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sapper6fd
29th April 2006, 05:40 AM
I'm realy wanting to learn how to use linux, specificly from the command line. Where is the best place to learn? Any suggested books for the complete noob?

I'm not so shabby with DOS, and one question I have is how different is Linux from DOS?

Are they any online resources that can help me out?

TimBenny
29th April 2006, 05:43 AM
Sure if you:) know how to google

sapper6fd
29th April 2006, 05:50 AM
I have googled, and most of that I have found is for the intermediate user or online courses charging $xxxx.xx for info. I wouldnt be asking if Google didnt turn me to mostly pay to learn sites. I'm not sure when the last time you googled "Learn linux" was, but I'm sure it just isnt the same.... Trust me.

Sites such as

http://linuxreviews.org/beginner/
http://www.groovyweb.uklinux.net/?page_name=linux%20tutorials
http://www.linux.com/article.pl?sid=02/03/09/1727250

and so on have been usefull, but I'm looking for more info.

robghealey
29th April 2006, 05:57 AM
This site is very simple and easy to learn. It is where I was pointed to when I was in your seat. I hope it helps.

http://www.linux.org/lessons/index.html

TimBenny
29th April 2006, 06:02 AM
:) they are nice sites

pinpon
29th April 2006, 07:22 AM
I have googled, and most of that I have found is for the intermediate user or online courses charging $xxxx.xx for info. I wouldnt be asking if Google didnt turn me to mostly pay to learn sites. I'm not sure when the last time you googled "Learn linux" was, but I'm sure it just isnt the same.... Trust me.

Sites such as

http://linuxreviews.org/beginner/
http://www.groovyweb.uklinux.net/?page_name=linux%20tutorials
http://www.linux.com/article.pl?sid=02/03/09/1727250

and so on have been usefull, but I'm looking for more info.
why didn't you post that earlier ?

sapper6fd
29th April 2006, 07:37 AM
Is it just me or are the only people on this site that are helpfull, all members with over 100 posts?

Thank Robghealey. You've been a great help. Its apreciated.

u-noneinc-s
29th April 2006, 09:20 AM
With the 3 sites you came up with you should have a pretty good start.
Don't want to sound "overly obvious", but there are many manuals and docs within Linux
If you are unfamiliar with man pages #man commandname will give you syntax and options for any command. (#man man which I tend to forget about is a good place to start).
Some are straight forward and some are nearly rocket science, but it does help and the more you work with
them, the easier the options/parameters etc become. There is also #info commandname.
Checkout bash with all it's builtins. Just type builtins in a terminal and you'll get lots of shell commands to work
with. #man bash and #man tcsh will give you more than you can shake a stick at.
For apps, #updatedb to get a slocate database, then something like #locate appname |grep doc will locate the readmes and howtos for many applications. updatedb needs to be run to update the DB regularly (if there have
been any changes or additions). #vitutor is a good one for learning to edit on the commandline (it might be vimtutor), and there is another editor tutorial but i don't recal what it is. Oh yeah, emacs but I don't recall the
tutor command. #man emacs will help you find it.
You can search man pages by typing /searchword (or string) and hitting enter. then n should take you to the
next instancce of that string shift+n will find the previous instance

blue13130
29th April 2006, 03:41 PM
Here is a good site that I found when I was learning how to use the terminal. It is just a list of common commands:
http://www.sloppycode.net/nix/

Zigzagcom
29th April 2006, 03:54 PM
You also learn by setting up your distribution as a server and playing with it. Here is a great tutorial:

http://www.brennan.id.au/

ccrvic
29th April 2006, 04:23 PM
I'm realy wanting to learn how to use linux, specificly from the command line. Where is the best place to learn?

The best place to learn is - your own computer.

Trite as that might sound, the only way you're really going to learn stuff is by doing it - so think about what you want your box to do, then build something that does that.

A couple of super-important tips :-

- Your box is stuffed full of documentation. Most of your problems can be solved by reading it. The easiest way to get at this documentation is with the command-line programme "man". man has its own documentation, so if you need to read up on it, use the command "man man". In particular, read up on "man -k", which often gives you a good way to get going on a problem.
- Google is your friend. Learn to select words and phrases that are likely to occur in any question or answer on the topic you're looking for, and you'll cut down (but never eliminate) the dross that pervades Google's database. Note that there is a linux-specific version of Google at http://google.com/linux . I'm told it's very good, but TBH, I usually forget about it until after I've found what I was looking for :-)
- Find yourself an editor that you like, and get familiar with it. I use vi, because that was very much the top dog when I started using Unix, but it's not exactly the friendliest of editors... It is pretty much guaranteed to be on any box you might come across, though, and the current version is really very good, so if you can cope with it, give it a go. If it confuses the crap out of you, use something like nano or joe instead.
- The command line is a powerful way of commnicating with your computer - but, like most languages, you do need to learn quite a bit before you can get your message across. I'd recommend installing somehing like Webmin to give you a GUI-based control surface; it''s less expressive (as is any GUI), but can make life much simpler if you don't know the commands yet.


Any suggested books for the complete noob?

I wouldn't bother. Linux is changing so very rapidly that, by the time a book is printed, much of its info will be out of date :-(


I'm not so shabby with DOS, and one question I have is how different is Linux from DOS?

It's very different. The command names are generally different, command-line switches use - or --. you don't have drive letters, you have a unified filesystem, pathnames use forward slashes, and you're running on a multi-user OS, with different permissions for different types of people. Really the most similar thing about them is that both will accept keybopard input...


Are they any online resources that can help me out?

http://tldp.org/ is useful if you know what you're looking for.
http://www.pathname.com/fhs/ is something you'll need to understand quite early on
http://userfriendly.org/ might keep you sane occasionally...

Vic.

Johnny Fist
29th April 2006, 04:27 PM
You could also take a course or two. Many local colleges offer classes on Unix and Linux. Barring the expense, that may be an option.

doublem9
29th April 2006, 05:54 PM
blue1313 thats exactly what i was looking for! this is a good topic

steve1961
29th April 2006, 06:24 PM
Linux books do go out of date very quickly but I've found some of the generic titles by O'Reilly useful - Linux Cookbook, Running Linux, Linux in a nutshell, Linux pocket guide, etc...

dshaw256
29th April 2006, 09:56 PM
There is a fairly good "bible" -- Red Hat Fedora and Enterprise Linux 4 Bible -- dated 2005 that's fairly good. I wouldn't buy the thing -- check it out of your local library. It will help get you oriented.

There's some good advice above about using the man command. I'd also recommend trying the info command; try "info info" to learn more about it. The content is probably not as complete as man, but the writeups are less terse and more well rounded, if you will.

brunson
30th April 2006, 12:39 AM
I'm not so shabby with DOS, and one question I have is how different is Linux from DOS?

DOS is to Linux as a skateboard is to the space shuttle. They're both forms of transportation. ;-)

sapper6fd
30th April 2006, 02:30 AM
Thanks guys, this has been a great help.

achidlow
30th April 2006, 03:31 PM
a suggestion... prehaps a mod could sticky this and we can build a list of sites containing linux stuff for newbies/intermediates?

jtravnick
1st May 2006, 12:20 PM
I realy do hate to say this but maybe it neads to be said from a noobs point of view. I personaly usaly try the man pages before I post a question, only problem is when I read them I feel like im reading latin. At least from my viewpoint it seems like there writen for ppl that already know a lot about linux. Even some of the files that I have to mod. like the smb.conf file for networking. I left that one scraching my head going what?

Anyway thats just my point of view usaly at least if I can find and read the man pages for something I hopefully have an idea of what to google.

Jim

dshaw256
1st May 2006, 10:47 PM
man pages are very, very terse. They're meant to be a reference, not a tutorial. You might try using info instead of man; I don't believe that info covers 100% of what's in man, but the explanations are much less terse, and it's a lot more tutorial in tone.