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Paiev
29th January 2008, 05:33 AM
I dual-booted my laptop with Vista and Fedora 8 about a month ago. Today, when I turned it on, instead of the customary GRUB screen, I am redirected to a GRUB terminal (where I have no idea what to do). In addition, when I try to boot from CD, something along the lines of the following happens:


Uncompressing Linux...okay, booting the kernel
Buffer I/O error on device sr0, logical block 178487
Buffer I/O error on device sr0, logical block 178487
Buffer I/O error on device sr0, logical block 178487
Buffer I/O error on device sr0, logical block 178487
Buffer I/O error on device sr0, logical block 178487
Buffer I/O error on device sr0, logical block 178487
Buffer I/O error on device sr0, logical block 356799
Buffer I/O error on device sr0, logical block 356800
Red Hat nash version 6.0.19 starting
Setting up new root fs
no fstab.sys, mounting internal defaults
unmounting old /dev
unmounting old /proc
unmounting old /sys
Buffer I/O error on device sr0, logical block 356799
SQUASHFS error: sb_bread failed reading block 0xac724
SQUASHFS error: Unable to read cache block [2b1c7eb1:0]
SQUASHFS error: Unable to read block list [2b1c69f3:1f28]
Buffer I/O error on device sr0, logical block 356799
Buffer I/O error on device sr0, logical block 356799
Mount failed for selinuxfs on /selinux: No such file or directory
Unable to load SELinux Police. Machine is in enforcing mode. Halting now.
Kernel panic - not syncing: Attempted to kill init!

At this point, nothing more happens, except the lights on my laptop are now blinking, apparently due to the kernel panic.

Anyone have an explanation and any advice on how to resolve this? Also, how would I boot from the GRUB prompt (assuming the same thing that happened with the LiveCD wouldn't happen)?

Thanks.

Moray
29th January 2008, 12:41 PM
>Buffer I/O error on device sr0, logical block 178487
>Buffer I/O error on device sr0, logical block 178487

If you're lucky, the CD just needs cleaning, or it's a bad CD; if you're unlucky, it's the drive. Taken with the sudden failure of the normal boot process, that isn't a good sign. It would be worth getting the hardware checked.

At the GRUB terminal you should be able to type the same things that you put in the grub.conf file. If Vista is in the first partition of the first hard disk, these commands should try to boot it:

rootnoverify (hd0,0)
chainloader +1
boot

Another useful command from here would be

find /boot/grub/grub.conf
or
find /boot/grub/menu.lst

which will try to find your missing grub menu.

leigh123linux
29th January 2008, 12:46 PM
Moved to Laptop

Paiev
29th January 2008, 10:52 PM
>Buffer I/O error on device sr0, logical block 178487
>Buffer I/O error on device sr0, logical block 178487

If you're lucky, the CD just needs cleaning, or it's a bad CD; if you're unlucky, it's the drive. Taken with the sudden failure of the normal boot process, that isn't a good sign. It would be worth getting the hardware checked.

At the GRUB terminal you should be able to type the same things that you put in the grub.conf file. If Vista is in the first partition of the first hard disk, these commands should try to boot it:

rootnoverify (hd0,0)
chainloader +1
boot

Another useful command from here would be

find /boot/grub/grub.conf
or
find /boot/grub/menu.lst

which will try to find your missing grub menu.

I tried another LiveCD and it was able to boot without a kernel panic and with far fewer errors, although that same error still happened a few times. And yes, using those commands I was able to boot Vista, thanks.

Now the recovery tool from Sony (I never got around to removing the bloatware that came with Vista as I hardly even use it) is running. Ho hum. It ran a hardware diagnostics tool which detected no error with the HDD or with the CPU. Now I'm running windows system restore in an attempt to get windows to actually load (I'm just presented with a recovery screen).

The find command did not find either boot file.

Edit: I just realized that I was loading the recovery partition. Whoops. Bit of a needless system restore there. hd0,1 is Vista. The other two partitions are hd0,2 and hd0,4; hd0,2 appears to be ext2fs, so I'd think that it was Fedora, but after rootnoverify (hd0,2) or rootnoverify (hd0,4) I get an error 13.

How can I reconfigure GRUB to return it to its previous configuration (sorry if this is a stupid question)? And also, how can I boot Linux from Grub without getting an error 13?

Moray
30th January 2008, 01:39 PM
The commands for booting Linux are slightly different from the Windows ones: you need to know the name and location of the kernel file and its associated initrd file. If necessary we could try to find those using grub's "cat" command and tab-completion of filenames, but if we have LiveCD working there might be an easier way. The command

fdisk -l

should list all your disks and partitions. One of them - hopefully /dev/hda3 - should be a Linux partition with its boot flag set. I'm not quite sure how LiveCD does things, but normally you would be able to type

mkdir /mnt/hd
mount /dev/hda3 /mnt/hd
ls /mnt/hd

and see what is on that partition. Do that for each Linux partition you find. The default Fedora 8 kernel for i585-series processors and standard memory is vmlinuz-2.6.23.1-42.fc8, and I would expect it either in a boot directory or in the root of that filesystem. Also see if you can find a grub.conf or menu.lst file anywhere. If everything is where it is supposed to be, and all of Fedora is in the one partition, these commands in the grub terminal should boot Fedora:

root (hd0,2)
kernel /boot/vmlinuz-2.6.23.1-42.fc8 ro root=/dev/hda3
initrd /boot/initrd-2.6.23.1-42.fc8.img
boot

If (hd0,2) is a separate partition just for the boot files, remove "/boot" from the above and change the "root=" parameter to the partition of Fedora's root directory. I wish the word "root" wasn't being used for two different things here. Of course, if everything was where it was supposed to be, your system would probably still boot. I think something has happened to at least one of your boot files - or the whole partition - and we need to find out what.

Paiev
30th January 2008, 04:04 PM
hda1 and hda2 are the recovery and vista partitions, respectively; hda3 is a boot partition, and hda4 is an extended partition, which fedora in hda5. However, I cannot mount hda5. I can mount the other three fine, but not Fedora. I've been wondering if the partition is corrupted or something along those lines, and whether I can just reinstall fedora over it. Although, if I have a hardware problem (I think it might just be those two disks, actually; Knoppix seemed fine), I don't know how that would work out.

I don't remember the specific error message Knoppix gave me but I believe it was something along the lines of it being unable to determine the file system. The person I borrowed Knoppix from is currently elsewhere so I can't repeat it and get the specific error message again.

johnnymack
31st January 2008, 10:24 AM
Hey Paiev,

You said, "I dual-booted my laptop with Vista and Fedora 8 about a month ago." Did you install Fedora first and then install Vista? AND, if so did you ever successfully boot back into Fedora AFTER installing Vista?

Reason I ask, is that Vista may have clobbered the Linux partition. FWIW, Always install any M$ OSes FIRST and Linux LAST when making a dual-boot setup. It's just safer that way. If you did NOT install this way, you may have to reinstall Fedora again.

Buy your buddy lunch in return for getting him to make you a copy of Knoppix. This makes a good rescue CD which becomes indispensible when things go South like just now.

jm

Moray
31st January 2008, 10:48 AM
Here's a trick I just discovered: from Knoppix or LiveCD, try

file -s /dev/hda5

That should try to identify what is on that partition. If it is an ext2 or ext3 filesystem, and you feel like a challenge, you could try the filesystem checker (man page at http://linux.die.net/man/8/e2fsck):

e2fsck /dev/hda5

The output can be very cryptic though; reinstalling Fedora is probably the easier option. Make sure you have a good backup of anything important on your Vista partition (onto DVD or USB drive) in case this was caused by a failing hard disk.

Paiev
1st February 2008, 11:16 PM
johnnymack: Nope, I installed Vista first and then Fedora. I imagine that I would've been here rather sooner had I not :)

Moray: Thanks, I'll try that. I think I may just reinstall Linux, though I'm a bit annoyed at losing some code and other documents. Teaches me to make backups more often :)

EDIT: Also, I discovered that the issue with the CDs were the CDs themselves; I tried running one of them on anothe computer and got the same errors.

ryptyde
2nd February 2008, 01:36 AM
If you need to recover some documents or other data you can try "explore2fs" from Windows. I have used it with Windows XP and accessed files on Fedora 6 and F7. I haven't tried explore2fs with Vista yet but have googled around and saw that others have been successful.