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Wiles
10th August 2006, 01:45 PM
Yesterday I installed a linuxant modem driver on my computer, but this morning, I couldn't boot up.

Booting gets stuck at udev.
I got a message like

starting udev unable to handle kernel page request.

Can someone tell me how to use the fedora rescue disc so I can reinstall that portion of fedora?

mrothlein
10th August 2006, 01:53 PM
Does your computer boot in into GRUB? If so, you may be able to select a previous kernel and troubleshoot from there. You would only have a previous kernel if you have installed an update to do so.

You can possible try troubleshooting with a Knoppix CD. My initial thought is that if the driver installation really messed up the computer, try to remove it using the "rpm -e softwarenamehere" from a terminal. If you cannot do this from Knoppix, maybe you can boot to a prompt of some sort.

Sorry, I'm a noob, but these are some things to think about. You may want to wait for the experts to weigh in on this one.

Wiles
10th August 2006, 02:18 PM
Does your computer boot in into GRUB? If so, you may be able to select a previous kernel and troubleshoot from there. You would only have a previous kernel if you have installed an update to do so.

You can possible try troubleshooting with a Knoppix CD. My initial thought is that if the driver installation really messed up the computer, try to remove it using the "rpm -e softwarenamehere" from a terminal. If you cannot do this from Knoppix, maybe you can boot to a prompt of some sort.

Sorry, I'm a noob, but these are some things to think about. You may want to wait for the experts to weigh in on this one.

thanks, however it wasn't installed via rpm.

I installed from a tar file, so how would I remove it?

Can I just reinstall the system and kernel files, if so, how?

u-noneinc-s
10th August 2006, 02:22 PM
Boot from installation CD 1 (or DVD). At the installation screen type linux rescue. Follow the prompts to boot into rescue mode. When it boots, type chroot /mnt/sysimage and hit enter. remove the linuxant driver as suggested by mrothlein. exit (twice I think). You should be all set. (Don't forget to remove the CD/DVD)

EDIT: To remove a compiled program, you should be able to go to the installation directory (where you unzipped it and installed it from) and run uninstall. If there is no uninstall option, I don't know. You'll have to find where the packages installed to and remove them manually.

rappermas
10th August 2006, 05:21 PM
Generally, most people should avoid installing tarballs and use RPMs and yum to install most programs. Tarballs are hard to compile, hard to remove, and hard to work with. That said, it's not the end of the world. Pop in your Fedora installation and type:
linux rescueThat will get you into rescue mode. Follow all the prompts and let it configure your keyboard, network device. Also, let it mount the system image. You'll get a shell powered by sh--it's simple and crude, but it gets the job done. Now, type in:
chroot /mnt/sysimageThat will let you work with the Fedora installation. Hopefully, at this point, you remember where you installed the package and hopefully, you still have an original copy of the source code that you built from. The first thing that I would do is take a look at the originial source code with the more command to find out what instructions they include. To use the more command, which displays text a page-full at a time so that humans can read it, type in:
more <filename>Obviously, you'd replace <filename> with the name of the file that you want to view. So you've navigated over to the original tarball and now you're sitting inside it. Type in:
lsThis will let you view the list of files that reside within the directory that you're currently in. You might want to use the more command that I described earlier to take a look at files like README and INSTALLATION that usually come with every tarball. If they don't give you directions on how to uninstall, then you have to do it yourself. The first thing that you should do is browse over to the place where the tarball was installed. Now, if you can't find this, which is usually the case, you can search for it:
cd /
find -name "<nameofProg>"
Obviously, you'd replace <nameofProg> with whatever you're searching for. It will list a bunch of instances where you can find the file. If there are too many of them and you can't read them, you might want to redirect the output to a file and view that, like this:


cd /
find -name "<nameofProg>" > /tmp/results.txt
more /tmp/results.txt

That should help you read the file much more easily. Once you find where the tarball was installed, change your directory to the place where it was installed and try to see if there is any command there that says uninstall, or something similar. You may try to run it in one of several ways. Let's assume that the uninstall file is called "uninstall". You would first try to run this:
./uninstallAssuming you're in the same directory as the uninstall binary, the program should get uinstalled. This might be a makefile, though, too, which have the capability to build software, install it, and remove it. You might try to type in:
make uninstall. If neither of these two methods work, unzip the very original tarball, build it, install it, and then run:
make uninstallIf all goes well, your software should be uninstalled and you should be able to return to Fedora normally.

Best of luck!

Wiles
10th August 2006, 07:03 PM
thanks!

That did the trick!

rappermas
11th August 2006, 02:46 AM
thanks!

That did the trick!
Someone read my long and complicated and convuluted instructions? And followed them? And they actually WORKED? You're welcome. :D

u-noneinc-s
11th August 2006, 03:09 AM
Someone read my long and complicated and convuluted instructions? And followed them? And they actually WORKED? You're welcome. I was actually going to comment on that long and complicated explaination. Like "I hope you didn't say that all in one breath!" :D Actually, it wasn't "that" complicated. However, I would have never been able to put that in words.