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  #1  
Old 19th September 2009, 01:50 AM
netstudios Offline
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windows_xp_2003ie
Unhappy hard drive not showing up

I just bought a brand new hard drive, installed fedora with no errors. However when I try to click on the hard drive i get this error

unable to mount physical volume, not a mountable file system, ( I only have 1 hard drive and fedora boots up fine, so its got to be working)

I installed hardware browser and no hard drives come up

some one please help me!!!
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  #2  
Old 19th September 2009, 01:56 AM
netstudios Offline
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linuxfedorafirefox
Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System
/dev/sda1 * 1 26 204800 83 Linux
Partition 1 does not end on cylinder boundary.
/dev/sda2 26 38913 312363841 83 Linux

Disk /dev/dm-0: 319.8 GB, 319858504704 bytes
255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 38887 cylinders
Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes
Disk identifier: 0x00000000

Disk /dev/dm-0 doesn't contain a valid partition table

Disk /dev/dm-1: 314.5 GB, 314564411392 bytes
255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 38243 cylinders
Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes
Disk identifier: 0x00000000

Disk /dev/dm-1 doesn't contain a valid partition table

Disk /dev/dm-2: 5284 MB, 5284823040 bytes
255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 642 cylinders
Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes
Disk identifier: 0x00000000

Disk /dev/dm-2 doesn't contain a valid partition table
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  #3  
Old 19th September 2009, 02:16 AM
netstudios Offline
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linuxfedorafirefox
please someone help
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  #4  
Old 19th September 2009, 03:03 AM
netstudios Offline
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windows_xp_2003ie
Iw ill pay someone right now to help me out,,,,let me know the paypal address
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  #5  
Old 19th September 2009, 05:10 AM
jpollard Online
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linuxfedorafirefox
It sounds like the disk is not initialized.

there are several ways to do this - fdisk, cfdisk,parted

Once the disk has a partition table you get to decide about logical volumes - This isn't really necessary for
a single disk, but if multiple disks are planned and you want to merge them into a single large volume...

Once you have partitions you can initialize a filesystem using mkfs. There are several different filesystems you
can use - ext3/4, xfs, ...

Now that the disks have valid filesystems they can be mounted and used by the system.

I hope it helps give some areas to look.
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  #6  
Old 19th September 2009, 05:26 AM
netstudios Offline
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windows_xp_2003ie
how

how do i do this?....sorry I am a newbie....but i do understand command prompts
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  #7  
Old 19th September 2009, 05:35 AM
ppesci Offline
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linuxfedorafirefox
I think so too. The disk must be initialized, that is you must create the partition table and format each partition.

Fedora reckons the drive, but do not reckons the partition table or the format of the file system.

HTH
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  #8  
Old 19th September 2009, 05:42 AM
netstudios Offline
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linuxfedorafirefox
please tell me how to fix...I am lost. but can follow directions
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  #9  
Old 19th September 2009, 04:35 PM
ppesci Offline
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linuxfedorafirefox
The easiest way is using gparted.

First, try to install it. As root user, type the command:

yum install gparted

then you can run it selecting from the system menu or typing gparted in console.

gparted is a graphic utility. Select the drive and then you can create partitions and format that partition. Is easy. If you have problems, tell us here.

Remember /dev/sda is your fedora disk, maybe your blank disk is /dev/sdb

HTH
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  #10  
Old 19th September 2009, 04:47 PM
parish Offline
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linuxfedorafirefox
Although I prefer to use the commandline tools fdisk and mkfs, an easier approach for you might be to use gparted. If it isn't installed, you can install it via yum install gparted. When it's run you will be presented with a window that shows all your devices, partitions, etc. From there you can select the empty device, write a partition table, and make the filesystem of your choice.

It should go without saying that you need to be very careful. If you select the wrong device or partition and initialize it, you will destroy your system and/or data.

Daniel


Oops, overlapping post...

Last edited by parish; 19th September 2009 at 04:50 PM.
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  #11  
Old 19th September 2009, 05:23 PM
jpollard Online
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linuxfedorafirefox
1. verify the identity of your new disk. Since you seem to have "dm" devices without valid partition tables, this
should be relatively straight forward. Use "cat /proc/partitions". This command will list devices and their
known partitions. In my case, all devices have partition tables:

$ cat /proc/partitions
major minor #blocks name

8 0 244198584 sda
8 1 204800 sda1
8 2 243991201 sda2
8 16 244198584 sdb
8 17 244196001 sdb1
253 0 233816064 dm-0
253 1 10174464 dm-1
8 32 58633344 sdc
8 33 58629186 sdc1

The disk device names all start with sd. Originally it ment Scsci Disk, but since there has been a unification between SCSI, ATAPI, SATA, and even USB disks (ATAPI and SATA and USB disks all use a subset of the SCSI
protocol) they all use the same base name.

The letter following sd (as in sda, sdb, and sdc) designate the order the disks were identified by Linux (presented
by the BIOS configuration too). This means that it is possible to have disks change their identity. For instance, If
I remove the disk sdb in the list, then on next reboot, Linux will identify the disk sdc in the list, as sdb. This renaming
can be handled by assigning a universal id to the disk for use in the fstab. Using the UUID allows for hotswap by
forcing the mount to search for the correct disk by locating the UUID on the disk to be mounted. As I don't swap
disks, this is optional.

The dm-0 and dm-1 partitions are logical partitions used by my Fedora installation. dm-0 is a duplicate name for
the root filesystem (sda1), dm-1 is swap. I personally don't use this, but the device mapper uses them to identify
the root and swap partitions during boot.

Uninitialized disks should show up as sdb or sdc. In the list above, I have one primary partition on each disk, so
there are added entries for sdb1 and sdc1.

These partitions are created by either cfdisk or fdisk.

cfdisk is the utility recommended by man pages (man fdisk, man cfdisk). fdisk is more "forgiving" of partition errors,
cfdisk is more strict, and can prevent errors. What I'm going to present is creating a single partition occupying the
entire drive (the simple case) intended for data storage.

run the program as "cfdisk /dev/sd<letter>" in a terminal window logged in as root. The <letter> corresponds
to your identified disk. This will bring up a display like the following. Note - I already have a partition on the disk
so what you see will be a little different - there should be options shown for creating a partition:
cfdisk (util-linux-ng 2.14.2)

Disk Drive: /dev/sdc
Size: 60040544256 bytes, 60.0 GB
Heads: 255 Sectors per Track: 63 Cylinders: 7299

Name Flags Part Type FS Type [Label] Size (MB)
------------------------------------------------------------------------------
sdc1 Primary Linux ext2 60036.32











[ Bootable ] [ Delete ] [ Help ] [ Maximize ] [ Print ]
[ Quit ] [ Type ] [ Units ] [ Write ]

Toggle bootable flag of the current partition
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Each of the options "[bootable] [Delete],,," will have some explanitory text at the bottom. You should have an
option for "New" to create a new partition. Since I haven't done this in quite a while, you may be reqested
to create a new partition before this window even shows. cfdisk can identify an uninitialized partition table.
The partition should be identified as a "linux" partition type. The type is used to help isolate problems from
other operating systems and use appropriate tool/filesystem types when trying to mount partitions.

Once created, you have to "write" the partition table to the disk. When finished, quit the cfdisk program.

List the partitions again (cat /proc/partitions). You should see the new partition present. cfdisk may ask that
you reboot the system. You can, but there should be an utility (/sbin/partx) that can tell the kernel to load
the partition table (the command should be "/sbin/partx -a /dev/sd<letter>"). Rebooting may be simpler.

Once rebooted list the partitions again (cat /proc/partitions). You really should see the new partition named like
"sd<letter>1".

The partition table has now been initialized. The next step is initializing the filesystem.

I usually just accept the system defaults and just use the command "mkfs /dev/sd<letter>1". This will most likely
create an ext2 based filesystem (did for me, but the defaults may have changed). Once nice thing about ext2
is that it is compatable with ext3 (a journaling filesystem), and can be changed after use.

The "mkfs" command will list a number of blocks, take a while to perform, and then finish up. Most of the
information can be ignored. The blocks being presented are redundancy information about alternate headers and
such. What is spends most of its time doing is creating the inodes for the filesystem. When it finishes, the disk
should be usable. A quick test is the command "mount /dev/sd<letter>1 /mnt". This should mount the disk
on /mnt. A df should show the new mount, size of the disk, number of inodes...

After testing, dismount the disk (/mnt is used for multi-media things).

If you want the disk mounted at boot you can continue on:

Decide where in the directory hierarchy you want the disk. Lets assume you want it as "/data".

In a terminal window (logged in as root):

mkdir /data

This will create an empty directory. You can manually mount the disk if you want ("mount /dev/sd<letter>1 /data").
and decide if this is reasonable. If not, dismount, delete the directory (or rename it).

edit the /etc/fstab file to add the line:

/dev/sd<letter>1 /data ext3 defaults 0 0

The first field is the partition to mount. The second field is the directory the partition will show up as.
The third is the filesystem type. ext3 is the journaling update to ext2 that I assume was created by the "mkfs"
command when the filesystem was initialized. It can be "ext2". the "defaults" are those that apply to the
filesystem. Normal is read/write. If a filesystem is to be read-only replace "defaults" with "ro". The two fields
with "0" are used for determining when/how mounts are done, and when/how backups are done. 0 in the
first position helps track system backups (depending on how you do them), the second determines the order
the mount is done during boot.

0 in this position is reasonable, as the root filesystem will already be mounted (has to be to even find the startup
scripts), so mounting /data on the first pass is reasonable.

If you have a number of disks (/a /b /c) and you decide that you wanted a new disk (z) mounted under a (/a/z)
then you can't really mount the z until after the "a" is mounted. It makes sense then to have 0 for the a,b and c
entries, and 1 for the z.

Hope this helps. It isn't complete, especially with respect to error recovery. But it can get you started.

Once you are comfortable with having identified the disk, you can play with the partition table, (create more, delete
some, resize...). Try out the logical volumes... You can actually play with raid configuration by putting multiple
partitions on a disk, then raid them together. (This is really only usefull for learning, if the disk fails you still
loose everything, and raid is intended for auto recovery...)
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