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superbnerd
10th August 2004, 12:14 AM
As we all know, linux is praised for its stability and uptime once it is properly configured. Also, most zealots say you never should need to reboot unless you are upgrading the kernel. How is this at all economical unless you have a great power saving scheme setup (which no one really talks about in linux)? The suspend support is experimental, so unless you are at you computer 24/7 (which is common for some of us :D) or running a server, how do you justify the seemingly wasted electricity?
Perhaps we need a good tutorial about power saving setup.

Jman
10th August 2004, 06:53 PM
It's nice. I once 86 days uptime on a Red Hat 7.3 box.

The common joke is that you don't need a heater when it's cold out because of all the whirring machines. :)

You can donate CPU cycles to numerous distributed computing projects, like Folding@Home (http://fedoraforum.org/forum/showthread.php?t=18393)

I admit that easy standby and hibernate would be useful for notebooks on battery.

Although I bet the real reason nobody shuts them off is that they don't want to reset their uptime. :)

Moved to Linux Chat.

imdeemvp
10th August 2004, 06:59 PM
It's nice. I once 86 days uptime on a Red Hat 7.3 box.

Moved to Linux Chat.

at work we have terminal running on w2k pro...this is how we place our two daily orders via net....some people at worked are surprised why it has not crashed yet but since i use it on a daily basis i tell them that there has been times i need it to shut down or reboot it...

but if you asked i think i ran for about 5-6 months without rebooting and shuting it donw...this machine is only use 5-7 times daily or less

btw there are times i tempted to leave my machine running but i just think it will be a wasto of electricity...so far i know is very stable :D

crackers
11th August 2004, 03:28 AM
Also, most zealots say you never should need to reboot unless you are upgrading the kernel.
You're mis-reading or mis-representing here - that statement does not ever imply that you can't just shut it down for the night. The statement actually means that if you make a change to your system's configuration, aside from installing the kernel, you do not have to reboot your system for the configuration to take effect - which is almost exactly opposite of Windows - at least until XP came along.

If I change my network settings, say from static to DHCP, all I need to do is restart the networking services. On pre-XP windows, this required a reboot.

Ug
11th August 2004, 08:32 AM
Mind you XP still has a lot of things which it needs to be rebooted for such as installation of basic software such as MS Office, for it to be integrated properly or upgrading your display drivers.

superbnerd
11th August 2004, 08:58 AM
You're mis-reading or mis-representing here - that statement does not ever imply that you can't just shut it down for the night. The statement actually means that if you make a change to your system's configuration, aside from installing the kernel, you do not have to reboot your system for the configuration to take effect - which is almost exactly opposite of Windows - at least until XP came along.

If I change my network settings, say from static to DHCP, all I need to do is restart the networking services. On pre-XP windows, this required a reboot.

I know that. i'm no fool (no offense foolish) as my name implies:D But as i said, alot of zealots (foamming at the slashdotters) say that. I incountered this when trying to tweak fc1 to boot faster (its boot is teribly slow, a little less than a minute without serious reconfiguring). The zealots said there is not a need to (re)boot fast becasue you never need to shutdown.
But you miss the point of my post: what is a good power saving policy or howto?

kosmosik
11th August 2004, 09:52 AM
Also, most zealots say you never should need to reboot unless you are upgrading the kernel.
kernel is modular so in fact if you upgrade a kernel (rather update due to flaw or something), usualy you can just reload the flawed module instead of rebooting... but in common setup it makes no sense since it consumes a lot of resources (human) - it is better to reboot automagicaly after new kernel package install and forget about it. :) but sometime you just can't reboot and then kernel modularity is very handy...


Perhaps we need a good tutorial about power saving setup.
just turn the damn thing off when you are not working ;]]

on my workstation (notebook IBM TP600e) I use hibernation, good thing about it that it works, and is handled mostly by bios, you must have one (first) FAT partition where memory is dumped, and that is it. after resume sometimes pcmcia freezes. simple script reloading modules does it...

kosmosik
11th August 2004, 10:00 AM
If I change my network settings, say from static to DHCP, all I need to do is restart the networking services. On pre-XP windows, this required a reboot.
it does not.


at work we have terminal running on w2k pro... (...) but if you asked i think i ran for about 5-6 months without rebooting and shuting it donw...this machine is only use 5-7 times daily or less
well that means that you haven't applyed some serious patches (which need reboot). please firewall this box off. I don't care about you :P nor your network :PPP I care that your PC my be infecting others on WAN too (since it is not patched or firewalled)...

earobinson111
11th August 2004, 04:38 PM
[earobinson@localhost earobinson]$ uptime
11:32:00 up 1 day, 59 min, 7 users, load average: 1.16, 1.41, 1.62

hey a stats on my advrage uptime would be cool

why 7 users?

crackers
12th August 2004, 04:16 AM
it does not
Windows 95 and 98 required reboots if you changed network settings. Note that I excluded XP - I was amazed when someone showed me that it was possible.

Gimme a break! I haven't used Windows in over 5 years!!! :D

kf6kmx
12th August 2004, 05:55 AM
Well, one of mine that handles 2 email domains, and 3 web domains, currently under Core1 is at
21:53:36 up 87 days, 3:20

And it was a reboot for hard drive installlation the last time.

Mat
12th August 2004, 06:26 AM
at work we've turned on that automatic windows update service.. almost every two days we got this message "new updates available, please reboot"... :)

at home, I turn my computer off, whenever I leave him for more than ten minutes.. makes no sense for me to bill higher bills, just cause I can't wait five minutes till it booted again..

Mat