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DarkSoul1985
7th August 2006, 01:57 PM
Hi I would like to know how I can remotely operate a fedora linux install and where I can find a list of basic commands. Searched the fedora site but all whas about installation, the fedora will be installed for me.

So far I found

mkdir hlds
cd hlds
wget url
chmod +x file
(dont know what +x stands for...)
/. file (no idea what this does)

Can someone help me? Is there some faq somewhere? Also what tool is best used for remotely sending these commands?

Wayne
7th August 2006, 02:03 PM
Hi I would like to know how I can remotely operate a fedora linux install and where I can find a list of basic commands. Searched the fedora site but all whas about installation, the fedora will be installed for me.

So far I found

mkdir hlds
cd hlds
wget url
chmod +x file
(dont know what +x stands for...)
/. file (no idea what this does)

Can someone help me? Is there some faq somewhere? Also what tool is best used for remotely sending these commands?

There are sites that show DOS commands and their *nix counterparts, one such place is:

http://www.linuxforum.com/linux/app2.html

Wayne

markkuk
7th August 2006, 02:08 PM
chmod +x file
(dont know what +x stands for...)
It means "add the execute permission".

/. file (no idea what this does)
It does absolutely nothing. Perhaps you meant "./file", which runs the executable "file" from the current directory.

DarkSoul1985
7th August 2006, 02:22 PM
I do not see commands on that site for memory usage, cpu usage etc, is there some other way I should check my remote server? Perhaps with something like I use for windows realvnc remote controlling?

rappermas
7th August 2006, 04:17 PM
I do not see commands on that site for memory usage, cpu usage etc, is there some other way I should check my remote server? Perhaps with something like I use for windows realvnc remote controlling?

topShows you the most processor intensive processes and the cpu and memory usage right from the terminal. Here's a hack to find out how many processes you're running:

ps ax | wc -l.