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View Full Version : Crashed and died ... is it recoverable?



st0kes
13th December 2009, 10:44 PM
I've been running Fedora 12 for a few weeks on a laptop, and was just starting to get things the way I like it ... and last night as I was trying to unlock the screen using the fingerprint reader (which had always previously worked) the system became unresponsive and there was nothing I could do but push the power button. Now it will not boot up, I get one cursor flash when it's at the grub stage and then the screen goes dark, there is no hard disk activity. He's dead jim.

I'm a bit gutted and would like to recover this system if I can, rather than install something else over the top.

I booted using an ubuntu live cd and mounted the lvm, and got into the /var/log/messages. The last entries in there before it crashed and burned are as follows:


Dec 12 21:02:25 localhost kernel: fprintd[965]: segfault at 0 ip 0200fe57 sp bf97f060 error 4 in libfprint.so.0.0.0[2000000+31000]
Dec 12 21:02:25 localhost abrtd: Directory 'ccpp-1260651745-965' creation detected
Dec 12 21:02:25 localhost abrtd: Lock file '/var/cache/abrt/ccpp-1260651745-965.lock' is locked by process 967
Dec 12 21:02:25 localhost abrt: saved core dump of pid 965 to /var/cache/abrt/ccpp-1260651745-965/coredump (925696 bytes)
Dec 12 21:02:26 localhost abrtd: Getting local universal unique identification...
Dec 12 21:02:27 localhost abrtd: New crash, saving
Dec 12 21:02:27 localhost abrtd: Activation of plugin 'RunApp' was not successful: Plugin 'RunApp' is not registered
Dec 12 21:02:46 localhost kernel: [drm] TV-16: set mode NTSC 480i 0
Dec 12 21:02:46 localhost kernel: [drm] TV-16: set mode NTSC 480i 0
Dec 12 21:02:47 localhost kernel: [drm] TV-16: set mode NTSC 480i 0
Dec 12 21:02:47 localhost kernel: [drm] TV-16: set mode NTSC 480i 0
Dec 12 21:02:47 localhost kernel: [drm] TV-16: set mode NTSC 480i 0
Dec 12 21:02:47 localhost kernel: [drm] TV-16: set mode NTSC 480i 0
Dec 12 21:02:48 localhost kernel: [drm] TV-16: set mode NTSC 480i 0
Dec 12 21:02:48 localhost kernel: [drm] TV-16: set mode NTSC 480i 0
Dec 12 21:02:48 localhost kernel: [drm] DAC-6: set mode 20

I've had a poke around in the coredump files and found plenty of references to the fingerprint reader, pointing to that as the cause of the problem.

To me this is looking like a write off, but I have no idea how or why this happened, some sort of bug I suppose ... is there anyone out there that can offer any way out of this?

jbkt23
14th December 2009, 12:36 AM
So, when you say you got to the grub stage you get a blinking cursor. Did you ever edit grub so you had a choice of kernels to boot from? Does the ubuntu disc allow you the option to mount the system image read / write? If so, then I would recommend that you go to //boot/grub/ and open grub.conf in an editor, "nano" is one that is usually available that I use. In the grub.conf file comment out the hidden menu line with the # symbol:
# hiddenmenu

then make sure that the timeout line is 8 seconds

timeout=8

save and reboot. You may not get any further than before but it is a start.

st0kes
14th December 2009, 04:12 PM
Thanks for your suggestion. I didn't know the grub menu was hidden, it seems a bit stupid to me that this is the default and has a zero second timeout. During the setup I was asked if I wanted to set a grub password, now that seems completely pointless as the default is to hide the grub menu. I can't think of any advantages, all this does is make troubleshooting a failed bootup much more complex than it needs to be. What would happen if a bad kernel was rolled out to all users? A lot of novice users would give up at this point. Rant over ...

Back at the point, through the grub menu I was able to boot an older kernel. So it looks like the 2.6.31.6-166.fc12.i686 kernel will not boot on my laptop (HP nc6910p). Don't know why. And now I have lost confidence that any future fc12 kernels will also have this problem. At least I've been able to get in to copy my stuff to the network for a rebuild. :cool:

Cheers for your help.

jbkt23
15th December 2009, 01:40 AM
So what was the sequence of events leading up to the crash when you tried to use the fingerprint reader to log in.

How did you update to the latest kernel?
Was this crash on the reboot after the install?
What is the contents of grub.conf?
What is your hardware?

There is a rant somewhere else about fedora's default boot up and I am with you. But if you were a visitor to the forums from the beginning you would know that there were all these complaints about how long it took to boot up, and how windows was much faster. So the Devs decided at some point to not give grub any screen time. This as well as a lot of other tweaks that have made the boot up much quicker. I think they have succeeded and now a 5 sec boot screen would not be a detriment at all.

till next

marko
15th December 2009, 03:42 AM
Thanks for your suggestion. I didn't know the grub menu was hidden, it seems a bit stupid to me that this is the default and has a zero second timeout. During the setup I was asked if I wanted to set a grub password, now that seems completely pointless as the default is to hide the grub menu. I can't think of any advantages, all this does is make troubleshooting a failed bootup much more complex than it needs to be. What would happen if a bad kernel was rolled out to all users? A lot of novice users would give up at this point. Rant over ...

Cheers for your help.

Not really, all you have to do is press Esc key to get to the grub menu, it's not that hard.

cathrynm
15th December 2009, 03:55 AM
Interesting, my system also failed to reboot after the last upgrade to 2.6.31.6-166. For some reason the PAE kernel locked up on the 'black screen with the cursor' -- but then when I tried the PAEdebug of the same version # it came up fine. I had other stuff to do so I didn't track it down any father than this.

st0kes
15th December 2009, 11:23 AM
So what was the sequence of events leading up to the crash when you tried to use the fingerprint reader to log in.

How did you update to the latest kernel?
Was this crash on the reboot after the install?
What is the contents of grub.conf?
What is your hardware?

There is a rant somewhere else about fedora's default boot up and I am with you. But if you were a visitor to the forums from the beginning you would know that there were all these complaints about how long it took to boot up, and how windows was much faster. So the Devs decided at some point to not give grub any screen time. This as well as a lot of other tweaks that have made the boot up much quicker. I think they have succeeded and now a 5 sec boot screen would not be a detriment at all.

till next

Perhaps I am not like normal people, but it does not bother me whether my computer takes 10 seconds longer or not to boot compared to a windows computer.

I appreciate your continuation of this but I have reformatted now with another distro. I did accept updates without paying much attention to them, not sure if the kernel was in there or not.

My hardware is an HP 6910p laptop: http://h20000.www2.hp.com/bizsupport/TechSupport/DriverDownload.jsp?lang=en&cc=uk&prodNameId=3357378&taskId=135&prodTypeId=321957&prodSeriesId=3357377&lang=en&cc=uk&submit=%C2%BB


Not really, all you have to do is press Esc key to get to the grub menu, it's not that hard.

That doesn't work when grub has a 0 second timeout. I also disagree with your comment as you need to know about this feature to be able to use it.

leigh123linux
15th December 2009, 11:35 AM
Perhaps I am not like normal people, but it does not bother me whether my computer takes 10 seconds longer or not to boot compared to a windows computer.

I appreciate your continuation of this but I have reformatted now with another distro. I did accept updates without paying much attention to them, not sure if the kernel was in there or not.

My hardware is an HP 6910p laptop: http://h20000.www2.hp.com/bizsupport/TechSupport/DriverDownload.jsp?lang=en&cc=uk&prodNameId=3357378&taskId=135&prodTypeId=321957&prodSeriesId=3357377&lang=en&cc=uk&submit=%C2%BB



That doesn't work when grub has a 0 second timeout. I also disagree with your comment as you need to know about this feature to be able to use it.


I suppose you don't know about the F8 key for extra boot options for M$ O/S either ;)

st0kes
15th December 2009, 02:33 PM
I suppose you don't know about the F8 key for extra boot options for M$ O/S either ;)

Yep I do know about the F8 screen in Windows. 'Last Known Good' configuration never fixes any problem but 'safe mode' can be very handy (I've been using Windows a lot longer than Linux). I see your point that F8 is not advertised either, but in reply, how often do you want to boot an old kernel in Windows? :)

The point I was trying to make was, without a visual prompt how are you supposed to know a menu can be accessed (not that you could get to it anyway with a zero second timeout). That's why it is not easy ...

I understand this is probably the wrong place for this rant and you are all trying to defend Fedora but I am feeling argumentative today and I think I am right! :D

leigh123linux
15th December 2009, 02:45 PM
Yep I do know about the F8 screen in Windows. 'Last Known Good' configuration never fixes any problem but 'safe mode' can be very handy (I've been using Windows a lot longer than Linux). I see your point that F8 is not advertised either, but in reply, how often do you want to boot an old kernel in Windows? :)

The point I was trying to make was, without a visual prompt how are you supposed to know a menu can be accessed (not that you could get to it anyway with a zero second timeout). That's why it is not easy ...

I understand this is probably the wrong place for this rant and you are all trying to defend Fedora but I am feeling argumentative today and I think I am right! :D


Complain here :cool:

https://bugzilla.redhat.com/show_bug.cgi?id=541315

st0kes
15th December 2009, 06:14 PM
I've done that, thanks for redirecting my rant to the right location :)

I may as well contribute back to Red Hat rather than sounding off to you helpful people!