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rajani
16th August 2007, 09:51 AM
red

Hai all ,

I have a small query reg fedora core 7 , I have dual boot in my computer , Windows Xp and Fedora core 7 and i have bsnl dataone internet connection .....

My problem is in my internet speed , when i connect to the internet using windows XP i am getting download rate of around 160Kbps and my bandwidth is around upto 2 mbps .... :)


but the problem is when i connect using fedora i am getting download rate of around 14kbps its really slow ...... what can do for this problem ..... :confused:

Thanks in advance ..... :)

twn250
16th August 2007, 12:17 PM
Are you connecting to the same "download source" in both XP and Fedora.
Which software to download are you using in XP vs Fedora?

gala_dragos
16th August 2007, 02:34 PM
Same here! I have 768kbps in Windows and 364kbps in Linux. Funny thing is that 2 weeks ago had 1mbps (max connection speed) in Linux. Now after some "tweaking" speed is down! Test were done using www.speedtest.net (flash required).

rajani
17th August 2007, 07:40 PM
oh god i tested with both speakeasy , dataone no change still the same

internet is really slow , i cant do anything with this its really frustrating... :mad:

any way thanks for u r reply.... :)

if u have any update just pass it on ..... thanks in advance ..... :)

twn250
18th August 2007, 12:45 AM
I fired up XP on my machine to compare the download speed, and it was fairly the same download speed compared to F7.

This is most certenly not a firewall problem, but in lack of anything else, can you try disable your firewall?

su -
service iptables stop

zenarcher
18th August 2007, 03:51 AM
I'm going to say that I don't think Fedora has a speed limit on it. I just ran an upload/download speed test on my Fedora 7 and attached it as a thumbnail.

Cheers,
zenarcher

dubb
19th August 2007, 08:21 PM
same here internet is dog slow. i dont have a dual boot, but i find it takes 10 seconds to pullup mozilla's google search start page. usually it takes 1 or 2 seconds to pull up the start page. i just installed fedora 7 last night.

CD-RW
19th August 2007, 09:18 PM
I have up to 8MB. When it's quiet, like early hours of the morning, sometimes I get 4.5MB D/L speed. How do you manage to get 9MB D/L speed zenarcher?

zenarcher
19th August 2007, 10:23 PM
Well, it was sort of a two fold project. First, I got rid of the worthless Motorola Surfboard cable modem I had from the cable company and replaced it with a Linksys cable modem. That in itself improved my speed something near 15%. Then, I went ahead and paid the cable company ransom, which amounted to an additional $10.00/mo. for their highest speed home package. Between the two efforts, that's what I ended up getting. I've checked several times during the day and the speed remains quite consistent.

I've also noticed a quality improvement (although it was acceptable before) to my VoIP phone service. I've used VoIP for almost four years and at it's worst, it was better audio quality than our local carrier, here in a fairly rural area. I have three wired computers through my Linksys router, as well as two wireless and the VoIP phone...and really am quite satisfied now.

Cheers,
zenarcher

The New World
19th August 2007, 11:36 PM
I just upgraded to 8mb myself and this is all I get

http://www.speedtest.net/result/173294748.png (http://www.speedtest.net)

I Thought it would be better than that :confused:

marko
20th August 2007, 12:45 AM
the new world:

I don't know if you're consistently getting slow tests but
don't just do one speedtest, do several and try speed tests that are geographically
close. For example if you live in New York, don't speed test to a hawaii server
but go to a speed test in Albany or New Jersey or somewhere else close.
Try both java and flash tests (some places use flash, it has no benefit
but just makes the test pretty) I suppose the use of flash won't hurt, that
just loads down the video card a small amount or maybe the cpu but
won't hurt the network test(?)

Mark

zenarcher
20th August 2007, 02:50 AM
Marko is absolutely right. A single test really won't give you an accurate picture. You need tests at different times of day. And, as pointed out, do try ones which are geographically close. Several of the speed test sites will allow you to pick a server closest to your area. Others will select for you.

I don't find much variation in mine at different times of day, however on occasion, I will a significantly reduced speed for one reason or another.

The New World...if you routinely see that kind of speed out of an 8MB connection, I'd certainly take it up with your provider and see what they find. If you just upgraded, I'm assuming that your rebooted your modem before running that test. Sometimes, rebooting the modem is necessary.

Cheers,
zenarcher

dubb
20th August 2007, 06:14 PM
I know its slow because I can tell by the way pages load. Especially the mozilla firefox start screen. That should take 1-2 seconds instead of 10. Theres gotta be some kind of setting for the internet or some port. or perhaps a firewall. My router configurations are default. But thats probably not the case.

The New World
21st August 2007, 12:02 AM
I actually have done several tests I just chose that particular one to use here's one using zenarcher's choice Download 1986 kbps upload 254 kbps These were using Firefox the last was swiftfox I will try seamonkey to see if that makes a difference and I will see what my dads 2mb XP box puts out.

gala_dragos
21st August 2007, 09:37 AM
Marko is absolutely right. A single test really won't give you an accurate picture. You need tests at different times of day. And, as pointed out, do try ones which are geographically close. Several of the speed test sites will allow you to pick a server closest to your area. Others will select for you.

I don't find much variation in mine at different times of day, however on occasion, I will a significantly reduced speed for one reason or another.

The New World...if you routinely see that kind of speed out of an 8MB connection, I'd certainly take it up with your provider and see what they find. If you just upgraded, I'm assuming that your rebooted your modem before running that test. Sometimes, rebooting the modem is necessary.

Cheers,
zenarcher


I agree with multiple tests but I don't agree with the closest server. Why? Because we are trying to measure global (international) download speed and not the local speed of my network. Locally I can get up to 50Mbps, inside resident network, with 10mbps max within my country limits. External speed it's another thing! I can get close to 1mbps download almost everywhere in the world. As you see there is a great gap between in country speed and international speed (a 10 times gap!!!). Internet is meant to be worldwide not just locally so the relevant speed of my internet connection is 1mbps and not 50mbps which I get in the resident network !!!
Secondary, the source of download has a very big effect over the download speed. Why! because it can limit the speed. It happen to me on many occasions especially while downloading through DC++. A download which in the first minute had 500kbps or more suddenly dropped at an incredible speed of just 10kbps. So the download source has a BIG effect over the download speed!

Try other sources and remember to distinguish your external speed from your local speed.

By the way, how much do you pay for your 8Mbps connection zenarcher?

gala_dragos
21st August 2007, 09:41 AM
Forgot to say not to use the new seamonkey 1.1.4 because it's full of bugs! The most annoying of them all is the fact that you "loose" your keyboard, you cant type or use key within seamonkey. Try the old 1.1.3 version because it's much stable.

zenarcher
21st August 2007, 11:09 AM
gala dragos, I should have been a bit more clear on what I was saying about the closest server. You are correct. I generally will try various servers...closest as well as others, if I'm trying to get a real average on what I'm getting...just as trying at different times throughout the day.

Another point I forgot to mention is that of physical cable (wire) quality. I've been a ham radio operator since 1967 and worked in commercial radio for a few years, so have played with a lot of coaxial cable, not unlike that used in my cable system. Old cable and cheap cable can have a real bearing on the speed, as well, due to a buildup of attenuation in the cable from moisture and other factors. I've noted a similar situation in the past with telephone "twisted pairs," due to physical connections loosening up over time and getting corrosion.

With cable, I've had a couple of personal experiences, due to bad connectors up to and including on the cable company's box, coming into my house and with signal leaks through the cable. In one instance, with a 100mw handheld tranceiver, I was able to literally wipe out the cable television signal on my own television. A certain sign of leaking cable or bad connectors. Since I could inject a signal into the cable with low power, it is obvious that their signal was also leaking from the cable, thus creating a situation of unintentional interference with other services. A phone call to the cable company and citing a couple of Federal Communications laws had them out to find the leak and fix the problem within a day.

Likewise, the cable company can check the attenuation on the cable from their box on the pole to your connection inside the house. Over time, old cable will experience increased attenuation due to moisture, etc. Recently, I had mine checked, as I knew the cable was several years old. The cable company agreed and replaced the cable from their pole to my house as well as completely rewired all of their cable in my house. Having done so, both my television signal and my upload/download speeds improved significantly.

I'm just saying, as part of troubleshooting, never exclude the possibility of some faulty cable or connectors on your cable line. In fact, where I live, the cable company told me they have a problem with squirrels chewing through the outer shielding on the coaxial cable, allowing for the entry of moisture. They run regular checks for breaches of that nature.

As for the cost of my service, I pay $55.00/mo. for the top package they offer. They have four packages, starting at $29.95/mo. Rather expensive on my Social Security retirement I suppose, but one I can justify, since playing with these computers is pretty much my main hobby. And, of course, being retired, I have a lot of time to annoy the cable company.:)

Cheers,
zenarcher

mikeylikesit
25th August 2007, 07:56 AM
I'm having trouble with FC7 internet connection speed as well. Looking up any page on my FC7 box takes roughly 6 times as long as looking up the same page on my XP box.

One thing I've noticed, however, is that if I first ping the host I'm trying to look up (www.google.com for instance) and then insert the IP address directly into my browser, it loads just as fast as the XP box.

So I think there is some issue with domain name lookup, but I don't know enough to know where to look next. Any ideas?

mikeylikesit
25th August 2007, 10:23 AM
I finally found what was causing the problem. There is a great thread here: http://www.linuxquestions.org/questions/showthread.php?p=2216752.

Basically, it is IPv6 domain name resolution that causes the problem (at least in my case). If you have several PC's on an internal network and your Windows boxes work fine, but you have an FC box who's connection is slow, then you should definitely check out that thread.

One other way to tell if this is your problem, is if you bypass domain name resolution altogether. By this I mean to ping the desired domain (like www.google.com), and paste the ip address you get directly into your browser. If you're having IPv6 domain name resolution issues, you'll get to the address really quick( or at least as fast as it's supposed to be) with the direct ip address, and extremely slowly if you put the name of the host in the browser address bar (i.e. www.google.com).

Hope this helps some people. It seems there are a lot of people with this issue, but very few of the threads had anything useful to my particular situation.

dubb
25th August 2007, 07:45 PM
I finally found what was causing the problem. There is a great thread here: http://www.linuxquestions.org/questions/showthread.php?p=2216752.

Basically, it is IPv6 domain name resolution that causes the problem (at least in my case). If you have several PC's on an internal network and your Windows boxes work fine, but you have an FC box who's connection is slow, then you should definitely check out that thread.

One other way to tell if this is your problem, is if you bypass domain name resolution altogether. By this I mean to ping the desired domain (like www.google.com), and paste the ip address you get directly into your browser. If you're having IPv6 domain name resolution issues, you'll get to the address really quick( or at least as fast as it's supposed to be) with the direct ip address, and extremely slowly if you put the name of the host in the browser address bar (i.e. www.google.com).

Hope this helps some people. It seems there are a lot of people with this issue, but very few of the threads had anything useful to my particular situation.

nope didnt work for me.

gala_dragos
25th August 2007, 07:46 PM
doesn't works since FC6

marko
26th August 2007, 01:30 AM
As a diagnostic test you could try manually looking up an address, make sure it's a fresh one so it's
not cached:

host -4 someaddress.com

if that's really fast to reply but then this is slower:

host someotheraddress.com -- make sure this is different from that other one AND not a cached one

then it could be the latency of trying ipv6 resolution first, then after time out going to
ipv4, the -4 option tells host to only use ipv4 right now.

Mark