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View Full Version : GRUB hosed after kernel update Fedora 9



abirdman
26th July 2008, 12:47 PM
This morning I found several updates-- including the kernel, to 2.6.25.11-97.fc9.x86_64 (from 2.6.25.10-86) and happily allowed the installer to update everything. When the process finished, I restarted and the system stopped when it attempted to load grub. :confused:

I was able to recover, using instructions I found at Fedorabook.com (http://dailypkg.fedorabook.com/index.php?/archives/158-System-Recovery-Week-Rescue-Mode-and-Reinstalling-Grub.html), but it required intervention with a rescue CD (of course, I had to download and burn the ISO, because I couldn't locate the one I already have), and some scary command line work. The file system which is supposed to be available at /mnt/sysimage was not there (the rescue boot warned me of errors), but I'm guessing it's because my drives use LVM. I happen to have several computers I can use to effect this kind of thing but I'm not sure every Fedora 9 user is so lucky.

The happy outcome is that fixing grub was a very simple four-step process and it worked perfectly and almost instantly, and my computer now boots correctly. I have to assume that perhaps there's a problem in the system update code that doesn't update grub completely. It might be worth a second look by the update crew.

n0ize
26th July 2008, 04:33 PM
same here, the new kernel does not boot correctly but i just told him to boot with the old kernel. can u explain me how i must edit grub to boot the new kernel correctly?

ps: the update before also had problems. it wanted to install old versions instead of new ones, my system refused to install them of course. are these local problems or is it "just" corrupted updates?! sry im a beginner and a little bit confused, everything works so great with fedora core 9, besides the updates.

//edit

my problem was that i used nvidia drivers compiled for the old kernel, so i just uninstalled them, booted the new kernel and finally reinstalled them for the new kernel. now it works. :)

abirdman
26th July 2008, 06:41 PM
same here, the new kernel does not boot correctly but i just told him to boot with the old kernel. can u explain me how i must edit grub to boot the new kernel correctly?

I never got to the grub menu where I had the choice to boot into the earlier kernel. The BIOS screen just got to the point of attempting to load with the word GRUB at the bottom of the screen and that was it.

The link in my original post (I just tested it, and it works) goes directly to an article that explains clearly how to boot from the rescue CD and then startup and update grub.

The nvidia problem has been around for some time, related to the fact the driver is tied to the kernel version. Nvidia won't release the source code, so every kernel version needs a pre-compiled video driver to work, and that process must be managed by the distribution-- plaudits to the Fedora and Livna staff for keeping it sorted out. I have learned to make sure to wait for the nvidia driver before updating the kernel. So far that has been working fine.

cheers

n0ize
27th July 2008, 02:44 AM
u dont have to wait, its pretty simple to get the driver updated for the new kernel. at first u will need the originial nvidia driver from nvidia.com. u will find a guide here, how to install it for the first time: linux-gamers.net. after u've installed it u will need only two cmds to fix it. when u boot a new kernel it will show u the cmd line, there u enter:


nvidia-installer --uninstall
nvidia-installer --update
maybe u'll need to start ur network manually for the install process.


service network start

then reboot and thats it. ;)

JN4OldSchool
27th July 2008, 02:53 AM
n0ize, why are you using the nVidia drivers from their website? You will have to recompile each time you switch the kernel. Why not just use akmod-nvidia from livna? It is all automatic.

stoat
27th July 2008, 03:46 AM
The link in my original post (I just tested it, and it works) goes directly to an article that explains clearly how to boot from the rescue CD and then startup and update grub. Hello abirdman,

Yeah, I read the article in your link. It's great and everything, but I thought I would mention that the subject of re-installing GRUB would surely make it into the top ten subjects discussed here. It's brought up by somebody just about every day. For example, searching Google with this phrase to restrict the engine to only this site yields thousands of threads and posts...

reinstall grub site:fedoraforum.org

Other search terms related to reinstalling GRUB yield thousands more at only this site...

grub-install site:fedoraforum.org
grub root setup site:fedoraforum.org

I'm glad your situation had a happy ending as you said. I guess I just didn't want you to leave thinking the readers here have never heard of this issue before.

abirdman
27th July 2008, 11:28 AM
I guess I just didn't want you to leave thinking the readers here have never heard of this issue before.

The reason I posted was to alert someone at Fedora that the most recent kernel update hosed grub on my main computer. I have no way to know whether this happened to everyone, or it was just a localized glitch. When it's 5:30 am on the last day before my vacation, I am not inclined to do a statistical analysis of the best possible sources of answers. First, I needed my computer to boot, and second, I thought I should tell someone. When N0ize asked me how I did it, I referred him to the article I got the information from. Maybe it's not good netiquette to refer someone to another website from here, and if so, I apologize for that. But I'll tell you, when I originally posted, I was solely interested in letting people know the update I had just downloaded (through official Fedora channels) and installed, functionally killed my machine. I'm not spamming for the other site-- I don't even know who they are.All I know is they had the answer I needed.

And you've got to admit, it's kind of ironic how there are so many online resources to address things like repairing non-booting computers, or network cards that don't work.-- the very things that will keep one from accessing them in the first place.