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pete_1967
18th October 2007, 12:59 PM
To those of you who use it:


Compared to the runaway success of Firefox, Mozilla's email client, Thunderbird, has always been the bridesmaid and never the bride. Increasingly in Firefox's shadow and laregly ignored by Mozilla, something drastic needed to be done - and in September it was.

Mozilla spun off a new company dedicated to the email client, allocated it $3 million, and told it to go make something of itself. We caught up with Dr David Ascher, the man appointed to lead the new company, to find out what the future holds for Thunderbird.


Read the full story at http://www.pcpro.co.uk/news/130046/from-webmail-to-facebook-the-future-of-thunderbird.html

Demz
18th October 2007, 01:30 PM
interesting, i thought they would of sold it to Netscape/AOL, looks like mozilla had brains afterall

Edit some Mod/Admin may wanna Move this thread to Wibble as its not really Linux related

sej7278
18th October 2007, 03:31 PM
so its not going commercial or anything then - i guess being foss we could just fork it anyway.

i guess by "for profit company" they mean making a few bucks from selling thunderbird t-shirts ;)

i can't stand webmail, so thunderbird is a must for me, i guess i could go to evolution but its too outlook-ish and novell-tainted for my liking, and it misses a feature i need (can't remember it - tls encryption maybe?)

tw2113
18th October 2007, 04:06 PM
thunderbird is a staple of my daily routine. It's used to check my former school e-mail account, my 2nd gmail account as of late, as well as being my feedreader.

Dan
18th October 2007, 04:26 PM
interesting, i thought they would of sold it to Netscape/AOL, looks like mozilla had brains afterall

Edit some Mod/Admin may wanna Move this thread to Wibble as its not really Linux related Actually, I think Software is a better choice.

Moved to Software

sej7278
18th October 2007, 05:58 PM
thunderbird is a staple of my daily routine. It's used to check my former school e-mail account, my 2nd gmail account as of late, as well as being my feedreader.

yeah something i've toyed with in thunderbird is rss, but i just don't really see the point of it, i just go to the websites to see what's new, rather than getting headlines from rss.

tw2113
18th October 2007, 06:29 PM
yeah something i've toyed with in thunderbird is rss, but i just don't really see the point of it, i just go to the websites to see what's new, rather than getting headlines from rss.
Mostly I skim through them, and then open the interesting articles in a browser. The rest just get marked as "read"

scotta3234
18th October 2007, 06:35 PM
Speaking of the future of thunderbird... how about a junk mail filter that actually works. Is it me or does thunderbird seem to not recognize junk and spam that well?? I would rather not turn on my junk mail control on my hosted mail server as it is extremely sensitive and doesn't let a lot of things through that i need. Any tips on this would be appreciated as well.

Finalzone
18th October 2007, 07:28 PM
Speaking of the future of thunderbird... how about a junk mail filter that actually works. Is it me or does thunderbird seem to not recognize junk and spam that well?? I would rather not turn on my junk mail control on my hosted mail server as it is extremely sensitive and doesn't let a lot of things through that i need. Any tips on this would be appreciated as well.
Have you checked the adapted control in Account Setting--> Junk mail setting?

tw2113
18th October 2007, 08:12 PM
I haven't had too much trouble with junk mail but the main e-mail account for it is monitored by a university.

sej7278
18th October 2007, 09:09 PM
Speaking of the future of thunderbird... how about a junk mail filter that actually works. Is it me or does thunderbird seem to not recognize junk and spam that well?? I would rather not turn on my junk mail control on my hosted mail server as it is extremely sensitive and doesn't let a lot of things through that i need. Any tips on this would be appreciated as well.

i've found the best way is to tune spamassasin on your server so its not too over-zealous and only marks (not delete) the email, then select "trust sa headers" in thunderbird - your sa-marked stuff will go straight to your junk folder, but you won't lose any emails.

scotta3234
18th October 2007, 10:11 PM
i've found the best way is to tune spamassasin on your server so its not too over-zealous and only marks (not delete) the email, then select "trust sa headers" in thunderbird - your sa-marked stuff will go straight to your junk folder, but you won't lose any emails.


This sounds like this might be the best option, a combination of the two. I actually just noticed that i can use the SA headers feature from inside of thunderbird. do you happen to know what your quarantine levels are set at at the moment?

codergeek42
1st November 2007, 05:01 AM
Speaking of the future of thunderbird... how about a junk mail filter that actually works. Is it me or does thunderbird seem to not recognize junk and spam that well?? Be sure that the "Adaptive Junk Filter" is enabled. Aside from that, you just need to train it for your email, specifically marking what is and what is not Junk. Marking non-junk is very important too! I've found that marking non-Junk along with what is Junk significantly increases the "learning" speed and accuracy of its junk filter.

Trapper
1st November 2007, 09:50 PM
Speaking of the future of thunderbird... how about a junk mail filter that actually works. Is it me or does thunderbird seem to not recognize junk and spam that well?? I would rather not turn on my junk mail control on my hosted mail server as it is extremely sensitive and doesn't let a lot of things through that i need. Any tips on this would be appreciated as well.

I know of no junk filtering integrated into any email client that gives the performance we really want, especially if we are using multiple accounts, mailing lists, etc. in our client. I've been running POPFile on Fedora for use with T-Bird for several years. It filters just about 30 email accounts from various domains and deals with a number of mailing lists too. My detection accuracy has always been right around 99% all during this time. It deals with 6000+ emails per month, accurately and easily.

I use no RBL's, etc. There's no need to. I simply have T-Bird filter all POPFile spam tagged mail to a set folder for review. Review mostly consist of simply looking at the subject, sender, recipient, etc. I can review tons of email in seconds and be assured that what I am deleting without opening is valid spam. That cannot be done by RBL rejecting. With rejecting you're never sure you really got all your valid email...and you probably didn't.

Most of all though, I'm very happy that none of my accounts constantly end up with undetected spam in them. False positive and false negative corrections in POPFile are quite minimal.

I don't know if Fedora offers a POPFile install package. If they do it's probably a system wide install, meaning that all users on a machine probably work from the same database, which isn't real cool. One mans trash may be anothers treasure.

I have a different instance of POPFile for each user on the machine. POPFile is set to shut down when a user logs out and starts when the user logs in. That way each user has a personal database.

I install from source and there are a few tricks to it because the site's install instructions are rather old and technology changes so much these days that I doubt they care to keep up with all Linux flavors, and I don't blame them.

Just for the record, elsewhere I run a postfix based email server for a number of domains. I use POPFile there too, but with the SMTP module rather than POP3. It outperforms SpamAssassin there too and gets the same accuracy results I experience with the POP3 module. The users receiving mail off that server have it made. All they have to do is set up their mail client to filter tagged mail to a junk box and don't have to worry about setting up a practical spam scanner at all. They just have to forward an occasional detection error back to the server where a correction in its POPFile database is done.

Mivo
1st November 2007, 10:36 PM
I used Thunderbird for some three years, but eventually switched to Evolution. The PIM features and the better integration were the main reasons. Thunderbird isn't a bad email client, but I needed a more complete solution. Also, I job-wise depend on good IMAP support, and that is one of TB's weaknesses. I had plenty of trouble with that over the years. KMail did better, but was unstable overall, and Evolution has, so far, the best IMAP support that I have seen in a client.

StephenH
1st November 2007, 11:44 PM
Speaking of the future of thunderbird... how about a junk mail filter that actually works. Is it me or does thunderbird seem to not recognize junk and spam that well?? I would rather not turn on my junk mail control on my hosted mail server as it is extremely sensitive and doesn't let a lot of things through that i need. Any tips on this would be appreciated as well.
Scott,

I set up a "whitelist" filter in Thunderbird that has worked very well for me.

First, I went to the message filters in the tools menu and created a new rule that I called, simply enough, "address check"

These are the two rules I created in it:

Match all of the following:

From isn't in my address book Personal Address Book
From isn't in my address book Collected Addresses

Perform these actions:

Move Message to Junk on (account name)
Set Junk Status to Junk

Save this and make sure it is active. Any message that arrives that isn't in your address book(s) will go to the junk mail folder. If you get one there that should not have been flagged, just add the address to your personal or collected address book, and future messages from that sender will arrive in your in box. You can then unflag the one(s) you want to keep and move them to your inbox so they won't get purged.

This has worked very well for me. It may work for you too.

Respectfully,

Stephen

Trapper
3rd November 2007, 01:34 AM
I set up a "whitelist" filter in Thunderbird that has worked very well for me.

I never have been so fortunate with white listing when it comes to current day spammer tactics.. Perhaps because of my large volume of mail or large numberof accounts I deal through. Most spam has a forged "From" address anymore. When I use heavy whitelisting I get forged spams ending up in the inbox all the time simply because that address is on my whitelist. Therefore, I have no T-Bird whitelist and my POPFile whitelist is very, very minimal. Because of POPFile's superior Bayesian filtering scheme, in relation to T-Bird's Bayesian process, whitelist are pretty much unnecessary. I use POPFile whitelisting for mailing list mail and that's about it.

I do see your point though and am sure that in many cases it works quite well. My situation is not in the norm and requires a different strategy, obviously.

scotta3234
3rd November 2007, 03:21 AM
Thank you all for the information you have provided me. My original statement was more of an observation (or rant if you will) of what appeared to be happening me with the most recent edition of thunderbird-that i was receiving unusual amounts of junkmail. I did not seem to have this happen in older versions, so it was more a comment that something had obviously changed in the way thunderbird handled junk mail. Maybe it's just that spammers are getting smarter in their methods :p