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DarkDarkness
6th April 2008, 05:55 AM
Everytime I restart my fedora 8, and login as root, i get "This session is running as a privileged user", and I need to confim this.
How can I cancel it?
Thanks

Seve
6th April 2008, 06:00 AM
Hello:
This warning message/popup is new with F8 and as far as I am aware, you cannot disable it unless you wish to delve into a modification of the source code
.......

Seve

Hlingler
6th April 2008, 06:04 AM
Everytime I restart my fedora 8, and login as root, i get "This session is running as a privileged user", and I need to confim this.
How can I cancel it?
ThanksYou can avoid the message by not logging in as root user, which is strongly discouraged for security reasons. Log in as your normal user, and use root-user privileges only when required for administrative tasks.

V

w5set
6th April 2008, 06:05 AM
Switch to Visa for 2 weeks...that minor little nag "running as root/priveledged user" will seem trivial then. :)

P4rD0nM3
6th April 2008, 11:50 AM
Yeah, just login as a normal user and then just use sudo or su -. Hope that helps!

DarkDarkness
6th April 2008, 11:58 AM
I'm the only user of this computer, and I prefer ro log in as root (for comfort reasons).
Is there any way?

glennzo
6th April 2008, 12:49 PM
If you like to play as root you run the risk of destroying your operating system. One mistyped command and you're done. Log in as your regular user and learn to use the OS the proper way.

Dan
6th April 2008, 02:21 PM
Just another man's opinion, DarkDarkness, but it's not just yourself you are placing at risk.

A good part of the reason there are so many damn zombie spam-bot Windows machines out there is this silly penchant folks have for running in an admin level account for everyday operations. You not only risk your own install, you run the risk of getting rootkitted and becoming a pain in the back pockets to everyone else on the web. You also run the risk of becoming a breeding ground for viruses and the like.

That being said, besides getting into the source code and altering it there, I don't know of any other way to ease this point of "discomfort."


Dan

Aaron_H
6th April 2008, 05:38 PM
Just to echo everybody else.. one of the main reasons Linux is considered more secure than windows is the fact that the normal way to use the operating system is to login as a regular user and only use root for admin purposes. There really isn't much need to login as root for day to day use.
If you want to install programs etc, you can just use su and your root password. I don't see any reason why logging in as root would be more "comfortable".

DarkDarkness
6th April 2008, 10:01 PM
Umm, one of the reasons is that when I login as root, I can access the second hard drive installed on my computer (where the XP installed), but when I login as normal user, I can't see it...

Hlingler
6th April 2008, 10:13 PM
Umm, one of the reasons is that when I login as root, I can access the second hard drive installed on my computer (where the XP installed), but when I login as normal user, I can't see it...Then you need to edit (or create) the correct mount commands/options in fstab. Example (works for me):
/dev/sda1 /mnt/c_drive ntfs-3g rw,defaults,umask=022 0 0
Your partition arrangement will of course be different. Mount location (/mnt/c_drive in example) should be readable by either your normal user, or world-readable.

V

DarkDarkness
6th April 2008, 10:25 PM
Thanks.
Another question: When I login, I need to enter "keyring" password to connect the network. Can I make the connection automatic as I login, instead of entering the password everytime?

Hlingler
6th April 2008, 10:43 PM
Thanks.
Another question: When I login, I need to enter "keyring" password to connect the network. Can I make the connection automatic as I login, instead of entering the password everytime?Personally, I run KDE DE so I don't know - that 'keyring' is a GNOME thing. I do not see any such thing occur when starting KDE desktop. Nor do I recall seeing it when playing around with GNOME, but maybe I wasn't paying attention.... Recommend you search the forum to see if that question has been answered before, or start a new thread to ask that question so that people who know will see and (hopefully) answer.

V

icydog
6th April 2008, 10:53 PM
A note about Hlingler's code from fstab: I think that line will give the owner (root) full access and everyone else read access. You can also make yourself the owner by adding ",uid=500" (where 500 is your uid; the command "id -u" will tell you who you are) after umask=022.

bob
6th April 2008, 10:53 PM
http://forums.fedoraforum.org/forum/showthread.php?t=172827

Seve
6th April 2008, 10:55 PM
Thanks.
Another question: When I login, I need to enter "keyring" password to connect the network. Can I make the connection automatic as I login, instead of entering the password everytime?
Hello:
If you have a look at this guide by one of our Forum Members [Dangermouse]it should help you out.
Keyring no password ask (http://dnmouse.webs.com/keyring.html)

Seve

DarkDarkness
6th April 2008, 11:35 PM
Thanks.
Another problem: Can't play MIDI Files. What to do?

(Needed to play in TuxGuitar)

DarkDarkness
7th April 2008, 12:27 PM
Can someone help?

Hlingler
7th April 2008, 12:33 PM
Is package timidity installed?
rpm -qa|grep -i timidity

That's the one for MIDI playback AFAIK.

V


[Vince@presario Mon Apr 07 07:35:08 ~]$ rpm -qi timidity++
Name : timidity++ Relocations: (not relocatable)
Version : 2.13.2 Vendor: Fedora Project
Release : 4.fc7 Build Date: Sun 14 Oct 2007 04:06:26 PM EDT
Install Date: Fri 04 Jan 2008 08:47:51 PM EST Build Host: hammer2.fedora.redhat.com
Group : Applications/Multimedia Source RPM: timidity++-2.13.2-4.fc7.src.rpm
Size : 1054668 License: GPLv2
Signature : DSA/SHA1, Tue 16 Oct 2007 05:53:45 PM EDT, Key ID b44269d04f2a6fd2
Packager : Fedora Project
URL : http://timidity.sourceforge.net
Summary : A software wavetable MIDI synthesizer
Description :
TiMidity++ is a MIDI format to wave table format converter and
player. Install timidity++ if you'd like to play MIDI files and your
sound card does not natively support wave table format.
[Vince@presario Mon Apr 07 07:35:11 ~]$

scotty38
23rd April 2008, 04:26 PM
To be fair I think yours has been the most rude post. As far as I can tell the others were only offering what is generally regarded as best practice advice.

Hlingler
23rd April 2008, 05:42 PM
Content removed as the poster was banned and behaved in a manner that did not dignify retaining the post.- BobWe (or at least I) did not answer the question directly for several reasons, one being that the direct answer would amount to telling someone how to shoot themselves in the foot. That would not be rude, it would be negligent and irresponsible.

But since you so rudely insist on having that answer, I'll answer the question (even though I nor the others have any obligation to do so): you must hex-edit the executable file that contains the warning, or modify the source code and re-compile it. If you need more details than that, post back or go find them yourself.

V

Aaron_H
23rd April 2008, 08:10 PM
I'm sorry that you found my reply (among others) rude, wkbean.

I only offered advice based on what I knew (since others had already explained that you would need to edit the source code) because I am a new user and it sounded to me as if the original poster was also a new user. We were all just offering our opinions (after the question had been answered) as to why running as root was not a good idea and possible ways to make his user experience more comfortable as a regular user.
It was then up to the original poster if he wished to follow our advice or continue running as root, but I doubt anybody would want to argue with him if he did wish to continue using the root account, afterall it is his choice.

If he didn't wish to follow our advice then he is free to edit the source code to remove the message. - I agree, the message annoys me, but I don't login as root very often anyway, as I do most root jobs from the command prompt.

JohnVV
23rd April 2008, 08:32 PM
hi wkbean if you REALLY want to get rid of the warning you will need to rebuild some of the operating system from the source code reinstall it , then MAKE SURE THAT NO SYSTEM UPDATE REPLACES IT . One way is to BUILD ALL SOFTWARE AN UPDATES FROM THERE RESPECTIVE SOURCE AND DEPENDENCIES. Do not use yum or rpm's but only install code from the source

Hay wait a min. this is sounding like Gentoo
http://www.gentoo.org/

sidebrnz
23rd April 2008, 08:47 PM
Best is umask=0000 if you want to be sure the XP partition is read/write for the world. If you do that, you don't need to specify rw.