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miller521
29th July 2008, 01:42 AM
I have a few questions if someone can answer them. I have used Linux for many years off and on. However I've not touched Fedora in quite some time and that is because I prefer KDE over Gnome, I don't want to start a flame war, and its not that I think Gnome is bad, I just think KDE can be configured better, and I like KDEvelop, so might as well use the Desktop manager that actually displays the QT buttons etc correctly.

Anyways, I am setting a Linux box and I want to do a couple things with it, can someone tell me if this is easy to set up on Fedora.

Basically I want to set up a Linux box that I can ssh into and ftp into remotely.

Also I want to be able to use something similar to Windows Remote Desktop when I want to view the actual Desktop, meaning I want to view the desktop from my Windows machine.

Lastly, I like to 'play around' so to speak with Gnome and KDE and XFCE, when I last used Fedora KDE felt like a afterthought to the distribution. Is it more polished now? Or is Gnome still the distro that gets the best treatment by the dev team?

Basically I'm trying to decide between Fedora, openSUSE, Debian and something more bleeding edge like Arch linux. But I definitely need to be able to do some kind of remote desktop into it.

Thanks

pparks1
29th July 2008, 02:02 AM
Fedora runs ssh by default and installing an ftp server is trivial (yum install vsftpd)

For the remote desktop, you want to use VNC. This thread here explains what needs to be done, it's pretty straightforward. http://www.fedoraforum.org/forum/showthread.php?t=194101&highlight=VNC

You can easily switch back and forth between the different desktops. I think it all depends upon what you like. Personally, I like Gnome...but I prefer the slightly less graphically appealing version of the desktop. I don't like things too flashy. that said, I don't think there is anything wrong with KDE...just not my cup of tea.

miller521
29th July 2008, 02:16 AM
Fedora runs ssh by default and installing an ftp server is trivial (yum install vsftpd)

For the remote desktop, you want to use VNC. This thread here explains what needs to be done, it's pretty straightforward. http://www.fedoraforum.org/forum/showthread.php?t=194101&highlight=VNC

You can easily switch back and forth between the different desktops. I think it all depends upon what you like. Personally, I like Gnome...but I prefer the slightly less graphically appealing version of the desktop. I don't like things too flashy. that said, I don't think there is anything wrong with KDE...just not my cup of tea.


So using the VNC program I will be able to open the desktop just like I can remote into another windows machine? Bascially it looks just like I'm using that machine, is that how this will work as well?

miller521
29th July 2008, 09:00 PM
So does anyone know if its possible to do remote desktop with Fedora where I actually use the desktop just like i were using an actual monitor on the machine?

For instance, lets say I'm using the machine's monitor and I'm doing some work, i want to be able to remote in and see what I have opened etc.

Also, if I have a samba share mapped into Windows and I edit the files in Windows, do the permisions get saved correctly or does samba keep the permissions?

drokmed
29th July 2008, 09:48 PM
Basically I'm trying to decide between Fedora, openSUSE, Debian and something more bleeding edge like Arch linux. But I definitely need to be able to do some kind of remote desktop into it.
All of those are good distro's for what you want. opensshd-server is easy to install and setup. vsftpd server is easy to install and setup. VNC server is easy too. Just install them, and read the docs in /usr/share/doc. Samba shares can be tricky, especially permissions, requiring you to read up on it.

Fedora is excellent for what you want. There are tons of howto's here that cover everything you want, just search these forums. The Fedora forums are excellent... active with knowledgeable users. pparks1 already answered your VNC question, you need to read up on VNC and see for yourself.

openSUSE is good for what you want. The YaST GUI configuration tool will probably simplify every task you mentioned via it's graphical interface. Downsides for opensuse: it's the SLOWEST linux distro (noticeably) and it's forums are pretty dead. Best suse support probably found at linuxquestions.org

Debian is an excellent distro. You should go with Lenny, it's very mature and solid, and about to shift into the "stable" release. Debian forums are excellent... not very active, but very knowledgeable people there.

I haven't touched Arch Linux yet.

Good luck, and let us know what you decide to do.

Daryl

blitzo
29th July 2008, 09:56 PM
So does anyone know if its possible to do remote desktop with Fedora where I actually use the desktop just like i were using an actual monitor on the machine?

For instance, lets say I'm using the machine's monitor and I'm doing some work, i want to be able to remote in and see what I have opened etc.

Also, if I have a samba share mapped into Windows and I edit the files in Windows, do the permisions get saved correctly or does samba keep the permissions?


Yes, VNC will take care of the remote issue. You can remote into it and pretend you are directly in front of the machine.

As for Samba I am not exactly sure what you mean. By default I believe if you open the file as a user and edit and save it, it will over write the group ownership of that file. However you can change that to always keep the permissions. It all depends on how you are configuring Samba and what you want it to do.

I will recommend Fedora, I also use several desktop environments, I have always been a KDE fan but Gnome has been growing on me the more I use it. Give Fedora a try and go from there.

miller521
29th July 2008, 10:56 PM
Thanks for all the input guys. I've been reading through the forums and it seems there are lots of problems with VNC working correctly. Though most of those issues seem to be with Gnome, and honestly, I do not like Gnome much at all.

The only comment that I didn't understand was the one that said openSUSE is the slowest. Do you mean in performance or rlease or what? Becuase I've tested the 11.0, and it seemed pretty fast to me.

drokmed
30th July 2008, 01:10 AM
The only comment that I didn't understand was the one that said openSUSE is the slowest. Do you mean in performance or rlease or what? Becuase I've tested the 11.0, and it seemed pretty fast to me.
openSUSE has a history of being bloated, eating too much ram, taking too long to boot, and yes, performance-wise, is noticeably slower than other distro's. I used SUSE for many years, up to 10.3, and it continued to have that problem. I haven't tried 11.0, so they may have addressed that issue. If they did, it would have to be a significant improvement, and my apologies.

miller521
30th July 2008, 01:21 AM
openSUSE has a history of being bloated, eating too much ram, taking too long to boot, and yes, performance-wise, is noticeably slower than other distro's. I used SUSE for many years, up to 10.3, and it continued to have that problem. I haven't tried 11.0, so they may have addressed that issue. If they did, it would have to be a significant improvement, and my apologies.

Oh there is no need to apologize to me. I don't mind what anything thinks of a particular distro. I think my biggest issue is that I like stuff from all of them. I like debians package management the best, I like how polished KDE is in openSUSE, I enjoy the rolling release system of Arch Linux and I like the speed of Gentoo.

Its really just a hard choice.

blitzo
30th July 2008, 01:30 AM
Oh there is no need to apologize to me. I don't mind what anything thinks of a particular distro. I think my biggest issue is that I like stuff from all of them. I like debians package management the best, I like how polished KDE is in openSUSE, I enjoy the rolling release system of Arch Linux and I like the speed of Gentoo.

Its really just a hard choice.


Thats one of the reasons I use Linux and FOSS. I have a lot of choice, I have freedom in my choice.