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aldend123
28th October 2008, 12:16 AM
I'm a little unclear on how YUM works. If I install something outside of yum, will yum recognize it automatically?

If I have some source code to a component already installed by YUM (eg Firefox) and I compile it and install it myself outside of Yum, will yum recognize the changes?

PabloTwo
28th October 2008, 12:34 AM
Short answer. No. Yum is an rpm based package manager. Yum only deals with rpm packages. If you install source code using the usual method:

./configure
make
su -
make install

Yum won't know anything about it.

P.S. Yum actually calls on rpm to do the actual installing or removing of rpm packages. If you install an rpm package using the rpm command directly, you could uninstall it using either yum or rpm, as yum will referrence the database list of currently installed packages and the metadata associated with those packages that rpm keeps track of, though yum wouldn't have a record of the installation of that package in it's own log file.

JohnVV
28th October 2008, 05:02 AM
i do this all the time .Building the source code and not installing a rpm .
for example i build Gimp, Celestia, Nip2/vips, ImageMagick, Stellarium , ClamAV, ...
just keep up to date with the new releases .

aldend123
28th October 2008, 07:08 AM
What if the rpm is already installed, and I install over it with a different build? Will this cause trouble?

brebs
28th October 2008, 10:33 AM
"Trouble"? It depends.

The thing is, what you should really, really be doing, is learning how to create RPMs (http://docs.fedoraproject.org/drafts/rpm-guide-en/) and then just using RPMs. Running ./configure is easy, yes. It's just as easy to have that command in a .spec file.

USE the package manager, rather than fight it. This applies to EVERY distro that has a package manager.

bee
28th October 2008, 12:19 PM
Short answer. No. Yum is an rpm based package manager. Yum only deals with rpm packages. If you install source code using the usual method:

./configure
make
su -
make install

Yum won't know anything about it.

P.S. Yum actually calls on rpm to do the actual installing or removing of rpm packages. If you install an rpm package using the rpm command directly, you could uninstall it using either yum or rpm, as yum will referrence the database list of currently installed packages and the metadata associated with those packages that rpm keeps track of, though yum wouldn't have a record of the installation of that package in it's own log file.
Wrong :p :D
you have to type "su", without "-"...because it will move you to /root as current dir... then you'll have to "cd" into the right path. So, it's good type "su" (without "-") and then "make install".

bye! :) :p

virtuozzo
28th October 2008, 01:32 PM
What if the rpm is already installed, and I install over it with a different build? Will this cause trouble?

Typically, software built from source is being installed into /usr/local/* folder space instead of /usr/*. AFAIK, /usr/local/bin has a priority over /usr/bin so in case you've installed package Xxx from RPM and then built it from source as well, then those "source" binaries will be called when you type xxx in you console (assuming xxx is a binary prog from Xxx package). That's no a problem unless your "source" binaries start to search for particular version of libraries and shared objects so you would probably have to built half of you system from source :D. Well, that's actually the work packagers do instead of you ;)

PabloTwo
28th October 2008, 01:59 PM
Wrong
you have to type "su", without "-"...because it will move you to /root as current dir... then you'll have to "cd" into the right path. So, it's good type "su" (without "-") and then "make install".
Good catch, and you are right. I've often noticed others being guilty of the same mistake when posting instructions/exapmples, and have put myself among the guilty with that slip up.

bee
28th October 2008, 02:41 PM
Good catch, and you are right. I've often noticed others being guilty of the same mistake when posting instructions/exapmples, and have put myself among the guilty with that slip up.
gotcha! :p :p :D ;)

yes, it's not only a your fault! ;) it's common!! :) :)

bye!! :)

JohnVV
28th October 2008, 08:02 PM
su , su -, i just cd back to the build folder in /opt/src