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manubellini
13th May 2009, 08:52 PM
(What, you were thinking I was joking? I wasn't!!!)
Hi, there's something wrong here... I posted here some messages about some backup applications, I received no answers.
(other closed source OSs have a decent backup application, although they don't work every time - Wow, I begin to understand, I haven't talked about Apple's Time Machine! Oops...)
Finally, I've found a nice program (with fast support, too), which is sbackup. It's the only program I was able to run (Oops, I forgot to try rdiff... There was a reason...), anyway it does its job. What a pity, it hasn't got some important enhancements like the backup device recognition, or a tray icon to check its status (I have to ps -A all day long)... These features have been submitted 2 years ago in the brainstorming at Sourceforge.
So, I was thinking people using Linux (and developers, of course) don't care at all about backup applications in Linux (for the desktop world). For me it's a fundamental feature, moreover third part applications for network HDDs have programs running on Windows and Macs only. Tell me you do!!!

pete_1967
13th May 2009, 10:10 PM
Backing up to NAT drive with rdiff and own script allowing uploads via ftp, burn occasional copies on discs and use regularly Subversion hosted on other server.

There are plenty of different backup applications to choose one to meet your requirements and haven't met one that doesn't work yet.

sideways
13th May 2009, 11:36 PM
I use xcopy (http://www.bbc.co.uk/dna/h2g2/A2054620) followed by compression with a lossless audio codec like monkey's audio (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Monkey%27s_Audio) or flac (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Free_Lossless_Audio_Codec).
Although I can hardly ever recover my system it keeps the fbi guessing and gives them sore ears after countless raids on my control center.

RupertPupkin
14th May 2009, 12:40 AM
I use floppy disks. 5.25" floppy disks. 1.2MB each.

sej7278
14th May 2009, 08:31 AM
i use a combination of rsync to my fileserver for my large data and websites and flyback the time machine clone for my home directory.

manubellini
14th May 2009, 12:39 PM
Mmm, these are the programs I found and the issues:
1)rdiff: no GUI, DWFM;
2)backup manager: same here;
2)rsync: what if I would need erased files, or a virus strikes my computer (what, for Linux there aren't? There aren't until you don't need them - moreover, there are also processor-based ones!)?
3)KBackup: I haven't found the way to make an incremental backup, even when I realized it was the default setting;
4)Fwbackup: I can't remember, I remember I didn't like it (maybe it was a GUI for rsync?);
5)Bacula: what is a GUI for if I have to set it up manually? Moreover, I didn't find it at first time with Gnome Package Manager. Anyway, it's not for desktop use;
6)sbackup: it has a GUI for the setup but not when it's running; I can't know neither what it's doing behind the scenes nor if it's doing something!

That's all. So am I right or not when looking for backup utilities for other OSs? I can't be peaceful when I don't have a copy of my files, because I know I'm not a god because my hard disk got broken!
(Rupert, I would need an alter ego to backup my 25 GB of data!)

sideways
14th May 2009, 01:56 PM
If you get your system to a really good state and want it saved, something as simple as:

dd if=/dev/sdaX bs=1M | gzip > /media/<USBDRIVE>/backup.gz &

will do it, where X is the partition you installed on. This can then be restored from a livecd session at any time. If backup.gz is less than 4Gb you can even create a self-contained LiveDVD with the backup image ( link (http://forums.fedoraforum.org/showpost.php?p=1092011&postcount=11) ). 'kill -USR1 $(pidof dd)' will track progress.

For incremental backups something more sophisticated is required. There are many backup solutions in the yum repositories, in F11, we have:


$ yum search backup | grep backup
=============================== Matched: backup ================================
BackupPC.noarch : High-performance backup system
amanda.i586 : A network-capable tape backup solution
amanda-client.i586 : The client component of the AMANDA tape backup system
amanda-devel.i586 : Libraries and documentation of the AMANDA tape backup system
amanda-server.i586 : The server side of the AMANDA tape backup system
backup-light.noarch : A small backup bash utility
backup-manager.noarch : A command line backup tool for GNU/Linux
bacula-client.i586 : Bacula backup client
coda-backup.i586 : Backup coordinator for the Coda distributed file system
dar.i586 : Software for making/restoring incremental CD/DVD backups
dirvish.noarch : Fast, disk based, rotating network backup system
duplicity.i586 : Encrypted bandwidth-efficient backup using rsync algorithm
fsarchiver.i586 : Safe and flexible file-system backup/deployment tool
fwbackups.noarch : A feature-rich user backup program
jpilot-backup.i586 : Enhanced backup plugin for J-Pilot
k9copy.i586 : Video DVD backup and creation program
nssbackup.noarch : (Not so) Simple Backup Suite for desktop use
pdumpfs.noarch : Daily backup system
pybackpack.noarch : User oriented backup and restore application
rdiff-backup.i586 : Convenient and transparent local/remote incremental
: mirror/backup
safekeep-client.noarch : The SafeKeep backup system (client component)
safekeep-common.noarch : The SafeKeep backup system (common component)
safekeep-server.noarch : The SafeKeep backup system (server component)
sbackup.noarch : Simple Backup Suite for desktop use
streamdvd.i386 : A fast tool to backup Video DVDs
thoggen.i586 : DVD backup utility


sbackup (https://help.ubuntu.com/community/BackupYourSystem/SimpleBackupSuite) seems a popular choice.

rsync is probably the most widely used by sysadmins, here's a nice guide http://www.mikerubel.org/computers/rsync_snapshots/

See also:
http://www.foogazi.com/2008/02/25/free-linux-backup-solutions/

(my xcopy comment was not completely flippant, it's how I used to backup windows machines at a company in the past, since you could specify the creation/modification date for the files to be backed up, daily backups were pretty simple)

manubellini
14th May 2009, 03:47 PM
Thanks very much for your help, but there's a misunderstanding: I want to say what I've already said in other posts, that is you can't say a switcher to write that command line. He'll say "I knew I had to stay with Windows" and throw the Fedora CD in the basket. Moreover there are about 25 applications in that list. I'm looking for a backup application since 6 months ago, isn't it better one working application than 25 useless ones? Most probably it's time for me to change distro, but elsewhere things will go the same way. Most probably, it's time to make my own distro!!!
Moreover I'm studying IT, I could "take advantage" the command line; I don't use it because I chose that subject to make easy-to-use applications!
Oops, all in all I think I'm wrong this time: no one will be worried about making the backup.

zackf
14th May 2009, 04:12 PM
I usually back up critical configs and docs, and figure when sometimes breaks it's a sign to upgrade anyway :-)

At least that's what I would do if my HDD wasn't unbreakable...

pete_1967
14th May 2009, 04:50 PM
isn't it better one working application than 25 useless ones
Please explain why are they all useless? Just because you can't be backsided to learn any of them?

SlowJet
14th May 2009, 10:34 PM
LV snapshots to another LV (without compression) took about 22 mintes, with compression much small output..
Pent III 800 on udma33 120GB HD.

SJ

# lvs
LV VG Attr LSize Origin Snap% Move Log Copy% Convert
LogVol14BKUPS VolGroup14 -wi-a- 32.00G
LogVol14home VolGroup14 -wi-ao 63.28G
LogVol14slash VolGroup14 -wi-ao 10.56G
LogVol14swap VolGroup14 -wi-ao 2.00G
[root@Jovette-14 /]# df -l
Filesystem 1K-blocks Used Available Use% Mounted on
/dev/mapper/VolGroup14-LogVol14slash
10901764 4135960 6212028 40% /
/dev/sda1 317335 33549 267402 12% /boot
/dev/mapper/VolGroup14-LogVol14home
65312548 2205048 59789740 4% /home
tmpfs 513928 28 513900 1% /dev/shm
[root@Jovette-14 /]# lvcreate --size 2GB --snapshot --name /dev/VolGroup14/snaproot /dev/VolGroup14/LogVol14slash
Logical volume "snaproot" created
[root@Jovette-14 /]# lvcreate --size 1.5GB --snapshot --name /dev/VolGroup14/snaphome /dev/VolGroup14/LogVol14home
Logical volume "snaphome" created
[root@Jovette-14 /]# mount /dev/mapper/VolGroup14-snaphome /mnt/snaphome[root@Jovette-14 /]# mount /dev/mapper/VolGroup14-LogVol14BKUPS /mnt/BKUPS
[root@Jovette-14 /]# cd /mnt/BKUPS
[root@Jovette-14 BKUPS]# ls
lost+found Storeage
[root@Jovette-14 BKUPS]# cd Storeage
[root@Jovette-14 Storeage]# ls
bkupboot140513.bz2 bkuphome140513.bz2 bkuproot140513.bz2
[root@Jovette-14 Storeage]# tar -c -f bkuphome140514.tar /mnt/snaphome -P --preserve-permissions --xattrs --totals -b32 --exclude=*.isovdi --exclude=*.vdi
Total bytes written: 2071953408 (2.0GiB, 15MiB/s)
[root@Jovette-14 Storeage]# mount /dev/mapper/VolGroup14-snaproot /mnt/snaproot
[root@Jovette-14 Storeage]# tar -c -f bkuproot140514.tar /mnt/snaproot -P --preserve-permissions --xattrs --totals -b32 --exclude=*.isovdi --exclude=*.vdi
tar: /mnt/snaproot/tmp/.ICE-unix/1808: socket ignored
tar: /mnt/snaproot/tmp/orbit-gdm/linc-6d3-0-3e7faff067e03: socket ignored
tar: /mnt/snaproot/tmp/keyring-sR7bOu/socket.ssh: socket ignored
--snip--
tar: /mnt/snaproot/var/run/portreserve/socket: socket ignored
Total bytes written: 3985113088 (3.8GiB, 4.8MiB/s)
# tar -c -f bkupboot140514.tar /boot -P --preserve-permissions --xattrs --totals -b32 --exclude=*.isovdi --exclude=*.vdi
Total bytes written: 23740416 (23MiB, 23MiB/s)
[root@Jovette-14 Storeage]# ls
bkupboot140513.bz2 bkupboot140514.tar bkuphome140513.bz2 bkuphome140514.tar bkuproot140513.bz2 bkuproot140514.tar
[root@Jovette-14 Storeage]# ls -l
total 9107096
-rw-r--r--. 1 root root 20074217 2009-05-13 19:59 bkupboot140513.bz2
-rw-r--r--. 1 root root 23740416 2009-05-14 13:25 bkupboot140514.tar
-rw-r--r--. 1 root root 1938039985 2009-05-13 19:45 bkuphome140513.bz2
-rw-r--r--. 1 root root 2071953408 2009-05-14 13:07 bkuphome140514.tar
-rw-r--r--. 1 root root 1286724248 2009-05-13 18:22 bkuproot140513.bz2
-rw-r--r--. 1 root root 3985113088 2009-05-14 13:22 bkuproot140514.tar
[root@Jovette-14 Storeage]# df -l
Filesystem 1K-blocks Used Available Use% Mounted on
/dev/mapper/VolGroup14-LogVol14slash
10901764 4135968 6212020 40% /
/dev/sda1 317335 33549 267402 12% /boot
/dev/mapper/VolGroup14-LogVol14home
65312548 2205048 59789740 4% /home
tmpfs 513928 28 513900 1% /dev/shm
/dev/mapper/VolGroup14-snaphome
65312548 2205048 59789740 4% /mnt/snaphome
/dev/mapper/VolGroup14-LogVol14BKUPS
33027952 9287252 23405156 29% /mnt/BKUPS
/dev/mapper/VolGroup14-snaproot
10901764 4135964 6212024 40% /mnt/snaproot
[root@Jovette-14 Storeage]# lvs
LV VG Attr LSize Origin Snap% Move Log Copy% Convert
LogVol14BKUPS VolGroup14 -wi-ao 32.00G
LogVol14home VolGroup14 owi-ao 63.28G
LogVol14slash VolGroup14 owi-ao 10.56G
LogVol14swap VolGroup14 -wi-ao 2.00G
snaphome VolGroup14 swi-ao 1.50G LogVol14home 0.17
snaproot VolGroup14 swi-ao 2.00G LogVol14slash 6.88
cd /
[root@Jovette-14 /]# umount /mnt/BKUPS /mnt/snaphome /mnt/snaproot
[root@Jovette-14 /]# lvremove /dev/mapper/VolGroup14-snaphome
Do you really want to remove active logical volume "snaphome"? [y/n]: y
Logical volume "snaphome" successfully removed
[root@Jovette-14 /]# lvremove /dev/mapper/VolGroup14-snaproot
Do you really want to remove active logical volume "snaproot"? [y/n]: y
Logical volume "snaproot" successfully removed

manubellini
15th May 2009, 09:47 AM
I usually back up critical configs and docs, and figure when sometimes breaks it's a sign to upgrade anyway :-)
Fully agree with you ;-) !!!

Please explain why are they all useless? Just because you can't be backsided to learn any of them?
Yes, sorry, I didn't explain myself. I wasn't meaning they're really useless, but that they're not good to make a backup, for the reasons above. With a program like sbackup (or kbackup), do you need to learn something to use it? These are applications to be developed! Have I to pay to have an OS with a working backup application? I would do it, because without such an utility we can't call it an OS, for me.
Fortunately, there's that sbackup. But it's payed no attention, otherwise those important features would have been developed. They are two stupid lines to write, why sbackup hasn't them? How can Linux replace closed source OSs when we can't understand that people like easy thing and you can't tell them to open the terminal? Sometimes I'd like to join the developers, but it's the mentality which has to be changed, because some people want Linux to cope with DOS not Windows!!!
So is Linux a quality product? How can it be without a working backup utility (I mean for the desktop world and fitting that name)...?
By the way (this time I change proverb), in Italy we say something like "When you receive a horse as a present, you haven't to look at his teeth"!!! But Linux wants to cope with closed source OSs...

manubellini
15th May 2009, 09:52 AM
To those who have some kind of divinity, let me give you a tip: don't take photos if you don't mind to lose them, you'll save up time!!!

pete_1967
15th May 2009, 10:01 AM
Where did you read, or it says, that Linux is competing with, or trying to replace, Windows?

And what comes to my original question; your answer is essentially that you just can't be bothered to learn instead expecting same point-and-click stuff being available on Linux as you had in Windows. Well, Linux isn't Windows.

Wayne
15th May 2009, 10:29 AM
Obviously, your Google is broken and so is your package manager.... Obviously, this is too difficult:

yum install backintime-gnome

Edit: Also, if you want help and advice then just ask for it. Trolling about your inadequacies (not Linux's) will just get you ignored.

Wayne

stefan1975
15th May 2009, 10:39 AM
legato networker (emc now) and symantec backupexec .... the rest with tar zxvf | dd

manubellini
15th May 2009, 02:23 PM
Where did you read, or it says, that Linux is competing with, or trying to replace, Windows?

Ask it to the people joining LUGs all around the world (and the one at just 10 km from me), those with stickers saying "Bad Vista". Moreover, I agree with them since if there wouldn't have been Linux, my computer would have been in the dump.
Does it not compete because it's better? Yes, all in all I think too!


And what comes to my original question; your answer is essentially that you just can't be bothered to learn instead expecting same point-and-click stuff being available on Linux as you had in Windows. Well, Linux isn't Windows.

I cooperate with Fedora (at Bugzilla) because I was thinking that Linux could be the best OS, better than Windows, better than Mac OS X, and FREE. This includes to be easy-to-use, OF COURSE. If you want to stay in the 2nd millennium and use the DOS-like shell, that's OK for me. Have I to buy Windows or a Macintosh to come to the 3rd millennium? In such case, I'll do it (I had planned it)!
I'm writing here because Linux lives of volunteer work of people LIKE ME and I would like my time to be used, not to be wasted. I'm writing here (you couldn't understand it) because people is interested to Linux but we all haven't time to waste, so if Linux isn't easy to use all the time spent from those volunteers (and I) will be wasted, or at least not used at best.
If you can use the shell, that's good for you. I can too, but I don't want to. If I was something like that one you've said, I couldn't last a month at Engineering.


Obviously, your Google is broken and so is your package manager.... Obviously, this is too difficult:

yum install backintime-gnome

It sounds good. I'm going to try it.
What a pity, in my computer work both package manager and Google. There is a reason beacuse I haven't found it, and it is that I believe that the package manager is probably the most important feature of Linux for the desktop world: you have all, immediately, freely. That's very smart! Unfortunately, I searched "Backup" and backintime hadn't been shown, am I a stupid? Moreover, even if I wouldn't had to, I tried googling for some software, I hadn't found nothing interesting.
I'm going to report that at Bugzilla.


Also, if you want help and advice then just ask for it. Trolling about your inadequacies (not Linux's) will just get you ignored.

Done it before, you could answer!!!

http://forums.fedoraforum.org/showthread.php?t=213693

I'm trolling that there's a lot of people like that one above that can use the command line, then everybody should use the command line!!! From my point of view, it's time to develop smart software, that everybody can use. This is the reason Linux is born, and this is the reason I still haven't bought this Mac of the hell.
That smart software could be that backintime. Anyway, too often I hear talking about the command line for example to install software, people will keep Windows because you can do it with a pair of clicks. If you don't care, other people like me and like everybody develops software thinking it could be useful to others, we do or we should do it.
Am I wrong?

manubellini
15th May 2009, 02:43 PM
Mmm, maybe I'm in the wrong place... Probably in the Ubuntu forums they can better understand these speaks!

JN4OldSchool
15th May 2009, 03:37 PM
Here ya go guys, I'm passing them out:

http://img24.imageshack.us/img24/7593/grxineoprenewadersl.jpg

Manubellini, your motives are good but you are very naive! You do not understand what open source is, but do not feel bad, you are not alone. Keep with it my friend, you will come to understand how things really work. Yes, Linux has many weak points and the thing is they really cannot ever be fixed due to the nature of what it is. You will need to learn how to use one of the many backup schemes you list. I would not worry about the next person, they will have to learn on their own also. I also would not worry too much about Linux ever overtaking Windows or even Apple. It will just never happen. Ever. Use Linux for your own reasons and quit worrying about everyone else. :)

edit: Oh, forgot to say, if you can create a better backup app then mo' power to ya! Go for it! THAT is what open source is all about.

sideways
15th May 2009, 09:58 PM
He has a point about finding backintime from the repositories, it isn't in the list I posted, here's why:

There are 3 backintime related packages:

$ yum search backintime
Loaded plugins: presto, refresh-packagekit
============================= Matched: backintime ==============================
backintime-common.noarch : Common files for backintime
backintime-gnome.noarch : Frontend for backintime
backintime-kde.noarch : Frontend for backintime

No indication that any of those is backup software, maybe the descriptions would shed some light for the casual searcher:

$ yum info backintime* | grep -e Name -e Description

Name : backintime-common
Description: This package contains non GUI files used by different GUI fontends.

Name : backintime-gnome
Description: Gnome frontend for backintime

Name : backintime-kde
Description: KDE frontend for backintime

As you can see, anyone searching for backup solutions with the Fedora package manager probably wouldn't find backintime, thanks to Wayne for the suggestion.

manubellini
15th May 2009, 11:30 PM
Manubellini, your motives are good but you are very naive! You do not understand what open source is, but do not feel bad, you are not alone. Keep with it my friend, you will come to understand how things really work. Yes, Linux has many weak points and the thing is they really cannot ever be fixed due to the nature of what it is. You will need to learn how to use one of the many backup schemes you list. I would not worry about the next person, they will have to learn on their own also. I also would not worry too much about Linux ever overtaking Windows or even Apple. It will just never happen. Ever. Use Linux for your own reasons and quit worrying about everyone else.


Thank you, we can understand each other! ;-)
But... I don't agree, at all. I think that if I do something in open source, someone else will take advantage of it.
I spend a lot of time in volunteering, I know I have as much benefits as people I take care of.
Probably it's time for me to switch to Ubuntu, because I am what I am because of who we all are.


edit: Oh, forgot to say, if you can create a better backup app then mo' power to ya! Go for it! THAT is what open source is all about.

I'd like to join the developers, but unfortunately there's too much to do, everywhere (I'm not talking about Linux only, of course. I spend my time at the Red Cross, at the Blood Donors and... at Bugzilla, it's enough for now).


As you can see, anyone searching for backup solutions with the Fedora package manager probably wouldn't find backintime, thanks to Wayne for the suggestion.

https://bugzilla.redhat.com/show_bug.cgi?id=501085

JN4OldSchool
15th May 2009, 11:37 PM
Thank you, we can understand each other! ;-)
But... I don't agree, at all. I think that if I do something in open source, someone else will take advantage of it.
I spend a lot of time in volunteering, I know I have as much benefits as people I take care of.
Probably it's time for me to switch to Ubuntu, because I am what I am because of who we all are.



I'd like to join the developers, but unfortunately there's too much to do, everywhere (I'm not talking about Linux only, of course. I spend my time at the Red Cross, at the Blood Donors and... at Bugzilla, it's enough for now).



https://bugzilla.redhat.com/show_bug.cgi?id=501085

Try Linux Mint. The release candidate for 7 is very very tight and is also quite usable as it sits. It really only needs a final polishing for release. I think you may like it and Mint even comes with a backup tool called.............drumroll.............MintBackup ! :D

http://www.linuxmint.com/blog/?p=796

It is also a very small community where everyone is easily heard. I have seen many forum suggestions implemented almost overnight. They are trying very hard to build the OS that people want.

stevea
16th May 2009, 12:29 AM
Perhaps not so odd, but most of the *backup* related comments here are inadequate in one major respect.

If you "duplicate" your data to the same disk, the disk is a single point of failure.
If you dup data to a second dis of a system, the system is a sinple point of failure.
If you dup data to a NAS in your residence or office, the place itself is a single point of failure (imagine for example that some disgruntled FF admin firebombs your place, not such an unlikely event I think).
For a fee EMC2 or others will vault your data in a mountain in Utah or the Alps, then we at least reduce the SPOF to a planetary disaster.
Perhaps we encode some info into the next interplanetary exploration project, but I have the impression that civilization has declined to the point where this technology is only historical and the ability to recover the data dubious.
I've considered methods of encoding data into the redundancy of html or other long-lived protocols.
----

Back closer to reality ... does anyone have an offsite/net data storage service that is A/ inexpensive and preferable free and B/ would allow me to encrypt all my data. There is ZERO chance I'd give unencrypted data to a cheap backup service.

adrianx
16th May 2009, 01:05 AM
OK, I'm stO0pid.....

My backup needs are simple. I just use rsync -avz --delete ......

I like the -v(erbosity), so sue me! :D The --delete thing is a bit problematic, sometimes, and seeing as I do it once every hour, there's not much leeway between 10:00 and 10:01, if I delete something by mistake. Some day, when my needs become more "sophisticated", I'll backup to a different location somewhere between 10:00 and 10:01. :) Oi weh, it's getting very complicated.

stevea
16th May 2009, 02:35 AM
OK, I'm stO0pid.....
......

The problem w/ your method is that if you corrupt a file or remove one by accident you have a fraction of one hour before your "backup" has the matching corruption or loss. You should really have an archival backup, not just a "semi-live" copy.

Often the loss of files or a directory isn't discovered immediately.

Firewing1
16th May 2009, 06:52 AM
I have a rather complicated setup :p

Since I triple boot my Mac machine, I use fwbackups on the Linux and Windows side but Time Machine on OS X. It all goes to the same drive though - it's been split into two partitions.

4)Fwbackup: I can't remember, I remember I didn't like it (maybe it was a GUI for rsync?);
It is, in a manner of speaking... It automates your backups using crontab, but the actual backends for the archive format wraps "tar" with the appropriate arguments (excludes, compression, etc) and same for direct copy and "rsync" respectively. I've been looking for a way to handle the backup natively instead of using subprocesses/wrapping, but the performance is just horrible in Python... Which is one of the reasons why I'm (slowly) rewriting it into C++ and Qt :)

rpstitz
16th May 2009, 08:07 AM
I never backup except for my music on my USB stick (8GB for under $20). My installation hardly ever lasts long enough to mess anything up before I delete the partitions and install a new Linux. I don't think I've gone more than three months with the same distro or version. Since I am opening a business, I will undoubtedly need to start learning about these things, as I am sure I'll have data on my drives that I have to save for the tax man. I'll be sure to keep paper copies in the file cabinet as well, and it's a block building with steel roof construction so there's very slim chance of fire. I do live in tornado alley and pretty close to the New Madrid fault line, so natural disaster isn't out of the question.
yum install backintime-gnome is now running in my terminal, thank you very much...:)

manubellini
16th May 2009, 10:51 AM
Try Linux Mint.
I think this time I'm going to make you happy!!!

imagine for example that some disgruntled FF admin firebombs your place, not such an unlikely event I think
Very likely, it is!!! :-) It's better to go to make someone getting tired elsewhere...

If you dup data to a NAS in your residence or office, the place itself is a single point of failure (imagine for example that some disgruntled FF admin firebombs your place, not such an unlikely event I think).
For a fee EMC2 or others will vault your data in a mountain in Utah or the Alps, then we at least reduce the SPOF to a planetary disaster.
I've considered these before, but I was thinking that if my home had exploded, I would have bigger problems than retrieve my data! Anyway, I'm going to learn more, but where is my privacy???


Quote:
yum install backintime-gnome
is now running in my terminal, thank you very much...
You see, I was not the only one...!

Wayne
16th May 2009, 04:25 PM
All it takes is a few brain cells. Lucky you....

Wayne

rpstitz
16th May 2009, 05:36 PM
Back in Time is very straight forward and easy to use. After reading this thread, I was almost afraid of installing it but I'm glad I did...I created a hidden folder (/home/.backup) to dump my docs and music to, set the timer to once per week, and then before exiting I checked the "Exclude" tab to make sure that .backup was there and it was. Smart program. I just now checked the folder and found that my stuff has been backed up, so I gzipped the folder and burned it to a DVD. The only way it could have been any easier is if I had a pet monkey to do it for me. :D

Manubellini, I understand where you're coming from about not being able to tell your customers to type this long line of mumbu jumbo into the terminal, but I didn't have to use the terminal one single time to get my files backed up to my specs, and until I read this thread I had never used any backup software before. It was that simple.
If, however, you don't find a particular software easy enough to use and you want a certain new feature to appear in the GUI, then contact the project in question and submit a suggestion or two. I've done that very thing with GRAMPS and they are wonderful, receptive people who love their project and want to help. I think you'll find that most are.

manubellini
16th May 2009, 07:20 PM
All it takes is a few brain cells. Lucky you....
I chose IT because I like efficiency; I mean doing as much as possible with as less click as possible (did I write well?):

efficiency = output / input (with the same input, the more the output, the more the efficiency!)

Obviously, the output must be of the expected kind.
Now, we can do many more things than 50 years ago thanks to it (not all good things, but here it doesn't depend on IT).

If, however, you don't find a particular software easy enough to use and you want a certain new feature to appear in the GUI, then contact the project in question and submit a suggestion or two. I've done that very thing with GRAMPS and they are wonderful, receptive people who love their project and want to help. I think you'll find that most are.
Yes, I did it for sbackup. I had a fast support when there was a bug (I had to save before launching the backup, it wasn't easy to understand at first time). Unfortunately, to implement new features is not as fast for them...