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CD-RW
10th February 2007, 03:49 PM
Hi all. I'm in the process of getting my head around the GIMP, and looking forward to getting a digital camera to use with FC6, and Linux in general.

I'd like to take some digital piccys of countryside scenes, computer hardware, etc. and put them on my website.

I'm considering a digital camera that has a USB port.

1) What software do I need to transfer the digital images from the camera to the computer?

2) Is there a list of digital cameras that would work with Linux?

Seve
10th February 2007, 04:02 PM
Hello:
Any software you need is provided either by default or with yum.
Sorry, off-hand I can't recall all the packages.

There was an earlier thread about a similar request.
http://forums.fedoraforum.org/forum/showthread.php?t=140977

Seve

Dan
10th February 2007, 04:44 PM
Hi CD-RW

1) just about anything built by Fujifilm works great.

2) For landscape, zoom is important. Therefore, I recommend the Finepix S5200 -- S6000 -- or the S9100. All plug & Play in Linux. No fuss, no problems.

3) I settled on the S5200 for work. Although, I believe I'll get an S9100 be the end of spring for personal use.

4) A Warning! I first tried to order through Best Buy, and went a few rounds with their non-regional non-English speaking phone support people. After a few infuriating days of dealing with them about their failure to complete the order, ship the product, and about those nifty bogus charges that cropped up on my credit card, I went elsewhere and reported them to the fraud division of the my bank.

Then I tried Dell. Again, non-regional phone support by non-English speaking call center workers. Also a 14 day delay expected in shipping. :cool: Not acceptable!

Then I discovered a family owned and operated camera shop in Michigan named "Norman Camera." No muss, no fuss, professional customer service, and my new camera got here in two days. www.normancamera.com They'll set you right up. I worked with a guy named Brett. Very competent, very professional, very friendly. ...

... And, most importantly, no credit card fraud! :mad:

Best Buy is definitely on my poo-poo list!

Dan

Jongi
10th February 2007, 04:47 PM
1. I use digiKam

2. My Sony works. I suspect as long as it has USB capabilities, at the least it will be recognised as a drive and you will be able to transfer the pictures to the relevant folder.

terry_g
10th February 2007, 05:13 PM
I use and like gthumb for a photo viewer. My Olympus C4000 and Canon Digital Rebel and Canon 30D cameras all work well. The older Digital Rebel had to be set to PTP mode. When you connect the camera Gthumb opens a dialog that shows thumbnails of the pictures in the camera and lets you select which ones to download. Downloading pictures from a camera can take a lot of battery power. I invested in a card reader a $20 value, remove the memory card from the camera and put in the card reader and a USB storage device appears on the desktop with the pictures in it.

Plossl
10th February 2007, 05:23 PM
Not sure how professional or fancy you want to get, but I recently needed and bought a simple point-and-click digital camera, and it has worked great with FC 6.

It is an HP Photosmart R725. I paid $175 for it and a 256MB SanDisk SD card, taxes included. No software or driver installation was needed, and it loads the pictures in jpg format. At the default resolution, an image is about 2MB.

John the train
10th February 2007, 05:55 PM
I use and like gthumb for a photo viewer. My Olympus C4000 and Canon Digital Rebel and Canon 30D cameras all work well. The older Digital Rebel had to be set to PTP mode. When you connect the camera Gthumb opens a dialog that shows thumbnails of the pictures in the camera and lets you select which ones to download. Downloading pictures from a camera can take a lot of battery power. I invested in a card reader a $20 value, remove the memory card from the camera and put in the card reader and a USB storage device appears on the desktop with the pictures in it.
I've got a card reader that takes pretty well all the usual memory cards - so my three cameras to date have all used Compact Flash! As terry_g says, it saves on battery power, and if you're using several relatively small cards, which some people do as an insurance against a card being lost/going bad, it saves a bit of juggling. If you look at a higher spec model which offers the option of saving in RAW it's an idea to check if it's supported in dcRaw or Ufraw.

CD-RW
10th February 2007, 06:12 PM
Thankyou for your replies.

I have just found this site for comparing the specs of different manufacturers digital cameras. http://www.dpreview.com/ There are also various user reviews for the camera(s) they have bought.

It seems that all I need is a USB camera, gphoto2 and DigiKam. Possibly a power supply for the camera as well. I was also told to get a 512MB XD memory card, to allow plenty of room for storing pictures.

$ gphoto2 --list-cameras provides a nice list of supported cameras. As mentioned here and in other posts, all that is probably needed is a camera with a USB port. I see that Konqueror can also be used to connect to a digital camera, with the URL of camera:/

I'm not sure exactly what I will be using the camera for, but I want a reasonable quality one with an optical zoom. I keep hearing the name FujiFilm crop up.

Here is an interesting article on digital cameras that I found quite eye-opening.

http://blogs.zdnet.com/Berlind/?p=339

Thanks again!

teishu
10th February 2007, 06:25 PM
alot of digi cameras, show as removable drives and are automatically mounted when plugged in :)

CD-RW
10th February 2007, 06:26 PM
Downloading pictures from a camera can take a lot of battery power. I invested in a card reader a $20 value, remove the memory card from the camera and put in the card reader and a USB storage device appears on the desktop with the pictures in it.

Sounds like a good idea terry_g.

I was under the impression that you could connect a camera to the USB port, and the camera would take it's power from that USB port?

I did check out a *very* cheap digital camera on my laptop, under XP (blushes!). There were no batteries in the camera, and I was still able to take some pictures with it, and download them to the laptop. Would this also work under Fedora Core? Or is it due to the make of the camera itself?

Dan
10th February 2007, 07:04 PM
I'm not sure exactly what I will be using the camera for, but I want a reasonable quality one with an optical zoom. I keep hearing the name FujiFilm crop up. I went to the Fujifilm FinePix S5200 for three reasons.

1) 1 gig highspeed XD memory cards. Fast as h*ll, and it's "Load once - shoot all week." ... At max resolution, it will hold 400+ shots.
2) 10X optical + 5.7X digital for a 57X total zoom (You can count the spots on the ladybugs across the yard.) :p
3) 5.1 Mega-pixels is plenty good enough for print work in magazines or newspapers. In fact, it's more than you will ever actually need. Oh yeah! One more reason!

$239.00 ... plus shipping. :D

Dan

smackey72
10th February 2007, 07:21 PM
Hi all,

I received a Pentax Optio A10 as a gift last Christmas. So far I have been very happy with it. I plugged it in via USB and FC6 mounted it right up as a drive on my desktop and I was able to move and manage pictures without installing any software. That is awsome.

Note: this camera comes with low memory installed. It would only hold 7 pictures at maximum quality. I found a 2GB SanDisk SD memory card for $35. Now I can take 700 pictures at maximum quality or 1 hour and 20 minutes worth of video /w sound.

CD-RW
10th February 2007, 10:55 PM
2) 10X optical + 5.7X digital for a 57X total zoom (You can count the spots on the ladybugs across the yard.) :p
Dan

Can you actually use a combination of optical and digital zoom together then?

Doesn't using the digital zoom degrade the picture at all?

Dan
11th February 2007, 02:33 AM
Can you actually use a combination of optical and digital zoom together then?

Doesn't using the digital zoom degrade the picture at all? The best thing would probably be to check into it here, yourself, so I can't screw something up and get it wrong! :p

http://www.fujifilmusa.com/JSP/fuji/epartners/digitalS5200Overview.jsp?item=I836806&dbid=836806&urltype=overview&NavBarId=I836806

Wayne
11th February 2007, 02:50 AM
This is basically a Canon house, all the 35mm SLR's are Canon of various vintage except one Pentax 6x6. We also have 2 Canon digital cameras, an older A200 and a slightly newer Powershot S80. I suppose we like Canon lenses :) I also have lurking about my very first digital camera, a Sony Digital Mavica that uses floppy disks for storage :eek: That cost an arm and a leg!

Wayne

Plossl
11th February 2007, 03:21 AM
I also have lurking about my very first digital camera, a Sony Digital Mavica that uses floppy disks for storage :eek: That cost an arm and a leg!

Wayne
I bet it didn't cost more than the Hasselblad H3D 31 megapixel (http://www.dpreview.com/news/0701/07012902hasselbladh3d-31.asp). :eek:

John the train
11th February 2007, 09:27 AM
Can you actually use a combination of optical and digital zoom together then?

Doesn't using the digital zoom degrade the picture at all?
Digital zoom has the same effect as enlarging the picture area in imaging software, same number of pixels spread over a larger area, so yes, it will degrade the picture, but if you shoot at highest resolution and don't zoom too much it won't be too noticeable. For instance, it might reduce your 8MP camera to an effective 5MP, which might be acceptable, depending on your requirements.

Wayne
11th February 2007, 10:55 AM
I bet it didn't cost more than the Hasselblad H3D 31 megapixel (http://www.dpreview.com/news/0701/07012902hasselbladh3d-31.asp). :eek:

No, not quite :D I think it was between 90,000 and 100.000 yen when I got it, no idea what that is in foreign currency :p

Wayne

Dan
11th February 2007, 04:08 PM
Can you actually use a combination of optical and digital zoom together then?

Doesn't using the digital zoom degrade the picture at all? Morning.

John is absolutely right. Just like using an enlarger in the darkroom, there is no way to bend the rules of physics. Optical or digital zoom means less light information collected and displayed. That will always have resolution consequences. The very best way to shoot is to leave the lens opened up on wide angle ... and get in tight with your subject. Any form of photography besides landscape (and even that to some degree), is a close-up medium.

That, also and especially, includes shooting video! The rule of thumb is, get a second or two of establishing shot, use a middle range only if you have to, then get in tight on your subject(s) ... and stay there! Only pull back out to follow action, include a second sublect (if they get close enough), or to re-establish if you've had to change scenes or had to violate the 180 degree rule.

So, the best solution is always to gather as much of the wanted information as you can, and eliminate or minimize the information you don't want. In short, Get in tight before you click the shutter!

Oddly enough, that's why so many Americam amateur snapshots look so amateur. Sociologically, Americans are a wide-open-spaces kind of people. Especially those from rural areas. Proper social spacing distance is generally greater than 12-16 feet. Getting any closer than that tends to make one, or the other's skin crawl a bit, so one or the other will move away, or back up until a proper distance is reached. It happens on a sub-conscious basis. We don't even know we're doing it. Therefore, most American amatuer photographers won't "Get in the subject's face!" to get the decent shots. Most Europeans, on the other hand, are used to being squished into small cars, overcrowded trains, and generally packed in like sardines! So they'll let you get quite a bit closer before they start giving you non-verbal (and sometimes quite verbal) social sanctions for getting into their personal or intimate space. :p

Dan



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