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cooltd825
25th January 2008, 04:49 AM
Okay, for the record I've only been using Linux for a week and I'm already having a lot of issues. I started out with Ubuntu 7.10. A great OS, right? Well, there's a driver compatibility issue with my Nvidia card and it seems unavoidable at this point. So i installed PCLinuxOS. The drivers installed great, but it just seemed incomplete. There were problems with the window manager also.

Anyway, so I decided to try out F8. After downloading 3.7GB, I installed it this morning and put the drivers on. Ran perfectly, compiz and everything. I was even able to play Enemy Territory: Quake Wars, and to my surprise, it ran better than it does on the Vista partition on my HDD, and my wireless internet connected just fine.

But then comes the trouble... It said there were some package updates to be made, so I let it do its thing. I noticed that it was updating the kernel, but i just let it go. After everything installed, it asked me if I wanted to reboot. I did, but while it was booting up it failed to connect my wireless network. Then the X system starting going crazy and I had to reconfigure it. Right now I can boot into Fedora 8, but the wireless adaptor can't obtain an IP address and my Nvidia driver won't enable, no matter how much I try, redownloading the driver and things like that. Not only that, but all my windows are missing the "minimize, maximize, and exit" buttons. This is frustrating!!! I was able to get this OS running just fine, but then it went and updated itself and now it's less stable than a gymnast on a balance beam during the San Francisco earthquake.

Thank you for listening, hope you can solve my problem!

PavementPounder
25th January 2008, 05:05 AM
How did you install the Nvidia Drivers? Did you use the kmod-nvidia and xmod-x11-driver-nvidia off of yum?

cooltd825
25th January 2008, 05:06 AM
directly through the Nvidia website.

lazlow
25th January 2008, 05:14 AM
If you do it that way you have to recompile every time you update the kernel.

Demz
25th January 2008, 05:17 AM
always best to use kmod-nvidia drivers from livna

PavementPounder
25th January 2008, 05:19 AM
The ones on the nvidia web site can overwrite some critical libraries, I learned this the hard way after 4 reinstalls. Remove the nvidia drivers and then do an update using yum. Although you may still need to reinstall the Fedora unless somebody knows which files were overwritten. Check out the Fedora FAQ, It'll tell you how to get your video card working with yum without overwriting files. The ones on the repository are reconfigured specifically for Fedora. Make sure you do the yum configuration right away though.

cooltd825
25th January 2008, 05:19 AM
okay, i'll fix that. thanks, i didn't know that.

any solutions for the wireless issues? it recognizes it fine, but an IP address is never assigned and I can't open the network manager anymore.

dubb
25th January 2008, 05:20 AM
by any chance your not talking about this update are you?


[root@localhost ~]# yum check-update
Loading "protectbase" plugin
15 packages excluded due to repository protections

kmod-nvidia.i686 169.07-2.lvn8 livna
[root@localhost ~]# yum update
Loading "protectbase" plugin
15 packages excluded due to repository protections
Setting up Update Process
Resolving Dependencies
--> Running transaction check
---> Package kmod-nvidia.i686 0:169.07-2.lvn8 set to be updated
--> Processing Dependency: kmod-nvidia-2.6.23.14-107.fc8 = 169.07-2.lvn8 for package: kmod-nvidia
--> Running transaction check
---> Package kmod-nvidia-2.6.23.14-107.fc8.i686 0:169.07-2.lvn8 set to be updated
--> Processing Dependency: kernel-i686 = 2.6.23.14-107.fc8 for package: kmod-nvidia-2.6.23.14-107.fc8
--> Finished Dependency Resolution
Error: Missing Dependency: kernel-i686 = 2.6.23.14-107.fc8 is needed by package kmod-nvidia-2.6.23.14-107.fc8

cooltd825
25th January 2008, 05:26 AM
by any chance your not talking about this update are you?

no sir, the update was for the kernel itself. i'm using the 169.09 drivers anyway....

dubb
25th January 2008, 05:36 AM
i dont mean to hijack this thread but i always update yum how do i update this?

PavementPounder
25th January 2008, 05:40 AM
Do you mean how to update yum?

dubb
25th January 2008, 05:43 AM
i mean, how do i fix this?

[root@localhost ~]# yum check-update
Loading "protectbase" plugin
15 packages excluded due to repository protections

kmod-nvidia.i686 169.07-2.lvn8 livna
[root@localhost ~]# yum update
Loading "protectbase" plugin
15 packages excluded due to repository protections
Setting up Update Process
Resolving Dependencies
--> Running transaction check
---> Package kmod-nvidia.i686 0:169.07-2.lvn8 set to be updated
--> Processing Dependency: kmod-nvidia-2.6.23.14-107.fc8 = 169.07-2.lvn8 for package: kmod-nvidia
--> Running transaction check
---> Package kmod-nvidia-2.6.23.14-107.fc8.i686 0:169.07-2.lvn8 set to be updated
--> Processing Dependency: kernel-i686 = 2.6.23.14-107.fc8 for package: kmod-nvidia-2.6.23.14-107.fc8
--> Finished Dependency Resolution
Error: Missing Dependency: kernel-i686 = 2.6.23.14-107.fc8 is needed by package kmod-nvidia-2.6.23.14-107.fc8

what do i do next?

PavementPounder
25th January 2008, 05:50 AM
It's Because all the repository mirrors have not synched yet. Wait a little while or till tomorrow morning and try again and it should work.

marko
25th January 2008, 06:02 AM
The previous kernel is still installed, you can select the older one that was
working instead of the new one. Once you're booted, you can edit the /boot/grub/grub.conf
file to set the default to the the previous kernel so youi don't have to select it from
the menu. Butt this will only help if it really is the new kernel that was the problem,
maybe you updated something else at the same time, you can tell what yum
updated by checking the /var/log/yum.log file.


Mark

szandor
25th January 2008, 06:45 AM
what the hell. i just updated my kernel earlier today to 2.6.23.9-85.

Demz
25th January 2008, 09:45 AM
i dont think the nvidia driver 169.09 has hit the repo yet so im waiting till i download the new kernel

dubb
25th January 2008, 08:14 PM
heres a kernel update.
http://linux.slashdot.org/article.pl?sid=08/01/25/0529203

mbokil
25th January 2008, 08:45 PM
A general rule I follow with Fedora is to run yum update and exclude kernel updates. I will wait until the kernel modules for Nvida are ready and I have had a chance to see if there are problems with the kernel update. Then I update the kernel and Nvidia. It saves you from much frustration.

BKJ1
25th January 2008, 10:17 PM
Amen to that mbokil. I have screwed myself once again as the kernal was updated but not the nvidia piece upon reboot the nvidia.ko was not found due to kernal update.

Ok,. kmod is in the repos and I am back in business.

Note to self 'yum update --exclude kernel-*' or for a more permanent solution edit '/etc/yum.conf' and exclude 'kernel-*'

cooltd825
25th January 2008, 10:38 PM
haha, i'm not alone. it seems like Synaptic is better with these types of things, installing everything the OS needs at the same time instead of bits and pieces as they become available.

and my PC won't shut down properly. it keeps getting hung up when it's unloading the iptable modules. anyone else having this problem?

Dies
26th January 2008, 01:15 AM
haha, i'm not alone. it seems like Synaptic is better with these types of things, installing everything the OS needs at the same time instead of bits and pieces as they become available.

and my PC won't shut down properly. it keeps getting hung up when it's unloading the iptable modules. anyone else having this problem?

It's not Synaptic. Synaptic is just a front end. Ubuntu's repos move at a much, much slower pace than Fedora ones, just look at the software versions / kernel that Ubuntu is on and compare to Fedora.

BTW Ubuntu even though it moves much slower has also screwed it's users with broken updates a few times.

As someone mentioned earlier, if you're having problems with the newer kernel, just use the old one, that's why it's there. ;)

cooltd825
26th January 2008, 04:13 AM
It's not Synaptic. Synaptic is just a front end. Ubuntu's repos move at a much, much slower pace than Fedora ones, just look at the software versions / kernel that Ubuntu is on and compare to Fedora.

BTW Ubuntu even though it moves much slower has also screwed it's users with broken updates a few times.

As someone mentioned earlier, if you're having problems with the newer kernel, just use the old one, that's why it's there. ;)

well, maybe i've just been having bad luck with Fedora compared to Ubuntu.

haha, that's actually what i did. i basically wiped the new kernel off the face of the earth (or my computer, at least). but now the updater keeps bouncing around at the top of my screen like some sort of Mac application, so i'll figure out how to shut it off from the startup programs. oh well, i'll wait till Fedora 9 comes out and just upgrade the kernel then. i mean, it's coming out what....late April? i can manange till then.

Dies
26th January 2008, 05:16 AM
su -
system-config-services


Stopping any services you don't need is one of the first things you should do after installing Fedora. And if you're new to Fedora have a look around mjmwired's site since it's pretty awesome, especially the install notes. ;)

Here's a good listing of different services and which ones you should/shouldn't disable.

http://www.mjmwired.net/resources/mjm-services-f8.html

szandor
29th January 2008, 08:11 AM
A general rule I follow with Fedora is to run yum update and exclude kernel updates. I will wait until the kernel modules for Nvida are ready and I have had a chance to see if there are problems with the kernel update. Then I update the kernel and Nvidia. It saves you from much frustration.

when performing updates, i found 2 new ways to preserve the sanity of my system while being able to watch aqua teen hunger force as well as smoking the reefer all at the same time. the first one, which i use for individual or small groups of packages is the rollback feature of rpm. set up yum.conf and create a macro for rpm and i'm able to revert to the previous package(s) if the update causes problems. the second one which i've been using is mondo rescue + my /exclude directory. after my initial install of fc8 on my laptop, i first got everthing working under the kernel provided by the dvd. once all the hardware was working and everything was cleaned up. i.e. i move documents, movies, mp3s, etc. miscellaneous files to /exclude, i run mondoarchive, i exclude the /exclude dir and then backup the iso image to a 1.5gb bootable dvd all in one fell swoop. the backup to dvd process literally takes around 5 minutes. i tested the restore on another drive, which i'm actually using now, and the restore process took about 10 minutes. now if i want to 'yum update', i just move my miscellaneous files to /export, create my dvd, and then update every package on the box at one time and be done with it. in reality though, i still only update individual packages or kernel/nvidia on it's own but i still create a backup image after a major system update that's stable. unless the update provides a bug, security, feature, or nvidia update, i don't 'yum update' each time. i mean, if my sound is working and there's no benefit to updating a package, i'm not going to update it. especially if it's something like pulseaudio. gcalctool, not so much of an issue if it breaks. if i do 'yum update', it's after i've created a bootable backup dvd as i can always successfully restore, which might not be the case with --rollback. the downside to this though is i'm out 15 minutes and a nickel each time i create a dvd.