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Altstatten
19th July 2006, 11:49 PM
I've looked for an hour and I can't find an explanation about how to move backwards and forwards, etc. in directories. Can someone provide me with a few examples on how it';s done in FC5 please.

Seve
19th July 2006, 11:56 PM
Hello:
You can use the default Applications /SystemTools/File Browser
the rest should be intuitive [i.e. up down forward back etc.], if not post back.
From the CLI use the cd command and then just use the up or down arrow if you want to call back a previous command.
Seve

Altstatten
20th July 2006, 12:00 AM
Are you telling me that using the cd command with the directory address is the same as it is in Windows? (I thought it was different.)

pparks1
20th July 2006, 01:51 AM
The command to change directories at the command line is cd.

The primary difference to Windows is that Windows uses the notion of a drive letter (A:, C:, ), while Linux does not. In addition, the slashes in Windows are back slashes (\) while in Unix/Linux it's a forward slash (/).

cd /root : will take you to root's home directory.
cd .. : will move you back 1 directory.

binarybird
20th July 2006, 05:38 AM
pparks hit it on the head....

the only thing I would add is you can combine the ".." to move back multiple directories at once:

example say you were in /usr/local/src and you wanted to just get back to /usr you could enter from the command line -

cd ../../ and it will bump you back to the parent directory of /usr. Add as many ../ as needed to go back.

If you forget where you are you can enter pwd and it will Print your Working Directory

Just remember that in Linux (as parks already said) everything hangs from the root directory...affectionately notated as "/". Adding the "/" infront of your directory choice tells the OS to start from the root point.

IE - # cd /etc/X11/

it is different from # cd etc/X11

With out the slash you tell Linux to start from your pwd.

:)

BandC
20th July 2006, 04:17 PM
It should be very clear by now but I thought I'd point out that a difference between Windows cd command and Linux cd command is:

In Windows: cd.. works
In Linux you have to type the extra space between cd and .. so it is: cd ..