PDA

View Full Version : new user to linux and fedora, a few questions if you dont mind



lunar_mind
30th July 2009, 04:44 AM
Hi, this's my first post here - Im new to fedora and also to linux, i had some questions if that's ok.

question 1 - I had 15 gigs of free space, i was ready to use some of it to install fedora, but for some reasons, the installer nagged me about this and that, until i basically gave up and gave it the whole 15 gigs to install on. i dont think i need 15 gigs for linux at this point, seeing as ive never been able to get it to a point where i can regularly use it. could someone please tell me how, or point me to a link, where i can learn to properly partition for linux? in plain, plain english. do i need just one 5 gig partition? i know mandriva wanted one swap, one root, one /, one something else etc. would it be better to prepare the partition(s) from within windows with acronis disk director?

question 2 - when i installed fedora, shortly a message popped up saying there were updates available, bugfixes, security etc - so i selected them all for download. my question is, did these updates refer to updates for software already installed on the system, and/or additional things i could install that were not yet on the system?? it sure seemed like alot to download, and with seeing japanese character sets etc, i just wondered if i was downloading the entire internet without knowing what i was doing.

question 3 - i noticed there are no desktop icons on my installation, is there some box i can tick somewhere to get them on there?

question 4 - i use a laptop, but an external monitor - both work, but on the monitor, there is about an inch of black all around the border, and i cant see the taskbar (forcing me to use the laptop screen). can i resolve this?

id appreciate some help - as much as id like to get away from windows, i just always find trying linux an exercise in frustration. i usually try it about once a year, work with it as best i can, then eventually go back to windows regrettingly, because i just have so much work to do that has absolutely no relevance to operating systems.

anyway, this is my try for this year, along with my usual yearly set of questions
if anyone can offer some help id appreciate it, maybe i can make a further go of it this year.

lun

Hlingler
30th July 2009, 05:06 AM
(1) http://optics.csufresno.edu/~kriehn/fedora/fedora_files/f11/installation/partitions.html
(2) Yes: those are all updates of already-installed software - welcome to the fast-paced world of Fedora.
(3) I'll leave this question for the GNOME gurus.
(4) This may be fixable - hardware info (graphics chipset & specs)? Off-hand, X11 may be trying to force matching resolutions on both monitors. Or maybe something else completely.

V

P.S. For a more "user-friendly" and "works out-of-the-box" distro, *bungtu may be a better choice than Fedora.

lunar_mind
30th July 2009, 05:35 AM
Hlinger, thanks for your thoughts and time. I've tried buntu, but actually don't care for it so much. Im actually not so concerned about what works perfectly out of the box, because rarely does anything - also, what good is it to be forced to use just whatever distro so happenes to work perfectly by default for you? I'd rather do a little work, and be able to choose my own distro (hence im here).

as regards the desktop icons, im on kde by the way.

thanks again!

Hlingler
30th July 2009, 05:54 AM
Im actually not so concerned about what works perfectly out of the box, because rarely does anything - also, what good is it to be forced to use just whatever distro so happenes to work perfectly by default for you? I'd rather do a little work, and be able to choose my own distro (hence im here).In that case, I'll say what I forgot to add above: welcome to Fedora and these forums!
as regards the desktop icons, im on kde by the way.I'm a KDE guy myself, but at the moment F11 is LXDE, so... what icons do you want/need ? You should be able, for example, to open that "Kickoff" Main Menu thingy, go to any Group => Application, and right-click on the launcher to see a context menu with: "Add to Desktop".

V

lunar_mind
30th July 2009, 06:16 AM
hlinger, thanks for the additional tips. now that ive got a little hard disk just for the purpose on testing distros, i can work in safety with partitioning, so i'm off to do that.

btw i was quite impressed how easily my wireless worked on the live cd and hard drive installation of fedora. i'd tried pclinuxos, ubuntu, kubuntu, pcbsd, dbsd, and i think a couple others, and of them all, only mandriva last night and fedora today has ever allowed me to use my wireless - when things start working in that respect it's easier to continue on, because you can jump online and research whatever problems you may be having from within the distro, rather than booting back and forth-that gets old quick.

i'll probably eventually be back with alot more questions :D

lunar_mind
30th July 2009, 09:47 AM
i was wondering if there's anyway to change the time format from 24 to 12 hour, i cant seem to find the settings for this.

also, regarding rpms, is there any type or rpm installer or handler etc? im having a hell of a time even getting an rpm installed, but then again, whats new?

leadgolem
30th July 2009, 11:01 AM
Right click on your date/time select preferences from the context menu. Under clock options you have 12 and 24 hour radio buttons.

Hlingler
30th July 2009, 11:04 AM
also, regarding rpms, is there any type or rpm installer or handler etc? im having a hell of a time even getting an rpm installedOpen a terminal window, and command:
su -
yum install yumex

You'll find YUMEX (Yum Extender) in the menus. It's a GUI front-end for Yum (the standard RPM updater/dependency-solver).

V

GCFreak
30th July 2009, 11:16 AM
You don't need yumex to install RPMs, all you need to do is double-click them and yum will install them. You usually don't need to download RPMs and THEN install them, especially if you get them from a yum repository, in that cause you can open PackageKit (if you don't have yumex installed) and search for the package you want.

lunar_mind
30th July 2009, 09:32 PM
Right click on your date/time select preferences from the context menu. Under clock options you have 12 and 24 hour radio buttons.


hi golem, thanks for your time - when i right click on my clock i dont have the option you described, i have 3 options: digital clock settings, panelts options, and remove this digital clock - none of which controls what i am seeking to. is this because im on kde and you gnome? or has this something to do with being logged in as root?

thanks again

lunar_mind
30th July 2009, 09:54 PM
You don't need yumex to install RPMs, all you need to do is double-click them and yum will install them. You usually don't need to download RPMs and THEN install them, especially if you get them from a yum repository, in that cause you can open PackageKit (if you don't have yumex installed) and search for the package you want.


i've installed yumex, but even before when i clicked the rpm for opera, the hourglass just came on for a minute, then nothing - unless it installed and didnt tell me nor put it in the menu (which would be odd)

now with yumex, same exact thing - i click it, hourglass, then nothing. all i wanna do is install opera for christ's sake.............


am i to understand that yumex is a replacemtn for the k package kit? is it preferable to use yumex rather than kpackagekit for installes,updates etc?


again, thanks, thanks for taking the time to answer the zillion questions i have no choice but to ask

marko
30th July 2009, 09:56 PM
That's your problem, you can't install Opera with yumex because it's not a valid package in the Fedora package system. Opera is a proprietary program, you'd have to get it from the opera web site.

http://www.opera.com/

yumex is an alternative to packagekit, it's not necessarily a replacement. I find yumex to be a lot less annoying than PackageKit, PackageKit tends to force updates on you, yumex has to be intentionally run by the user.

lunar_mind
30th July 2009, 10:12 PM
hey marko - thanks for your time. actually i downloaded the rpm from the opera website. maybe its installing and not telling me? lol, id never have thought this would still be so difficult, but i guess i have to suffer, before i succeed.

thanks for the thoughts on the spftware managers also

marko
30th July 2009, 10:17 PM
Ok, I just read the tail post #11, so you're not trying to use the yum network but just installing the rpm locally.
In that case try using yum localinstall as the root user:


su -
<password>
<change directory to where the rpm file is at>
yum localinstall opera.rpm


inserting your actual filename of course. You might need the --nogpgcheck flag since there would be
no key to match the signature in the file (or no signature in the opera file at all) because it's not a
Fedora rpm.

Hlingler
30th July 2009, 10:18 PM
If you downloaded the (correct) Opera RPM from the Opera web site, the easiest way to install it is from the command line: open up a terminal window and log in as root user:
su -

Type root user password when prompted, and press <ENTER> key. Then:
yum --nogpgcheck localinstall <insert-PATH-to-Opera-RPM>

V

lunar_mind
30th July 2009, 10:32 PM
what would the path be to a file that's just on the desktop?

by the way hlinger, regarding my missing desktop icons last night, now i realize, that home, trash etc were sitting on some type of clear, near-transparent holder type thing - at the top left it says

desktop folder
---------------------


i didnt like it so i closed it, thats when the icons vanished obviously lol. i have no idea what it is or what its for, but its got my home and trash icons, so i guess i best leave it.

thanks again

Hlingler
30th July 2009, 10:35 PM
what would the path be to a file that's just on the desktop?Probably: /home/<your-username>/Desktop/

Unless you're logged in to the desktop as root user (for which you get 50 lashes with a wet noodle); then it might be: /root/Desktop/

V

lunar_mind
31st July 2009, 12:09 AM
did it, got opera installed ;) thank you to everyone who helped. didnt know what i was typing or what the hell it meant, but it worked ;)

lunar_mind
31st July 2009, 12:11 AM
whats this nearly clear, transparent layer on top of the desktop with my home and trash icons on it? where can i read more about how it functions?

marko
31st July 2009, 12:40 AM
whats this nearly clear, transparent layer on top of the desktop with my home and trash icons on it? where can i read more about how it functions?

That's a KDE4 desktop plasmoid, a "plasmoid" is an invention of the KDE people and it is a software object that's designed for a particular job on the KDE system.
In your case that was a folder plasmoid, it allows you to see files and objects in a directory, in this case your home directory. This all happened because KDE4 is moving away from the cluttered old way (read windows) of people dumping tons of stuff on the Desktop. But some people wanted to get access to particular folders from the desktop so that plasma was created.

What is plasma:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Plasma_(KDE)

There are plasma objects for nearly anything you can imagine (disk access, network traffic, time and temperature, weather,...)

You can try lots of these by right clicking the KDE4 desktop, select 'unlock widgets' and then "add widgets". A widget window will come up and
offer some widgets to use (and it can get more off the network). When the desktop is in the unlocked mode
you can grab plasmoids and move them around. When you got things where you like them, hit the 'lock widgets' to keep them fixed.

I suppose wikipedia would be a good place to start:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kde4

lunar_mind
31st July 2009, 01:10 AM
mark - thank you so much, i will be doing some reading on that.

now, actually tonight, id like to try watching a movie from fedora and see how it does ;)

to do so, i need to install truecrypt, so i can unlock my external disk where my films are

secondly, i want to install vlc - the vlc site told me to grab it from rpm fusion, which i did, i downloadd the vlc rpm from there. this time when i clicked the rpm it started installing and downloading dependencies, but midway it encountered an error and closed.

can anyone advise as to how to get these 2 progs installed? hellllllllllp

lunar_mind
31st July 2009, 02:16 AM
actually i've got one down - the system had been updating some things so i restarted, after that, i reran the vlc installer and this time it installed without issue ;)

if someone could just help me get truecrypt working :D

marko
31st July 2009, 02:26 AM
It would probably be better to use a real package manager like yum or package kit
to install something that complicated instead of handling the raw rpm file(s), try using this page as a guide:

(especially see the Setup Yum, MP3 and Media player sections)
http://www.mjmwired.net/resources/mjm-fedora-f11.html (or go to whatever particular Fedora versions link on
the right side of the page).

Fedora doesn't just install that for you because it has a strict open license.
(Media and MP3 players use legally gray codecs and licenses.), but it's still pretty simple after you setup the rpmfusion repositories.

lunar_mind
31st July 2009, 06:01 PM
truecrypt users, could you tell me how to get it installed, or link me to a page with a guide? it would be nice to access my 350 gig encrypted partition from fedora.

also, on my external monitor, there's about a half inch border all around that's black, preventing me from seeing the taskbar (basically forcing me to use my laptop screen) does anyone know how i can begin troubleshooting this?

again, really i appreciate any help.

Hlingler
31st July 2009, 08:13 PM
Hi lunar_mind:

Although we strongly discourage multiple/cross-posting on questions, I believe that in this case, you would be better served to start a new thread(s) on each specific question/issue, since the the ones in your above post are literally buried in the pile here.

You may (and probably should) refer to my suggestion to do so when and if you start any new thread(s) on the truecrypt and/or external monitor issues.

Unfortunately, I cannot help with either question.

Good Luck,
V

lunar_mind
31st July 2009, 08:18 PM
hlinger, nonetheless your time and thoughts are appreciated :D

i imagine i will eventually get it worked out, theres no real hurry, plenty of time to be patient with it...

troyatlarge
31st July 2009, 08:33 PM
I don't know if you use the following guide or not - but in general it is well written and gets one through quite a large number of basic situations using Fedora 11. http://www.fedoraguide.info/index.php?title=Fedora11

I went to GNU/Linux after a bad time with Windows Millennium - it did take a little to learn the basics at first, but mostly it was just being scared of it to start with as these programmer folks have made it pretty much all pick and click on the surface. The thing I did, which helped my learning curve allot, was finally realize I was just keeping the Windows around as a crutch I used when I didn't want to learn how to do something via GNU/Linux. Upon seeing this I said the heck with it and installed only the GNU/Linux system and for better or worst, ground my way through whatever problem came up. I know that's not for everyone, but it sure worked wonders for me.

In any event, best to you with your Fedora efforts - I think your onto a darn good system, its well worth the time thinks I.

lunar_mind
31st July 2009, 10:47 PM
well, i got truecrypt installed, i did a forum search on it and found it was at rpmfusion, grabbed it and clicked it, it pulled down dependencies and installed fine! only now im having trouble accessing the volume once its mounted (i hope its not due to the fact the encrypted volume was created under windows) but thats another story and im on the original thread trying for help, but as regards the installation, no problem. thanks again.

troy, thanks for your time also :D