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View Full Version : OS X "Spaces" style of Virtual Desktops on Fedora?



gu1dry
23rd January 2009, 12:40 AM
I've installed F10, yet & I have a question before I decide my DE.

I'm looking for a virtual desktop app, that is similar OS X's "Spaces" & if there is one, which DE do I need. I'm currently deciding between XFCE & Fluxbox...

nightmarcus
23rd January 2009, 02:35 AM
Well I like Gnome, it's very functional and stable. It's not the most lightweight, but it's a nice balance for me. In KDE you have the option of having multiple workspaces, but the windows in each one share the taskbar, so your taskbar can get pretty full. In Gnome, each workspace has its own separate taskbar. It's not an application per say, it's just a feature of the desktop environments. The default number is 4. You can add more if you like. To switch between them you can either click the appropriate space on your desktop pager at the bottom, or just hold Ctrl+Alt and press the left and right arrow keys. If you have Compiz enabled, you can hold Ctrl+Alt and click and drag your desktops around by turning a cube so you can see two sides at once, and it just adds that cool factor to your computer.

gu1dry
23rd January 2009, 02:50 AM
I know all DE environments already have workspaces built into them. I dislike Compiz.

I'm talking more like OS X's style of workspaces, like I said in the OP.

example of what I'm talk about to the oblivious:
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/b/bd/Spaces.png

scottro
23rd January 2009, 02:54 AM
Fluxbox isn't a DE (Desktop Environment) per se, it's more of a window manager. (WM).

The definition can sometimes be blurry, but in general, a desktop environment will have all sorts of things of its own--for example, XFCE, Gnome, KDE and other desktop environments have their own printer configuration tools, network configuration tools, etc.
Fluxbox is very light, and really does little more allow you to move windows around. That's a bit of an exaggeration, you can also run menu items and such, but it's not like Gnome and company, or even XFCE, a relatively light desktop environment.

If your wish to try to emulate Mac's appearance, you'll probably have the best chance with Gnome, especially with using the avant-window-navigator, which does a nice job of duplicating the Mac dock.

The spaces feature, if I understand it (I'm not sure that I do) is simply having what seems to be a separate desktop available for the app you're working on. Most X windows programs have that ability.

scottro
23rd January 2009, 02:58 AM
Oh dear. The oblivious?

Feel free to edit your post and make it a bit more appreciative of people who try to help.
As for me, I'm afraid any wish to help has disappeared.

gu1dry
23rd January 2009, 03:13 AM
Fluxbox isn't a DE (Desktop Environment) per se, it's more of a window manager. (WM).

The definition can sometimes be blurry, but in general, a desktop environment will have all sorts of things of its own--for example, XFCE, Gnome, KDE and other desktop environments have their own printer configuration tools, network configuration tools, etc.
Fluxbox is very light, and really does little more allow you to move windows around. That's a bit of an exaggeration, you can also run menu items and such, but it's not like Gnome and company, or even XFCE, a relatively light desktop environment.

If your wish to try to emulate Mac's appearance, you'll probably have the best chance with Gnome, especially with using the avant-window-navigator, which does a nice job of duplicating the Mac dock.

Thanks but no thanks on Gnome. I hate the look, hate the bloat & much prefer the lightweightness of XFCE/Fluxbox/E17.



The spaces feature, if I understand it (I'm not sure that I do) is simply having what seems to be a separate desktop available for the app you're working on. Most X windows programs have that ability.

Basic what Spaces is a workspaces app on OS X, that also allows you view all the workspaces with a key on the keyboard or a button on the mouse.



Oh dear. The oblivious?

Feel free to edit your post and make it a bit more appreciative of people who try to help.
As for me, I'm afraid any wish to help has disappeared.

I was more referring to the first reply, where they totally disregard what I actually said went into a complete tangent.

nightmarcus
23rd January 2009, 04:02 AM
How did you see my reply as a tangent? I was offering information I thought was helpful. I have never used OS X except in passing(it's an overpriced guified Unix mod), so I had to google what these "Spaces" were in the first place, and I gave you an explanation of the closest thing I could think of. Even if my advice was incorrect, there's no need to insult me because we're not talking face to face.

Wayne
23rd January 2009, 04:04 AM
Keep it friendly please folks, otherwise I'll be forced to close the thread down :(

Wayne

nightmarcus
23rd January 2009, 04:06 AM
My apologies, I'm headed out for work anyway, so I won't bother you guys any more.

Wayne
23rd January 2009, 04:09 AM
The message was intended for anyone and everyone getting heated up in here. To the OP, you really need to adjust your attitude toward those trying to help you. Read the forum guidelines before posting again. I understand if English is not your first language but try and think before you write. Thanks.

Wayne

scottro
23rd January 2009, 04:12 AM
A cursory google indicates that there doesn't seem to be an equivalent. There are various window managers that tile, (including fluxbox) but that's not the same thing--the tiling is also, as near as I can see, relatively unsophisticated compared to spaces.

As Wayne said, let's all keep it polite. Wayne, you're in charge, because I'm going to sleep.

お休みいいい

marko
23rd January 2009, 04:40 AM
In KDE you have the option of having multiple workspaces, but the windows in each one share the taskbar, so your taskbar can get pretty full. In Gnome, each workspace has its own separate taskbar.

In KDE4 you can right click on the taskbar, Select "Task Manager Settings" and check in the popup menu:

"only show tasks from the current desktop"

and that should fix the crowding.

gu1dry
23rd January 2009, 04:42 AM
A cursory google indicates that there doesn't seem to be an equivalent. There are various window managers that tile, (including fluxbox) but that's not the same thing--the tiling is also, as near as I can see, relatively unsophisticated compared to spaces.

Thanks for the help. I would really love this an option in Linux, but I guess it's not & I'll live with it.

Now what you were saying earlier that FluxBox, is not actually a DE but only a WM. So that mean I still have to have XFCE/Gnome/KDE/etc installed on my PC for Linux to work?

scottro
23rd January 2009, 05:42 AM
No, no, not at all. (Although this, in Fedora, can be a qualified no.) :)

Fedora, Ubuntu, and some others, almost fight you if you don't use one of their pre-chosen desktop environments. They tie many things into either Gnome, KDE, or XFCE. For example, with Fedora, if I install X, but not Gnome, sound might not work without editing a file in /etc/security. NetworkManager will start, but there won't be any graphic interface for it, and your networking will be messed up.

These are all relatively trivial to fix once you know how--as we all know, almost anything is easy if you know how to do it.

I'm not sure what happens if you install Gnome, let it use the GDM (the gnome login screen) and then choose fluxbox--in that case, everything might work, but I honestly don't know, I don't do it that way. (I prefer to boot into text mode, and type startx.)

The operating system will certainly work. It's just that you will be missing some features that are provided by a Desktop Environment. Depending upon your preferences (you mentioned you dislike bloat) and experience, this might be fine. Fluxbox will provide a menu, but when you start it, you'll just see a blank screen and tool bar. You can bring up the menu by right clicking.

However, you'll have to configure your printer, for example, by yourself, if you want clickable icons, you'll have to use another program, such as rox, or even fboxpanel (I think that's its name) or the like. That avant-window-navigator (awn) that I mentioned before I realized you were more concerned with the spaces feature, could also work in fluxbox.

If you're not familiar with tiling, in fluxbox, if you hit a certain key combo, it will tile the windows--that is, give each window an amount of space--as I said, though it isn't as sophisticated, you can get some weird sizes and shapes--for example, if you just have two xterms and a browser open, they might be in three long skinny windows along your screen. I believe this behavior can be controlled, but I've never used tiling enough to really investigate.

Fluxbox is probably aimed more at people who are happier with command line than with graphic controls. It's very handy, for example, if you use a graphic environment primarily to have several xterms open.

If you get really interested in using Linux, whether Fedora or another, it will gradually all make a lot more sense. If you're relatively new, and more comfortable with point and click, XFCE might be the best choice, at least to start.

I prefer fluxbox, but I'm also used to setting up printers, sound, and so on with command line tools or third party programs. You can easily install both, start with xfce, and play with fluxbox when you're in the mood. :)

gu1dry
23rd January 2009, 07:26 AM
Thank you for all the info. I'll install the XFCE Spin of F10 & install Fluxbox once I'm comfortable with Linux, since is will be first time I'm actually sitting down & getting the full blown Linux experience. I've dabbled will it in the past but never really played/tried it.

Oh I'm sorry if I came across strong earlier...

Wayne
23rd January 2009, 09:25 AM
No problem, just try to remember we're all Fedora users helping other users and sometimes you will get an answer that you don't want to hear :)

Wayne