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ihavenoname
16th May 2007, 10:36 PM
Hello, I'm looking into buying a laptop with the 64bit Core 2 Duo processor. I want to know from your experiance what the best 64bit distro? I am not a novice, not to sound elitest or anything, but I also don't want to HAVE to do things the hardway. My question is simple, what is the "best" 64bit distro? By that I mean which distro has 64bit support for everything (it would be nice if the package manager was good at deal w/ 64bit as well, I hate having to hack around that). Also I am wondering, have you noticed performance gains from using a 64bit OS as opposed to a 32 bit os?

Any advice at all about 64bit is welecome. I ask here because I have seen Fedora users to not be TOO bias about distros. If fedora is the best one then excellent, if not I am not too worried. I just want a good 64bit distro that is also fairly stable (without being outdated)

AlphOmega
16th May 2007, 11:31 PM
Ubuntu is raved about for simplicity so maybe try their 64 bit.

As for noticeable difference, nope none. However, I some times compress rather large files into archives and this is noticably faster on 64 bit, but day to day stuff cant tell the difference.

hiberphoptik
16th May 2007, 11:45 PM
Ubuntu is raved about for simplicity so maybe try their 64 bit.

As for noticeable difference, nope none. However, I some times compress rather large files into archives and this is noticably faster on 64 bit, but day to day stuff cant tell the difference.


I agree.. in fact when F7 comes out Im going to install the 32-bit version on my 64-bit machine because I won't have to have multiple versions of the same app/libraries, 32-bit compatible nvidia libraries, hacks to get flash to play in firefox, and various other 64-bit headaches

ihavenoname
17th May 2007, 12:51 AM
Ubuntu is raved about for simplicity so maybe try their 64 bit.

As for noticeable difference, nope none. However, I some times compress rather large files into archives and this is noticably faster on 64 bit, but day to day stuff cant tell the difference.


Well, the thing is the apt doesn't have 64bit support, yum does, so I thought it would be better on fedora. Though from what I have heard from people on Ubuntu, the only things are browser related (java and flashplugins) and sometimes ndiswrapper doesn't work so well.

BNiels707
17th May 2007, 03:12 AM
For general desktop use, go with a 32 bit distro of your choice. It'll be easiest in the long run.

If you are doing work that goes faster with 64 bit, use Fedora or Solaris. Hardware support is worse in Solaris (in my experience anyway), but its as close as you can get to a pure 64 bit OS. Otherwise, a good blend between the two (work and desktop use) in my experience is Fedora.

ihavenoname
18th May 2007, 02:50 AM
For general desktop use, go with a 32 bit distro of your choice. It'll be easiest in the long run.

If you are doing work that goes faster with 64 bit, use Fedora or Solaris. Hardware support is worse in Solaris (in my experience anyway), but its as close as you can get to a pure 64 bit OS. Otherwise, a good blend between the two (work and desktop use) in my experience is Fedora.
Thanks for your help everyone. I think when I get time I'll try 64bit just to see for myself, but I will probably end up sticking with 32 bit.

Jongi
18th May 2007, 07:18 PM
I tried a 64bit install in FC. It was more work than it was worth.

Vansolrick
18th May 2007, 09:04 PM
Hmm I've been running FC6 64bit and have had no problems at all. It's nice to be running 64bit if you need the extra performance boost of extra ram and apps that work better in 64bit. There's nothing wrong with running 32 apps in a 64bit os.Certain things like Flash don't come in 64bit yet so you have to install a 32bit browser to use it, or hassle with nspluginwrapper. In fact your 64bit pc isnt a true 64bit system anyways; its a 32bit system with 64bit extensions. Having a 'pure' 64bit os is just stupid and a limit to yourself.

I like FC more than Ubuntu in 64bit. It's really just opinionated. You can also try Gentoo.. that one will give you a lot to work with though.

Also I'm not being biasd incase you are wondering. I have run only 2 distros in 64bit and thats Ubuntu and Fedora and I've personally found Fedora to be better for usablility and stability. But give Ubuntu a run if you want. Just try it out yourself and see what you like more. :D

Tellik
21st May 2007, 04:40 AM
I've never run Ubunto, but I have been runing 64bit FC6 since it's inital release, actually the day before :)

Granted, there were a lot of path finding, troubleshooting, headeaches at first, but my graphics works great, I'm using the windows 64bit driver for my wireless card (ndiswrapper - I had problems with the bcm43xx plus it's not quite as developed), I run 64bit firefox with the formentioned nspluginwrapper and I didn't find it much of an effort.

In general I've been quite happy, FC6 is more developed now than initalliy

Side note, I even run 32bit windows programs in wine (those which run in wine) specifically world of warcraft

just my 2 cents

cr22rc
30th May 2007, 01:11 PM
With regard to if there are differences ... I just started playing with 64bit F7 RC2 .. I have java compiles/builds (ant) that take 17 min and some change with 32bit jdk With 64 bit jdk it always is over 18min. Never seen the the 64bit come to with in a minute of being slower. Now I didn't expect a miracle here but thought on a 64 bit os it would come in on par.

fcc
22nd October 2010, 12:20 AM
As implicit in AlphOmega post, who finds a difference between 32 and 64 bit distributions only in the compression task (which together with matrix handling is one of the worst task you can impose to a computer) I would like to stress that "the best distribution" depends on what you usually do. See also BNiels707's advice.
No doubt that you would not like to cripple a 64 bit cpu using a 32 bit OS. The 64 bit distribution will handle a 64 bit cpu at its best, but are you sure that your programs really take advantage of the 64 bit words? Many popular programs lacking a continuous maintenance do not. Many of these use the long words only to increase the size of the files, and the increase in computing time is often hidden behind the increased cpu speed.
Remember the case for "double precision" in FORTRAN, and other languages of that time?
I mean that it's not only the distribution that you should look at.
fcc

smr54
22nd October 2010, 02:45 AM
Not sure how applicable any of the posts prior to yours are in 2010. :)

(We've all come across old posts, not noticed how old they are, and responded. I think this thread is probably pretty dead though.)

forkbomb
22nd October 2010, 04:54 AM
It's debatable how much of the anti-64-bit stuff was FUD back in 2007. :p

sonoran
22nd October 2010, 06:00 AM
Most if not all of it, from my experience. But for those still pondering this type of question, I find the Arch Linux MultiLib implementation pretty nice:

http://www.archlinux.org/news/true-multilib-for-arch-linux-x86_64/

cneil
15th November 2010, 04:09 PM
Hello, I'm looking into buying a laptop with the 64bit Core 2 Duo processor. I want to know from your experiance what the best 64bit distro? I am not a novice, not to sound elitest or anything, but I also don't want to HAVE to do things the hardway. My question is simple, what is the "best" 64bit distro? By that I mean which distro has 64bit support for everything (it would be nice if the package manager was good at deal w/ 64bit as well, I hate having to hack around that). Also I am wondering, have you noticed performance gains from using a 64bit OS as opposed to a 32 bit os?

Any advice at all about 64bit is welecome. I ask here because I have seen Fedora users to not be TOO bias about distros. If fedora is the best one then excellent, if not I am not too worried. I just want a good 64bit distro that is also fairly stable (without being outdated)

IMO Fedora 14 is the way to go.

This is what I am using and it works well.
Neil

fcc
15th November 2010, 08:19 PM
Right now I do not have laptops.
What I can say is that almost all my fellows in the department (or about the 40 that I know) have a laptop, and can be roughly divided in three almost equal groups: one prefers Suse, the other one Fedora, the third (mostly students) goes with Ubuntu, Mandriva, Sabayon, ..., whatever.
Many of them complain about the battery management, but I guess that this depends upon the particular hardware, and the irregular use of their laptops.
fcc

xpzion7
16th November 2010, 06:11 AM
Fedora 14. works well.

cybercon
4th December 2010, 04:07 AM
i had fed13_64bit and later upgraded to fed14_64bit, everything works well under Gnome desktop. I ran several virtual machines in cross-platform with Window based and linux apps. Before I used to have work with dual-boot mode. Now, I go linux straight all the way using fedora 14 64bit, and its more stable.