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hatewindows
10th December 2009, 08:59 PM
I've downloaded OpenOffice & google Chrome for my newly installed Fedora 12 through Firefox; two questions please:

1- What is the command line path where firefox places its downloads (download folder)?

2- What is the best way to install these two s/w for a fedora newbie like me?

Many thanks in advance for your help.

Joelg
10th December 2009, 09:13 PM
You can check the save location by going into edit, preferences and looking at the main tab.

To install, probably the easiest for open office is got to start yumex (yum extender) and search for it there. For Chrome, you should have an rpm that you downloaded, go to the terminal and become root. Then go to the folder where you have chrome saved, and type "rpm -iv google-chrome...rpm" fill in the proper file name..

I think that should work...

Joel

hatewindows
10th December 2009, 09:57 PM
Hi Joel -- Thanks for your help.

Sorry, but I don't know what yumex (yum extender) is and how to start it. However, I did find the downloaded openoffice package, it was sitting in /tmp, so I went ahead and unzipped and untared it. Below please find the files and directories I see once I cd to its folder. RPMS folder has lots of *.rpm, but the command "rpm --install *' insider this directory fails. At this point how should I proceed with OpenOffice installation; thanks.

[root@irvine OOO310_m19_native_packed-1_en-US.9420]# pwd;ls -l
/tmp/OOO310_m19_native_packed-1_en-US.9420
total 404
drwxrwxr-x. 5 root root 4096 2009-08-18 10:44 installdata
-rw-rw-r--. 1 root root 372970 2009-08-18 10:44 JavaSetup.jar
drwxrwxr-x. 2 root root 4096 2009-08-18 10:44 licenses
drwxrwxr-x. 2 root root 4096 2009-08-18 10:44 readmes
drwxrwxr-x. 4 root root 4096 2009-08-18 10:44 RPMS
-rwxrwxr-x. 1 root root 14623 2009-08-18 10:44 setup
-rwxrwxr-x. 1 root root 3925 2009-08-18 10:44 update
[root@irvine OOO310_m19_native_packed-1_en-US.9420]#

ozjd
10th December 2009, 10:31 PM
It is better to install OpenOffice from the Fedora repos than from their site. Use "Add and remove software" and search for OpenOffice.

Yumex is an alternative to Add and Remove Software and many people prefer it. You can install the same way as OpenOffice or in a terminal as root yum install yumex

dd_wizard
10th December 2009, 10:39 PM
There is one caveat with yumex, though... It's known to break kernel updates! If you prefer a gui, Add/Remove Software and Software Update are available in System > Administration. If you don't mind reading the man page on yum, it's not that hard to update/upgrade with command line yum. Until the kernel bug is fixed in yumex, I'm avoiding it.

dd_wizard

ozjd
10th December 2009, 10:54 PM
There is one caveat with yumex, though... It's known to break kernel updates! If you prefer a gui, Add/Remove Software and Software Update are available in System > Administration. If you don't mind reading the man page on yum, it's not that hard to update/upgrade with command line yum. Until the kernel bug is fixed in yumex, I'm avoiding it.

dd_wizard

What does it do? I'm running it on F12 KDE without noticing any problems.

Aloone
10th December 2009, 11:05 PM
It is better to install OpenOffice from the Fedora repos than from their site. Use "Add and remove software" and search for OpenOffice.
That's true.

I think this is a common mistake made by ex-Windows users because they assume Linux is like Windows when it isn't.

Hi hatewindows welcome to the forum.:)

As you probably know, on Windows, you download all the software from the respective vendor, and download updates from that vendor. Linux doesn't work like that: all the software is stored in once place, called a repository, when it can be downloaded and updated from.

I did the same thing on Ubuntu awhile ago and it didn't fully integrate with the desktop i.e. some of the icons were missing.

The only software you should install from sources other than the official Fedora repository and RPM Fusion is stuff that can't be found there. Software installed from Fedora repositories is configured and optimised to work with Fedora and will be updated with the rest of the system, unlike on Windows where you have to update all non-MS software separately. More later.

I've installed the following from non-Fedora sources:
DOSEmu - I couldn't find it from Fedora.
Cannon LBP-660 dirver - ditto.
Flash Plugin - can probably be found on RPM Fusion but I got it from Adobe before I learned about RPM Fusion; a site requiring Flash directed me to Adobe.

You'll probably next complain about not being able to watch videos or listen to music. This is because Fedora only want packages in their repository which are under a free and open source licence and are not affected by any patents. The trouble is many essential pieces of software required to play most video and audio files are either closed source or patented so is missing from the default installation. Open source formats do exist but aren't used by most DVDs and MP3 players.

Fortunately a group of people who live in a country not bound by patents have made their own repository for closed source software and potentially patent infringing software. Don't worry it's all freeware; non of it is pirate so you won't get arrested by using it.


Install RPM free and non-free (non-free just means not open source) repositories: Google for "RPM Fusion" download it, click on the package, enter your root password and it'll install. Try to play the file in Rythmbox or Movie Player or just click on it and it'll ask you if you want to download the codecs.

I had dependency problems with the codecs so I installed VLC which has them built-in and I suggest you do the same if you run into trouble.

hatewindows
11th December 2009, 01:51 AM
Joelg, ozjd, dd_wizard, and Aloone:

Thanks guys; I really appreciate everyone's help. I'll try your recommendations and will let you know what happens.

marcrblevins
11th December 2009, 02:26 AM
Since you are a beginner, you may want to go over this list:
http://www.mjmwired.net/resources/mjm-fedora-f11.html

Or if you want it automatically installed for you, try Autoten or Easylife.

You can search the forum for those packages.

hatewindows
11th December 2009, 04:09 AM
Alright guys, I'm all installed, but I did it thru the GUI (Administration ==> Add/Remove Software). I really like to just stick to the command line and learn Linux the old fashioned way. How would I've done all this from command line? Anyone?

Many thanks in advance; you guys are great.

ozjd
11th December 2009, 04:39 AM
From the command line as root to install
yum install packagename

If you don't know the packagename try
yum search keyword

Aloone
11th December 2009, 12:08 PM
Use the man command to find help.

In this case type man yum to get help with the package manager.

cogent coco
11th December 2009, 12:18 PM
you can download chrome from google's site ,then install it,

just doublse click the *.tar.gz file ,take easy!

smurffit
26th January 2010, 05:53 PM
It is better to install OpenOffice from the Fedora repos than from their site.

I disagree. OOo is crippled in the Fedora repos (cause of some patent issues). :(
I'm installing it always from their site but i would like to see them in a repo like remi or livna.

mohitgoyal
26th January 2010, 06:25 PM
google chrome can be easily installed .......
you just have to install google chrome for linux just by going to the link

http://www.google.com/chrome?platform=linux


Links to more linux software

http://funinlinux.blogspot.com/2010/01/common-software-for-linux-vlc-httpwww.html