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Riff Gaffer
24th March 2010, 10:31 AM
So I'm thoroughly confused.

I'm looking at rebuilding a spare machine (2800 dual core pentium with 2 gigs of ram) and I'm unable to decide whether to go for a dual boot or for a virtual environment.

I've read a fair bit and the pros and cons have often gotten a bit heated under the collar it seems. There seems to be a number of people with an agenda when it comes to this subject (not pointing fingers here I should be clear.)

Since FC12 is my "core" system - I thought I'd get the opinion of you worthy peoples.

SlowJet
24th March 2010, 10:49 AM
Well, it's not really a heat argument as it depends on the hardware's resources and what you are using the OS's for.
Here's my take.
1. If you just want 2 or 3 systems like Windows, Fedora and some third system (Ubuntu, Fedora+1) then dual booting is probably a good choice.

2. Virtual OS needs lots of cpu and the vt tech makes it run much better, but
A. Virtualbox has limits on the newess of the host kerenl (and sometimes the guest kernel) version. Mainly, only finished stable version, which limit using Vbox for test Linux's)
But Vbox is super easy to ue.

3. The Fedora virt would be good to learn if you only want to use fedora guests.
Since I can't use Vbox for testing most of the time and my distro hopping days are over I would eventually use this method.

Sj

P.S. The word Core does not apply anymore. fc12...rpm the c stands for something else now. If you continue to use the word Core it could get heated. :)

forkbomb
24th March 2010, 11:25 AM
What are you looking to do in the guest machines? It really depends on what you want to do with the VMs. Don't expect high-performance graphics rendering in guest VMs. And, of course, memory and CPU resources have to be shared between host and any guests you're running. EDIT: That's to say nothing about the very real potential for excessive disk thrashing if you're running many VMs.

Maximizing the possible performance of virtual machines usually involves eliminating host operating system overhead, typically via bare-metal virtualization like VMware ESX or specifically tailoring a Linux distro for the express purpose of headlessly running, e.g., xen.


P.S. The word Core does not apply anymore. fc12...rpm the c stands for something else now. If you continue to use the word Core it could get heated. :)
I always thought the unofficial grapevine position was that "fc12" in rpm filenames was due to the devs being too lazy to switch things over. :p It is odd, though. Fedora hasn't been officially called Fedora Core for about half of its history, and it's still informally being called "Fedora Core."

jamesph
24th March 2010, 11:52 AM
In my home - office printer setup, we are using dual boot system. For Printing purposes we use linux, and when printer is not used, we can boot windows for other purposes. Your selection will depend on your use, as rightly said VM will eat up your memory and that will have impact on what you need.

bodhi.zazen
24th March 2010, 06:30 PM
So I'm thoroughly confused.

I'm looking at rebuilding a spare machine (2800 dual core pentium with 2 gigs of ram) and I'm unable to decide whether to go for a dual boot or for a virtual environment.

I've read a fair bit and the pros and cons have often gotten a bit heated under the collar it seems. There seems to be a number of people with an agenda when it comes to this subject (not pointing fingers here I should be clear.)

Since FC12 is my "core" system - I thought I'd get the opinion of you worthy peoples.

I have not seen these conversations become "heated" , lol.

The advantage of Virtualization is that you may run multiple OS at the same time. The disadvantage is that it does not directly use you hardware so you do not directly access your video card for example.

Virtualization is a broad topic, so it depends on what you are hoping to use it for. Are you just wanting to test drive an .iso ? Are you wanting to isolate a server ? run games ? just try Fedora ? Development ?

forkbomb
24th March 2010, 07:53 PM
I have not seen these conversations become "heated" , lol.
That's what those KDE vs. GNOME threads are for. :p

bodhi.zazen
24th March 2010, 08:04 PM
That's what those KDE vs. GNOME threads are for. :p

hahahaha !!!

Riff Gaffer
25th March 2010, 02:03 AM
That's what those KDE vs. GNOME threads are for. :p

I'll let you keep that can of worms closed! :)

Ok thanks for the input thus far peoples, some great info.

I guess to elaborate, I have a spare PC - and I'm interested in running an old version of Win (probably 98) so I can play my old but favourite games, and maybe Ubuntu and/or CentOS.

This machine is nice and stable so I will stick with Fedora I think

From the info here, I'm definitely thinking multi-boot is the way to go. I'm definitely NOT into testing or bleeding edge stuff. I'm learning the various flvours of Linux. I've used Ubuntu for about a year, as a low level user, just desktop stuff, minimal command line stuff. I'd like to progress the knowledge I have and I've always leant towards the Red Hat spawns rather than others. I'm currently learning SQL - with a distinct leaning towards MySQL (or probalby MariaDB now) and I want a secure environment for that so I'll probably set up a LAMP on this Fed 12 box.

bodhi.zazen
25th March 2010, 02:15 AM
With an older box, which I interpret as a slower CPU and low RAM, and your interest in games, I think dual booting is your best option.

forkbomb
25th March 2010, 04:07 AM
...and your interest in games...Depends on how old the games are.

If the games in question require direct hardware rendering of the graphics, I wouldn't even bother. But as for old school Win98-era games that were usually, at best, 2d sprites? Probably doable.

Heck, if they're really of classic vintage, they might even be playable with dosbox. :D

yum info dosbox

EDIT:
Though WINE is hit or miss with semi-recent games, old school ones are often okay for WINE if you set WINE to emulate older versions with winecfg.

Riff Gaffer
25th March 2010, 01:26 PM
ok my machine isn't THAT old. It's a 2800 pentium and it's got a 7600GT card. From memory I built it arond 4 years back.

I got some great games I miss playing that just don't work in compat mode in XP, and I've never really got to grips with Wine. I'm talking games like Dungeon Keeper, Thief and Mech Warrior.

Maybe I'll make it dual boot with Ubuntu and keep this machine for Fedora & CentOS