-Pulse startup, and a nasty little fedora charge bubble on shutdown. Ah, well. Could be worse, I suppose. <..:rolleyes:..>

Dan
4th April 2014, 10:15 PM
The fast and dirty fix for the above two-part problem boiled down to an updated kernel solving the issue. Now both startup and shutdown have the new animation correctly displayed. My guess is the new kernel forced a more complete rebuild.