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matt3830
19th July 2006, 09:06 AM
I have a Dell Dimension 4700 with two sata hard drives. The first one is an 80gb with partitions for windows xp and fedora. The second hard drive is for go between storage. I'm having two problems:

After installing Fedora, my computer is automatically booting into Fedora. I installed it into the free space that I made from windows xp (the exact install option said "Use free space on selected drives and create default layout"). But now I want to get back into windows xp and can't figure out how.

The other problem I'm having is I can't see my second hard drive in fedora. It just shows me the the filesystem, cd drive, and network. I'd like to be able to read what's on there.

clariedy
19th July 2006, 02:13 PM
Into fedora, Open terminal, need to login account root!

1.alter /etc/grub.conf. I'm sorry, I am not very familiar with the English language!
2.Maybe your hard disk jumper problem.

Linux_Weary
19th July 2006, 02:45 PM
Did you install the grub bootloader? It is the default with fedora. If yes, than when your computer boots grub should kick in and do a countdown saying preparing to boot fedora. If it does this than hit a key and in the menu choose your windows xp installation.

If no such option exists than edit your /boot/grub/grub.conf file by typing: gedit and then the path and file aforementioned. I dont know the exact lines so you'll have to google it.

Its something like:

Title windows xp
root (hd0,0) **note hd'0', 0 is the number of the hardrive given by bios in the order it detects them. If windows xp is installed on the first hard drive and the first partition than this root command would be correct. (the second 0 indicates the first partition and counts up from zero)**

chainloader +1

try googling it to see if this is exactly it.

Dan
19th July 2006, 03:59 PM
Hi Matt,

When your computer boots, as soon as you see the GRUB (first blue background) screen, tap the [enter] key. You will then be able to choose which operating system to boot into.

Hope it helps.

Dan

matt3830
19th July 2006, 04:12 PM
Yep that worked. I'm able to boot into these three options:

Fedora Core (2.6.17-1.2157_FC5smp)
Fedora Core (2.6.15-1.2054_FC5smp)
Other

Why are there two named Fedora? "Other' is actually Windows xp.

Dan
19th July 2006, 04:46 PM
Nice work!

It looks like you've updated the kernel at least once. I think yum keeps one old backup kernel just in case of a failure. Now. you can log into the root account, drill down to: ["/boot/grub/grub.conf"] and edit this file to change not only the ["other"] to read ["Windows XP"] but you can also change the default boot OS. ["default=2"] or change the amount of time you will have to make up your mind. ["timeout=30"]

Hope it helps,

Dan

matt3830
19th July 2006, 06:33 PM
OK, I've got the dual boot working and also installed flash, adobe and java. I still can't see my second internal harddrive. It's a 200gb sata drive that I formatted with ntfs, I'm using it for music, movies etc. How can I read this drive (I think Fedora Core still has problems writing to ntfs).

commonplace
19th July 2006, 06:40 PM
OK, I've got the dual boot working and also installed flash, adobe and java. I still can't see my second internal harddrive. It's a 200gb sata drive that I formatted with ntfs, I'm using it for music, movies etc. How can I read this drive (I think Fedora Core still has problems writing to ntfs).

Read and follow Stanton Finley's guide (stanton-finley.net/fedora_core_5_installation_notes.html#NTFS).

sickrupi
19th July 2006, 06:49 PM
The second hard drive has to be formatted as a vfat filesystem in order to be recongized by Linux. Unfortunately linux cannot write to NTFS filesystems. Only reads them. Correct me if I am wrong guys. Try googling for the command to convert to a vfat filesystem.

commonplace
19th July 2006, 06:52 PM
The second hard drive has to be formatted as a vfat filesystem in order to be recongized by Linux. Unfortunately linux cannot write to NTFS filesystems. Only reads them. Correct me if I am wrong guys. Try googling for the command to convert to a vfat filesystem.

Linux absolutely reads NTFS, and write support is also supported, although in my experience, writing to NTFS has been flakey at best. If you plan on constantly sharing data between Linux and Windows, a FAT32 partition is your best bet. If you're fine with just reading data, NTFS is fine -- and write might work, too.

There's a few different NTFS projects out there, too, and you might have better luck with one than another.

But Stanton's guide should definitely let you mount and read NTFS partitions.

commonplace
19th July 2006, 06:53 PM
Also, as far as I know, there's no way to convert an NTFS partition to FAT without losing all the data, unless you use a third-party tool (e.g. Partition Magic).

matt3830
19th July 2006, 07:13 PM
OK, I'm going to try changing it to FAT32 and see if it automatically detects it. I originally set it up as NTFS, because reading around it sounded to be more stable. Any thoughts on that? Is FAT32 much less stable than NTFS?

commonplace
19th July 2006, 07:18 PM
You should be fine with FAT32, but keep in mind, Windows 2000/XP will read FAT32 partitions of any size, but it will only create them at a limit of 32GB. So, your best bet is to create/format the partition in Linux.

THE Ralfinator
19th July 2006, 07:25 PM
I myself use an 80 Gig partition for storage accessible to both Windows and Fedora, and I formated it as EXT3. I use EXT2IFS or something like that so that Windows can have full read/write access to it, and Linux supports it natively.

sickrupi
19th July 2006, 07:28 PM
OK, I'm going to try changing it to FAT32 and see if it automatically detects it. I originally set it up as NTFS, because reading around it sounded to be more stable. Any thoughts on that? Is FAT32 much less stable than NTFS?
The main problem with FAT32 is that when you create a file smaller than 32K in size, it will still take up 32K of clusters, due to the limitations of the file system.

FAT32 is slightly faster on smaller disks, because it doesn't have to add any extra flags/indexes to the files on it. However as the disk size and amount of data on the disk increases, the speed with which the FAT32 filesystem operates decreases significanlty.

matt3830
19th July 2006, 08:29 PM
I followed the installation instructions to be able to read ntfs drives. But when I try to browse the drive I get this error:
Cannot Mount Volume
You are not privileged to mount the volume 'DRV4_VOL1'.

It's also says the same thing if I try to browse another partition:
Cannot Mount Volume
You are not privileged to mount this volume.

sickrupi
19th July 2006, 08:34 PM
privilage problems are usually related to limitations of general user accounts to modify system files. are you logged in as root?

matt3830
19th July 2006, 08:37 PM
I tried logging in as root and got the same problem.

matt3830
19th July 2006, 09:56 PM
It seems to find all the drives, but can't mount them.

commonplace
19th July 2006, 11:35 PM
Can you post the contents of your /etc/fstab file?

matt3830
20th July 2006, 04:26 AM
/dev/VolGroup00/LogVol00 / ext3 defaults 1 1
LABEL=/boot /boot ext3 defaults 1 2
devpts /dev/pts devpts gid=5,mode=620 0 0
tmpfs /dev/shm tmpfs defaults 0 0
proc /proc proc defaults 0 0
sysfs /sys sysfs defaults 0 0
/dev/VolGroup00/LogVol01 swap swap defaults 0 0
/dev/sda1 /mnt/windows ntfs ro,defaults,umask=0222 0 0