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xGutsAndGloryx
19th December 2006, 11:30 PM
I am want linux to become second nature to me. I am looking for all the books & materials to help me on journey. I am wanting to learn everything: how to operate in the terminal, troubleshooting linux, learn how to operate all program that came standard with linux,networking, & etc . i am wanting to become a guru. i know it will take a lot of work. i have wanted to do this since i was 15... i would appreciate any help at all. i am online every night.

JN4OldSchool
19th December 2006, 11:39 PM
As someone just starting my own journy I can tell you I have learned more from this forum than any other source. Also, buy a spare hard drive, partition off the one you have, build/buy a modest spare computer and/or load up VMWare, but however you do it play with as many Linux OS's as possible. They all have their unique little quirks and you will learn so much. When you can successfully install 95% of all the distros without breaking a sweat I would say you were well on the way to gurudom! You want to learn volumes? Go here:

http://www.gentoo.org/doc/en/handbook/handbook-x86.xml

read through it once carefully. Then get your stage 3 tarball and do it. Man, when I finished this the first time I was walking on air!!! And it really isnt that hard. You want to see hard?

http://www.linuxfromscratch.org/

If you can do this then I bow to your guruness!

Last but not least, we learn by doing, by getting our hands dirty. You can accelerate it as fast as you can take things, but just by using Linux on a daily basis you will learn. Have fun and I will be asking your advice in 6 months so stay in touch!

xGutsAndGloryx
19th December 2006, 11:46 PM
As someone just starting my own journy I can tell you I have learned more from this forum than any other source. Also, buy a spare hard drive, partition off the one you have, build/buy a modest spare computer and/or load up VMWare, but however you do it play with as many Linux OS's as possible. They all have their unique little quirks and you will learn so much. When you can successfully install 95% of all the distros without breaking a sweat I would say you were well on the way to gurudom! You want to learn volumes? Go here:

http://www.gentoo.org/doc/en/handbook/handbook-x86.xml

read through it once carefully. Then get your stage 3 tarball and do it. Man, when I finished this the first time I was walking on air!!! And it really isnt that hard. You want to see hard?

http://www.linuxfromscratch.org/

If you can do this then I bow to your guruness!

Last but not least, we learn by doing, by getting our hands dirty. You can accelerate it as fast as you can take things, but just by using Linux on a daily basis you will learn. Have fun and I will be asking your advice in 6 months so stay in touch!




hahah... i just installed a different distro... i was working with fedora core 6....i thought it would be interesting.. i am running ubuntu 9.10 now..

xGutsAndGloryx
19th December 2006, 11:49 PM
i have installed fedora core 4 & 6, red hat 9, & ubuntu 6.10 version of linux without a problem... the only thing is configuring drivers, installing plugins, & other various programs... thats what i am having trouble with..

JN4OldSchool
19th December 2006, 11:50 PM
ahhh edgy! I hated ubuntu till I loaded 6.10 kubuntu. Then I went back and tried dapper drake. Not too shaby! I like edgy. Not my first pick in a distro but not bad...not bad at all...

xGutsAndGloryx
20th December 2006, 12:01 AM
any advice on getting better with configuring drivers, installing various plugins, & installing various other programs?

AlexThomson_NZ
20th December 2006, 12:08 AM
Ditto what OldSchool said. Learn by doing.

What I find helps is answering questions asking in forums, etc. even if they don't nessesarily relate to your situation- if you don't know the answer- google and find out (have not yet had a problem that couldn't be solved by googling!), that way you get to help out other people AND learn at the same time. If you hear of a phrase/word/application/acronym you don't know- find out about it (make notes)

Learn the basics of the core concepts:
* Linux command-line & scripting (bash)
* Filesystems and mounting (FAT32/ext2)
* Networking (IP addresses/Gateways/DHCP)
* Windows managers + GFX (Gnome/KDE/installing video drivers)
* Installing (yum/synaptic)
You should be about to answer maybe 25% of questions asked in the forums. Once you get the basics down, learn more advanced concepts of these core concepts:
* Linux command-line & scripting (perl/phython/reading logs)
* Filesystems and mounting (resier/xfs/ntfs)
* Networking (samba/wireless/ifconfig/iwconfig)
* Windows managers + GFX (XFCE/e17/compositors/Xorg.conf)
* Installing (rpm/compiling)
By this stage, you should be answer maybe 75% of general questions asked (especially if you sus out wireless networking ;) ). To get into more detail for any of these, you will probably have to start specialising (ie. you would be doing well to know everything about perl AND be a AD guru AND follow the daily changes to the -ck kernel patches, etc.

Another recommendation is joining a local linux users group- they are generally quite newbie friendly (as long as you are polite), and is great for 'the personal touch'.

Wow- this is getting long- another thought though- use a couple of distros regularly (if you want to be a 'jack-of-all-trades'). Preferably as different as possible- maybe Fedora, and KUbuntu.

It sounds like you are doing everything right so far though! Keep it up :)

xGutsAndGloryx
20th December 2006, 12:19 AM
Ditto what OldSchool said. Learn by doing.

What I find helps is answering questions asking in forums, etc. even if they don't nessesarily relate to your situation- if you don't know the answer- google and find out (have not yet had a problem that couldn't be solved by googling!), that way you get to help out other people AND learn at the same time. If you hear of a phrase/word/application/acronym you don't know- find out about it (make notes)

Learn the basics of the core concepts:
* Linux command-line & scripting (bash)
* Filesystems and mounting (FAT32/ext2)
* Networking (IP addresses/Gateways/DHCP)
* Windows managers + GFX (Gnome/KDE/installing video drivers)
* Installing (yum/synaptic)
You should be about to answer maybe 25% of questions asked in the forums. Once you get the basics down, learn more advanced concepts of these core concepts:
* Linux command-line & scripting (perl/phython/reading logs)
* Filesystems and mounting (resier/xfs/ntfs)
* Networking (samba/wireless/ifconfig/iwconfig)
* Windows managers + GFX (XFCE/e17/compositors/Xorg.conf)
* Installing (rpm/compiling)
By this stage, you should be answer maybe 75% of general questions asked (especially if you sus out wireless networking ;) ). To get into more detail for any of these, you will probably have to start specialising (ie. you would be doing well to know everything about perl AND be a AD guru AND follow the daily changes to the -ck kernel patches, etc.

Another recommendation is joining a local linux users group- they are generally quite newbie friendly (as long as you are polite), and is great for 'the personal touch'.

Wow- this is getting long- another thought though- use a couple of distros regularly (if you want to be a 'jack-of-all-trades'). Preferably as different as possible- maybe Fedora, and KUbuntu.

It sounds like you are doing everything right so far though! Keep it up :)

do you know where i could a local linux user group? do you know where i can find information on the basic concepts you listed? i am having a problem with decephing error message too? can you help me out with that too?

pete_1967
20th December 2006, 01:07 AM
[QUOTE=xGutsAndGloryx]do you know where i could a local linux user group?
[quote]

http://www.linux.org/groups/ and for the rest click here (http://www.google.com/linux) to get you started.

Dan
20th December 2006, 01:16 AM
Good afternoon, GutsAndGlory

I think you can start right here.

http://rute.2038bug.com/index.html.gz

There is a downloadable version available there too.

Also see these.

http://www.redhat.com/docs/manuals/linux/RHL-9-Manual/getting-started-guide/
http://www.redhat.com/docs/manuals/linux/RHL-9-Manual/security-guide/
http://www.redhat.com/docs/manuals/linux/RHL-9-Manual/admin-primer/
http://www.redhat.com/docs/manuals/linux/RHL-9-Manual/ref-guide/
http://www.redhat.com/docs/manuals/linux/RHL-9-Manual/custom-guide/
http://www.redhat.com/docs/manuals/linux/RHL-9-Manual/glossary/

That should get you started

Dan

AlexThomson_NZ
20th December 2006, 01:35 AM
do you know where i could a local linux user group? do you know where i can find information on the basic concepts you listed? i am having a problem with decephing error message too? can you help me out with that too?

http://www.luna.huntsville.al.us/ (North Alabama)
http://www.salug.org/ (South Alabama)

Find information on basic concepts by reading books, or using google/forums if you want specific information.

Deciphering error messages, well- doesn't the error message itself tell you what is wrong? If you have a specific error message you need help with, just ask (or google). Unless you are doing something insanely different, the answer will be on the internet.

Seriously- google is your friend, and if I could offer one tip for a newbie- don't ask questions that are very easily answerable using google, people like to see you make some effort to answer it yourself!

rappermas
20th December 2006, 05:35 AM
http://www.linuxfromscratch.org/

If you can do this then I bow to your guruness!

Challenge accepted.
:)

joe.pelayo
20th December 2006, 05:38 AM
You can start reading here http://easylinux.info it will help you to get started, then forums like this are the best way to learn (at least for me) thanks to the community.

JN4OldSchool
20th December 2006, 05:38 AM
Challenge accepted.
:)
Bah, you dont count! You could write your own bloody OS from scratch... :D

rappermas
20th December 2006, 08:04 AM
Bah, you dont count! You could write your own bloody OS from scratch... :D
LOL, the alpha version would be better than Vista :)

Actually, since that post, I'm almost half way there, but I decided to stop so that I could possibly get some sleep tonight as well as have time to raid the forum. The book they have said that it takes 15 minutes to compile binutils on the fastest system and I did it on a Pentium D 930 (3.00 GHz) in 8 minutes, in VMware, single threaded. Kinda makes me think that maybe the LFS project needs hardware donations.

But since I've started, I realized that this could be a useful thing. My school needs some web test servers, so I'm going to make a bare-bones LAMP (Linux_Apache_MySQL_PHP) system with Gnome (gotta remember these are windows n00bs). I might end up using KDE to make it look like Windows XP because the admins in my school are hard-core n00bs about this stuff. The last thing I want to do is add another distro to the pile of thousands already out there. Just a little niche thing to make life easier for web developers (me).

So I've been give even more purpose. Good, now I have to manage a game engine, a custom linux system, 50 other things...I guess I won't have time to get revenge on IRC.

xGutsAndGloryx
20th December 2006, 06:57 PM
[QUOTE=xGutsAndGloryx]do you know where i could a local linux user group?
[quote]

http://www.linux.org/groups/ and for the rest click here (http://www.google.com/linux) to get you started.



there isn't a local user group in my area.. what do i do?

pete_1967
20th December 2006, 07:04 PM
there isn't a local user group in my area.. what do i do?

Go buy some ice-cream or to the nearest pub and get plastered or start a new LUG.

Seriously, how should we know?

rappermas
20th December 2006, 07:14 PM
[QUOTE=pete_1967][QUOTE=xGutsAndGloryx]do you know where i could a local linux user group?




there isn't a local user group in my area.. what do i do?
Learn it on your own or start a group.

Dan
21st December 2006, 12:48 AM
POST EDITED:

Son,

You've been given the world here, but you must pursue it!

That is all.

Dan