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egoh
18th December 2006, 09:26 PM
Hi all...

I read somewhere (don't have the link) that most linux file systems work best when kept under 80% full. Is this true?

I have two drives, both 500GB. One is setup with the default FC5 partitioning (LVM) and the other is is ext3. I'm currently at 82%-87% full on both drives and I'm concerned I already need to upgrade my storage.

Any advice would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks!

paul matthijsse
18th December 2006, 10:09 PM
Hi all...
I read somewhere (don't have the link) that most linux file systems work best when kept under 80% full. Is this true?Don't think so. Sounds as an "old" rule to me, applying perhaps to 100 MB drives. You have 1000 GB available, why Linux should stop working as advertised when you are at 800 GB? Still 200 GB to go....

I have two drives, both 500GB. One is setup with the default FC5 partitioning (LVM) and the other is is ext3. I'm currently at 82%-87% full on both drives and I'm concerned I already need to upgrade my storage. You store a lot of stuff! My common dataset is less than 40 GB; including music and photos. Just buy another disk, why not, but don't forget to make proper backups of all that, because disks *do* break sometimes...

Cheers, Paul.

egoh
18th December 2006, 10:26 PM
Thanks Paul,

I do have another machine that I rsync to so I'm all good with backups. Yeah, I have a ton of stuff. I think I have over 60GB in photos alone (product of having a digital SLR I guess).

I found the article: http://www.newsforge.com/os/03/10/07/2028234.shtml

It's the second to last paragraph that basically says fragmentation might be a problem if you exceed 80 or 90% utilization.

paul matthijsse
20th December 2006, 10:57 AM
It's the second to last paragraph that basically says fragmentation might be a problem if you exceed 80 or 90% utilization.Hi egoh, I just read the article and that 80-90% figure does not apply to your large disks, because you still have 100 of 200 GB available -- really a lot. The article states as well that Linux systems are "far more resistant to fragmentation than Windows machines".

You can run fsck -f though, to check your fragmentation level. I just did that a couple of days ago on my disk, it said 2.1% non-contiguous (that is 2,1% fragmentated). Not bad for a disk that served me 1.5 years every day -- and no reason to defrag.

Cheers, Paul.

egoh
20th December 2006, 07:53 PM
Paul,

Thanks for your help! You've saved be a ton of time and money since I don't need to upgrade my storage for a little while longer.

Thanks!

paul matthijsse
20th December 2006, 09:43 PM
you' re welcome! Buy a free x-mas beer of all the money I saved you! -:)