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racegmr
18th November 2008, 12:23 AM
HOLY SMOKES!

I've spent the better part of the past 2 weeks trying to get my wireless nic working on my desktop with Fedora 9. Every time I do something listed in the forums (IE. ndiswrapper-1.53, networkmanager-0.7.0, ndiswrapper GUI, and today using Add/Remove Programs) I get error messages that some file or another is missing or can't be located :confused:

I'm frustrated beyond hope, so I've signed up here and am writing a post as my last resort to becoming a Linux user. I HATE Windows, although XP home and pro have been fairly stable. The glitches are getting on my last nerve :mad:

So, a few months ago, I purchased Fedora 9 DVD i386 and installed it. I have had nothing but headaches ever since. What I've come to realize is that, for some unknown reason, my install is corrupt, that is, has missing files, will not automatically mount sda1 and sdb1. When I do mouth them manually, they unmount when I boot back in. Every time I run into an issue, I have to reboot to Win XP, go online and search for answers, save any files to a local directory since $$ are very tight right now and my CD R/RW drive is acting screwy, so I cannot afford to waist money on blank media.

Anyhow, after printing out info and saving any needed software (ndiswrapper, dhcp, etc.) I reboot into Fedora, have to manually mount sda1, copy files over, just to get more error messages. And, forget about changing permissions. Neither chmod nor unmask work. Chmod worked fine yesterday, but not today???

Anyhow, thanks for allowing me to vent, and if anyone has any suggestions, please feel free to let me know. I am very new to Linux and learning programming in terminal is difficult as I have been tech support and user of Windows since 1995 and have to relearn commands. :eek: Also, if anyone know how I can get a DVD/CD copy of Fedora 10 for free, I am up for helping out in some way. I am unemployed, waiting for decision on SSD and have lots of time on my hands.

Marty

Demz
18th November 2008, 12:31 AM
please put a more descriptive title next time

your probably better off installing Ubuntu since your a newb ..Fedora is a moving Distro, with all the updates can often Break things,

racegmr
18th November 2008, 12:49 AM
please put a more descriptive title next time

your probably better off installing Ubuntu since your a newb ..Fedora is a moving Distro, with all the updates can often Break things,

Thanks for the advise about "More Descriptive Title". I can see how that would be more beneficial. As for Ubuntu, been there, tried that. Didn't care for it. The look/feel just wasn't right for me. I may be a newbie with Linux/Fedora, but like I stated, "I've been working with computers since 1995, tech support 2 years, dos commands, etc. I've been learning the commands in Fedora fairly quickly, with some confusion, but fairly quickly. My problem is Fedora 9. It is, what I believe to be a bad DVD or something that caused some files to not be loaded and entries in fstab to be missing, etc.

If you don't have any better suggestions than to use Ubuntu, please don't waste my time or yours replying to my post(s). Again, I appreciate your input, but if I wanted something beside Fedora, I would have downloaded/purchased it.

Demz
18th November 2008, 01:04 AM
Thanks for the advise about "More Descriptive Title". I can see how that would be more beneficial. As for Ubuntu, been there, tried that. Didn't care for it. The look/feel just wasn't right for me. I may be a newbie with Linux/Fedora, but like I stated, "I've been working with computers since 1995, tech support 2 years, dos commands, etc. I've been learning the commands in Fedora fairly quickly, with some confusion, but fairly quickly. My problem is Fedora 9. It is, what I believe to be a bad DVD or something that caused some files to not be loaded and entries in fstab to be missing, etc.

If you don't have any better suggestions than to use Ubuntu, please don't waste my time or yours replying to my post(s). Again, I appreciate your input, but if I wanted something beside Fedora, I would have downloaded/purchased it.

there's always the Search an Google Facility , ..did you atleast do a md5checksum on the Disc ? did you check the Media matched?

racegmr
18th November 2008, 01:18 AM
No, I didn't even know the command (md5checksum). And, while your mentioning it, I suppose it may have been helpfull to check the media before doing the reinstall.

Thank you for that! I will have to reboot to Fedora and do both. And, believe me, I've Googled my issues over and over and over again :eek: Lots of info, some good, some bad. Lots of printed out pages and a few downloaded files.

racegmr
18th November 2008, 04:54 PM
No, I didn't even know the command (md5checksum). And, while your mentioning it, I suppose it may have been helpfull to check the media before doing the reinstall.

Thank you for that! I will have to reboot to Fedora and do both. And, believe me, I've Googled my issues over and over and over again :eek: Lots of info, some good, some bad. Lots of printed out pages and a few downloaded files.


OK. I ran cksum /dev/dvdrw after reading this post and this is the result:
2840394079 3580676096

I am assuming that, since there are two different numbers, I have a bad DVD :(

I haven't had time to boot to the Fedora DVD, but I am going to do that later and check the media just to see what that comes up with.
Hopefuly, upgrading to Fedora 10 will fix bugs/errors.

stoat
18th November 2008, 05:15 PM
OK. I ran cksum /dev/dvdrw after reading this post and this is the result:
2840394079 3580676096

I am assuming that, since there are two different numbers, I have a bad DVDHello racegmr,

A couple of comments...

1. That is not what that means. Besides, it's the SHA-1 hash that you should be checking. Fedora ISO files used to create the installation DVDs and CDs are accompanied by SHA-1 hashes that are in the text file SHA1SUM. Normally, the utility sha1sum in Linux or sha1sum.exe in Windows is used on a downloaded ISO file to generate an SHA-1 hash for comparison to the known good hash in SHA1SUM.

2. You usually cannot run sha1sum (or md5sum, for that matter) directly on the disk in the optical drive and then compare that result to the hash for the ISO file. The burning software adds so-called padding that will produce a different result checking the disk. Since you purchased your disk (I think), you would have to check the disk itself by using a script to remove the padding from the result from the disk. It produces a result that can then be compared to the ISO file's hash. You can see more about how to do that and where to get the script in the HOWTO on verifying (http://forums.fedoraforum.org/showthread.php?t=166240). However, I doubt that your disk is bad since you bought it. Still, it won't hurt to check it if you have sufficient motivation to do so.

3. Here are the hashes in the text file SHA1SUM that accompanies the ISO files of the i386 arch version of Fedora 9...
-----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE-----
Hash: SHA1

50253a35b5ba128c9a57b2a10cbd829813fc5119 Fedora-9-i386-DVD.iso
af25833a3babe1bd943dae16a1c17cf7a9e0b767 Fedora-9-i386-disc1.iso
d4ffbe83cd75bf0153e821af98b7e56f5b4f6c32 Fedora-9-i386-disc2.iso
579702ea19a5e4114186a665735823dd4b5269b6 Fedora-9-i386-disc3.iso
368e98bf95708d040f83be975c0ede372f32d44b Fedora-9-i386-disc4.iso
67426850ce065a048d0a04eecb003b383b6f5830 Fedora-9-i386-disc5.iso
c01ccd2d3811ab1f04cacba63e51690b34629f95 Fedora-9-i386-disc6.iso
3b1df20ece05d64c34dd9c64400975b74eded0f2 Fedora-9-i386-netinst.iso
-----BEGIN PGP SIGNATURE-----
Version: GnuPG v1.4.9 (GNU/Linux)

iEYEARECAAYFAkgiX4AACgkQtEJp0E8qb9LLZACfZD/jeqvSfQRQM9EAzGku9mrK
EFwAnRdS28Q9onwS6rExI4vBrS0Ytpt/
=OG7t
-----END PGP SIGNATURE-----


P.S.: Regarding your wireless problem, after you get Fedora 9 installed and working normally, you should identify the chipset of your wireless card. It's at least possible that there is a built-in Linux driver for it. If that proves to be otherwise, then push on with ndiswrapper. But you should try the binary kmod-ndiswrapper packages. They are in the RPM-fusion-free repository these days. Install the RPM-fusion repos (if not already installed), and then yum install ndiswrapper. It should install without trouble. But that's usually just the beginning of these wireless journeys. Next you must acquire the correct Windows XP driver for the card and get it installed with ndiswrapper. And finally, you must get connected with it. It's all thoroughly documented in many threads. You may even find one involving your card's chipset.

racegmr
18th November 2008, 11:21 PM
Thank you stoat!

That, so far is the best information I have received. I will run that script next time I boot in Fedora.

As for wireless nic, it is a Linksys WMP54GS which was purchased about 2/3 weeks ago. There is no Linux driver. I have downloaded the most recent Win XP driver (not Vista driver) and have them copied to /root/wireless_driver/linksys directory that I created per other post instructions. The linksys is driver is bcmwl5.sys & bcmwl5a.sys. I also downloaded ndiswrapper-1.53.tar.gz and dhcpcd-1.3.22-pl4.tar.gz and ran as instructed in a post by Daemon+.

Fedora does see my nic but I am unable to configure it, or get it working. I can go into network/wireless and input my SSID, set WEP to 128 bit hex and input the key. I also check the box to connect automatically. When I close out of that, it shows "Wireless 1" and in the next column it say "never". Don't know what that column is?

Anyhow, that's as quick a breakdown as I can give you. Any command results you many want to better assist me can be ran and saved.

Thank again!
Marty

stoat
19th November 2008, 12:47 AM
If your wireless card works in XP with either of those drivers, then there is a Linux driver that may very well work with the card. It is known as b43. It has been around since Fedora 7, and its predecessor, bcm43xx (still around but no longer used by Fedora), for a good while prior to that. Now, you can do what you want, of course. I have WMP54G and WPC54G cards that can work with either method (ndiswrapper or b43). I periodically switch back and forth, but for the longest time now I prefer b43.

To identify the card's chipset and settle that issue with certainty, do this in a terminal...
/sbin/lspci | grep NetworkYou should take a moment to do that and post the result for the record.


In the meantime, here are some "factoids" related to your situation so far that came to my mind...
If you forge ahead with ndiswrapper compiled from source, know that you will have to recompile it again after every new Fedora kernel (often, if you update regularly). It's not a big deal, really. But you should know that. I once used compiled ndiswrapper myself. After a while I got to where I could do that little chore in a minute or so. This why I suggested the RPM-fusion (Livna until recently) kmod-ndiswrapper group of packages earlier. But to be fair, those have a potential weakness related to kernel updates, too (the main reason I like b43, I guess).


That dhcpcd package that you also compiled from source, probably was not necessary. The DHCP client known as dhclient is a default package in the Base package group in Fedora. You have it now unless you specifically unchecked it during installation (doubtful). I once used dhcpcd, too. But dhclient sort of replaced dhcpcd in Fedora. And it works fine.


The above two "factoids" make me suspect that you have been reading old material as a reference.


NetworkManager is a so-called mandatory package in the Base package group. You have it. Most people can get connected with it almost as easily as in Windows XP. I did (after a while). I no longer have to use the Network Configuration utility to establish wireless connections.


So you may be "backing your way" into this and doing it the hard way unnecessarily. I can't promise a thing, however. These wireless threads have a tendency to be somewhat unpredictable from case to case. Anyway, start with finding out what chipset the card is using for now. It's always the first step.

racegmr
19th November 2008, 06:12 PM
If your wireless card works in XP with either of those drivers, then there is a Linux driver that may very well work with the card. It is known as b43. It has been around since Fedora 7, and its predecessor, bcm43xx (still around but no longer used by Fedora), for a good while prior to that. Now, you can do what you want, of course. I have WMP54G and WPC54G cards that can work with either method (ndiswrapper or b43). I periodically switch back and forth, but for the longest time now I prefer b43.

To identify the card's chipset and settle that issue with certainty, do this in a terminal...
/sbin/lspci | grep NetworkYou should take a moment to do that and post the result for the record.


In the meantime, here are some "factoids" related to your situation so far that came to my mind...
If you forge ahead with ndiswrapper compiled from source, know that you will have to recompile it again after every new Fedora kernel (often, if you update regularly). It's not a big deal, really. But you should know that. I once used compiled ndiswrapper myself. After a while I got to where I could do that little chore in a minute or so. This why I suggested the RPM-fusion (Livna until recently) kmod-ndiswrapper group of packages earlier. But to be fair, those have a potential weakness related to kernel updates, too (the main reason I like b43, I guess).


That dhcpcd package that you also compiled from source, probably was not necessary. The DHCP client known as dhclient is a default package in the Base package group in Fedora. You have it now unless you specifically unchecked it during installation (doubtful). I once used dhcpcd, too. But dhclient sort of replaced dhcpcd in Fedora. And it works fine.


The above two "factoids" make me suspect that you have been reading old material as a reference.


NetworkManager is a so-called mandatory package in the Base package group. You have it. Most people can get connected with it almost as easily as in Windows XP. I did (after a while). I no longer have to use the Network Configuration utility to establish wireless connections.


So you may be "backing your way" into this and doing it the hard way unnecessarily. I can't promise a thing, however. These wireless threads have a tendency to be somewhat unpredictable from case to case. Anyway, start with finding out what chipset the card is using for now. It's always the first step.

Results of /sbin/lspci | grep network:
02:0c.0 Network controller: Broadcom Corporation BCM4318 [AirForce One 54g] 802.11g Wireless LAN Controller (rev 02)

I also ran iwconfig and the results are:
lo no wireless extensions.
eth0 no wireless extensions.
wmaster0 no wireless extensions.
wlan0 IEEE 802.11 ESSID:""
Mode:Managed
Frequency:2.412 GHz
Access Point: Not-Associated
Tx-Power=0 dBm
Retry min limit:7
RTS thr:off
Fragment thr=2352 B

How do I install b43 and where do I find Network Manager?

stoat
19th November 2008, 11:10 PM
Results of /sbin/lspci | grep network:
02:0c.0 Network controller: Broadcom Corporation BCM4318 [AirForce One 54g] 802.11g Wireless LAN Controller (rev 02)That chipset is supported by b43 according to Linux Wireless (http://linuxwireless.org/en/users/Drivers/b43) which is sort of the "home" now for the b43 driver. Most everything else that I mention about the b43 driver comes from that site. You can refer to it at will, too.



The packages situation...




How do I install b43...?You don't install b43. It's a kernel module that is included with current Fedora kernels. You should confirm that the b43 module is being loaded with this...
/sbin/lsmod | sort


...where do I find Network Manager?NetworkManager should be installed now as I said. It is a mandatory package in the Base package group in Fedora. It will appear in the Gnome system tray when the NetworkManager service is enabled and started later on.

You will need the package b43-fwcutter. It is a default package in the Hardware Support package group, so you probably have it installed. You can check with this...
rpm -q b43-fwcutter

Next, if I were you, I'd make uninstall that dhcpcd thing (if it will do it) because you will be using dhclient (the default DHCP client in Fedora and already installed). I would also make uninstall ndiswrapper, too. Because even if you go back to ndiswrapper after this adventure, I urge you to yum install the RPM-fusion version. I mean, why compile when perfectly good and maintained binary packages can be installed nearly effortlessly with yum? Do what you want, of course. Maybe you love to compile source code. At least undo anything that might load the module (e.g., aliases, scripts, etc.).



The b43 steps...

The centrally important step in using b43 is to acquire the firmware that the wireless chip requires. This step involves downloading a Broadcom driver (you can't use bcmwl5.sys) and using b43-fwcutter to "extract" the firmware from the driver. Once that step is done, and once the appropriate services are enabled and running, then hopefully NetworkManager will establish a connection with your access point.

1. Get the Broadcom driver, untar it, change directories to it...
NOTE: It would be nice if you can do this step on the actual computer by using a wired connection to the Internet. If you can't do that, then do this step wherever you have Internet and somehow get the driver file (wl_apsta_mimo.o) on the computer's hard drive.
wget http://mirror2.openwrt.org/sources/broadcom-wl-4.150.10.5.tar.bz2
tar xjf broadcom-wl-4.150.10.5.tar.bz2
cd broadcom-wl-4.150.10.5/driver

2. Extract the firmware...
su
b43-fwcutter -w /lib/firmware wl_apsta_mimo.o



The NetworkManager steps...

1. Enable and/or restart NetworkManager in Services (system-config-services).

2. Try establishing a connection using the NetworkManager tray icon now. You might get lucky. If you cannot connect, there are a few tweaks that may help.



P.S.: I just followed these exact steps myself for a new F9 installation on an A31 Thinkpad. The Linksys WPC54G wireless card connected to a Linksys WRT54G router with NetworkManager using WPA encryption and without any problems. I copied and pasted the steps that I used directly from this page into the terminal while temporarily using a wired NIC connection to the Internet for the download step. Maybe it will go that way for you, too.

racegmr
21st November 2008, 03:23 AM
OK, this is getting rediculous. Every single time I try to run a downloaded package, I get error messages, ever single time. What the HELL is going on? I got to the point tonight, after trying to follow your directions to a "T", where I said, "screw it" and did a fresh install. After that, I went into terminal, logged in as root (su -- then password) went to /home/Marty/Download where I have the b43-fwcutter, run it using: tar xjf b43-fwcutter... going into the directory and using the "make" command. As with every other file I have downloaded (in xp and copied to fedora after mounting drive) I get error messages that files/paths, etc. not found or some other crap like that. I just get error after error after error, even after a fresh install. I follow all instruction exactly, and still no luck. Should I not be logged in as root? What else could be wrong? Also, the DVD says 386, but while booting up, says 686. Is that because I installed web server or what? I am so screwed up :eek:.

Sorry to rant like this, but so far nothing has gone right. I did /sbin/lsmod | sort and it showed b43, I ran rpm -q b43-fwcutter and showed it as b43-fwcutter...(version)-f19.386i but I can't find it in directories where I can run it. Is Network Manager on the top bar to the left of the time/date? The one that when open allows me to go in, click on wireless tab and enter SSID, wep info, etc? If so, I can config the setting to the same as my router, but it will not connect.

What am I doing wrong? Am I just blind? HELP ME PLEASE :mad:

stoat
21st November 2008, 04:08 AM
Every single time I try to run a downloaded package, I get error messages, ever single time.I'm trying to understand why you even want to do that. The only thing you should have downloaded was the Broadcom driver tarball. And you don't "run" it. You untar it and run b43-fwcutter on it.




...went to /home/Marty/Download where I have the b43-fwcutter, run it using: tar xjf b43-fwcutter... going into the directory and using the "make" command.tar xjf b43-fwcutter? make? You will not find what you just wrote in any of my posts in this thread. I never said anything about compiling b43-fwcutter. In fact, I said just the opposite: That it is a default package in the Hardware Support package group, so you probably have it installed already. I have been trying to get you to stop compiling source code for packages available via yum. I think you just wasted your time downloading a tarball source package of b43-fwcutter when it was very likely sitting there already installed.




I ran rpm -q b43-fwcutter and showed it as b43-fwcutter...(version)-f19.386i but I can't find it in directories where I can run it.You don't need to go looking around for it in directories. More of your time wasted. I posted the exact terminal command that you should use to invoke it and make it extract the firmware from the Broadcom driver (step #2 in the b43 steps).

Time out...

Just based on what you said in your last post, it looks like you only think you are following the steps correctly. You are not. You also sound frustrated and angry. I recommend that you stop for today, log out, and go away until another day. Last night, I followed my own steps above and they worked. I actually copied them directly from this page while connected to the Internet by wire, and pasted them directly into a terminal. Afterwards, I disconnected the wire to the NIC and connected wirelessly with NM. No problems. Now, you may not have it that easy, but you don't even have a chance if you are not being careful with the steps.

racegmr
21st November 2008, 04:35 AM
I'm trying to understand why you even want to do that. The only thing you should have downloaded was the Broadcom driver tarball. And you don't "run" it. You untar it and run b43-fwcutter on it.

tar xjf b43-fwcutter? make? You will not find what you just wrote in any of my posts in this thread. I never said anything about compiling b43-fwcutter. In fact, I said just the opposite: That it is a default package in the Hardware Support package group, so you probably have it installed already. I have been trying to get you to stop compiling source code for packages available via yum. I think you just wasted your time downloading a tarball source package of b43-fwcutter when it was very likely sitting there already installed.

You don't need to go looking around for it in directories. More of your time wasted. I posted the exact terminal command that you should use to invoke it and make it extract the firmware from the Broadcom driver (step #2 in the b43 steps).

Time out...

Just based on what you said in your last post, it looks like you only think you are following the steps correctly. You are not. You also sound frustrated and angry. I recommend that you stop for today, log out, and go away until another day. Last night, I followed my own steps above and they worked. I actually copied them directly from this page while connected to the Internet by wire, and pasted them directly into a terminal. Afterwards, I disconnected the wire to the NIC and connected wirelessly with NM. No problems. Now, you may not have it that easy, but you don't even have a chance if you are not being careful with the steps.

OK, forget everything I just vented about. I rebooted to Fedora, did a few different things and found /usr/bin/b43-fwcutter , ran it with the command you gave me, and here I am :D. Online right now, typing in Firefox from Fedora 9.

How can I repay you stoat? I am sooo grateful for all of your help and patients getting me connected. It took me 2 weeks (14 days) of continual effort, confusion, etc... and now not only am I online, but I have learned much about Fedora and terminal commands. :cool:

Unfortunately, I am unable to connect wired as I used to since moving our office to the bedroom in order to close of the back bedrooms (1 being the office) for winter. I had to leave the satellite modem there because that is where the 2 sets of coax come in. I had to go out and purchase the wireless nic just for this purpose.

Again, thank you very, very much for all of your help!

Marty