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sheepop39
11th July 2009, 02:23 PM
I recently installed Fedora 11 with KDE 4 on virtual box. Now I need to install the guest additions, and doing requires sudo, but I can't because whenever I try to install the guest additions in terminal by typing "sudo ./VBoxGuestAdditionsx86", it gives me this "User is not in the sudoers File" Anyone know what to do so I can get the guest additions installed.

marvin_ita
11th July 2009, 02:53 PM
Open a terminal, go to superuser (type "su", enter, then insert password for root user).
Then type "visudo", go to the end of file and add

USER ALL=(ALL) ALL
where "USER" is the username you use as standard user.
Save and quit, now should work.

sej7278
12th July 2009, 12:13 AM
sounds like you've been reading too many n00buntu tutorials!

just "su -" to become root, then install the additions, forget all that sudo crap.

scottro
12th July 2009, 12:30 AM
Using sudo can be quite useful. It is true that many folks coming to Fedora from Ubuntu or Ubuntu based distributions, run into this issue--one gets used to doing it a certain way.

Actually, it wouldn't shock me if Fedora winds up going that way.
Using sudo can be especially handy when you want to let a user do one thing, e.g., shutdown, but don't want to give them the root password.

sej7278
2nd August 2009, 09:58 PM
Actually, it wouldn't shock me if Fedora winds up going that way.
Using sudo can be especially handy when you want to let a user do one thing, e.g., shutdown, but don't want to give them the root password.

except with n00buntu, they don't setup /etc/sudoers, so *any* user can do *any* command using their *own* password, and there's no logging either iirc.

sudo is only a security *feature* if its setup correctly, and you can't just do "sudo -s" to get a root shell.

scottro
2nd August 2009, 11:07 PM
Wow, really? I thought it was only the first created user.

That is, if you create user scott and then create user sej, sej won't be able to use sudo for administrative purposes until user scott adds him to some group or another.

That's what I thought, but I haven't set up an Ubuntu machine with more than one user.

sej7278
2nd August 2009, 11:52 PM
Wow, really? I thought it was only the first created user.

That is, if you create user scott and then create user sej, sej won't be able to use sudo for administrative purposes until user scott adds him to some group or another.

That's what I thought, but I haven't set up an Ubuntu machine with more than one user.

well an additional user has to be added to the admin group, yes, but its still not great is it?

scottro
3rd August 2009, 12:00 AM
Hrrm, don't know if I can really fault that. For example, I set mine up for wheel users, so if I want someone to have unlimited rights, I specifically add them to the wheel group.

So, in this case, though I see your point, their way of doing it makes sense to me.