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  #1  
Old 2nd December 2008, 01:37 AM
Quasar8000 Offline
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Fedora 10 on the Eee PC 901/1000

With the official release of Fedora 10, I decided to make an updated tutorial on how to install it and configure it on the Eee PC 901/1000.

**UPDATE: Check out www.fedora-eee.com for the latest packages, and stay up to date through my Twitter account @Quasar8000**
Installing Fedora 10
1. Since the Eee PC does not have an optical drive, and the procedure I used previously for installing the full F9 on the Eee was too tedious, I decided to go for the Live CD this time. So you can start by downloading the Live CD image of your choice, then follow this simple tutorial to transfer the image to a USB Flash Drive.
2. Reboot the Eee PC and set the Flash Drive as the first booting priority using the BIOS.
3. Boot from the flash drive and install F10 on the Eee PC using the icon on the desktop.
4. I personally found the following custom partitioning scheme to be most useful:

Primary SSD (4GB):
196MB: /boot
The rest of the drive: /

Secondary SSD (16GB):
1010MB: swap
The rest of the drive: /home (Encrypted)

The encryption is naturally optional but it's much safer since the Eee PC is extremely portable
5. Reboot into your newly installed F10 and open the terminal. As root, type "gedit /etc/fstab", this should allow you to adjust the mounting settings of your local drives and partitions.
6. For each of your partitions (/, /boot, /home), add ",noatime" after "defaults". Save the file and exit. This should help reduce the number of writes the system does to the SSD which would extend its life, and should also make the system much faster.
7. Also in the terminal, type "gedit /etc/sysctl.conf", and add "vm.swappiness = 0" at the end of the file. This tells the system not to use the swap partition as swap, which has the same advantages as the previous step, and this way, we'll have a swap partition for hibernation.
8. Using F10, the wired networking works out-of-the-box, but to get the wireless networking to work, you need to download this Ralink driver, then in the terminal, as root, type:
Code:
yum install make gcc kernel-headers kernel-devel
9. Once the downloading and installation of packages are done, unzip the driver, and go to <Driver Folder>/os/linux. Open config.mk and change "HAS_WPA_SUPPLICANT" and "HAS_NATIVE_WPA_SUPPLICANT_SUPPORT" to "y" instead of "n".
10. Using the terminal, as root, go to the driver's folder and type "make", then once done, "make install".
11. Reboot your Eee PC and you should be all set

Enhancements
F10 uses the 2.6.27 kernel which has a new driver for the Eee PC. This driver uses rfkill to control the wireless network and Bluetooth and should handle the Hotkeys without external scripts. However, at this time, the wireless toggle Hotkey does not work, there's no way to control the Bluetooth from within F10 without rebooting and using the BIOS, and NetworkManager has problems with using rfkill alone to turn off the wireless network.
For these reasons, I compiled a customized kernel for the Eee PC. This kernel is less than half the size of the standard kernel, it loads much faster, and provides the option of controlling the Bluetooth from within F10. I also wrote a little script that can be used to toggle both the Bluetooth and wireless networking on or off without any problems. The kernel, kernel-firmware, kernel-devel, kernel-headers, and script, can be downloaded using this link. Once you download the package, and extract the files, you can use (in the terminal, as root) "rpm -U" to install the kernel-firmware and kernel-headers then "rpm -i" to install the kernel and kernel-devel, and you can copy the script to any location you like.
I removed the IPv6 packages from the kernel given that the vast majority of people don't use that protocol yet. However, F10 has an IPv6 firewall that will produce booting errors if it remains enabled, so in the terminal, as root, type the following commands:
Code:
/sbin/service ip6tables stop
then
Code:
/sbin/chkconfig ip6tables off
Now you can reboot and use the new kernel without any problems. You will have to recompile the wireless driver for this kernel of course
If you'd like to use the script I included, you have to make sure it's executable. You can do that using:
Code:
chmod a+x radio_toggle.sh
You don't have to be root to execute the above command, but you need to be root to execute it. The script is executed using:
Code:
./radio_toggle.sh
The script works as follows: If neither WiFi nor Bluetooth are turned on, running the script the first time will just turn on the WiFi, running it a second time will turn the WiFi off and turn Bluetooth on, a third time will turn both on, and a fourth time will turn them back off. If you wouldn't like to use the script or would like more freedom, you can use /sys/class/rfkill/rfkill0/state to control the WiFi, and /sys/class/rfkill/rfkill1/state to control the Bluetooth. Unfortunately, due to some problems with the initial state of the rfkill, both WiFi and Bluetooth are always turned on at startup, so they can be turned off by running the script only once.

All this hassle should be sorted out once the 2.6.28 kernel is released, since it has many bug-fixes and improvements which should make using the Fn+F2 Hotkey much easier, but for now, i still couldn't find a way to get everything to play nicely together.

Extras
There are a couple of extras that are not necessary but I felt are important to mention since I find them very convenient.
Code:
yum install lock-keys-applet gnome-applet-netspeed
Since the Eee PC keyboard doesn't have LEDs to indicate the Caps and Num lock status, the first applet can be used as an alternative. The second applet can be used to measure the current network connection speed which I find quite practical in many cases.

I guess that's all for the time being. Any feedback on this tutorial or the kernel is much appreciated And I would like to thank all those who offered me extra tips in the first tutorial which I used to make this one better.

Last edited by Quasar8000; 16th May 2009 at 07:48 PM.
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  #2  
Old 2nd December 2008, 01:48 AM
scottro Offline
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I moved this into the Guides and Howtos. It's a tossup where it belongs, but I think it *might* be easier to find. Also, this makes it clear that it's a howto as opposed to a question.
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  #3  
Old 3rd December 2008, 08:46 AM
cimh Offline
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Quasar

(first post into fedoraforums - so I hope I'm in the right place)

I'm currently a ubuntu user on the eee 901 and its pretty solid but like many linux users I like to try out other distros. F10 sounds very interesting especially the work you have done on it for the eees.

Couple of questions.
1. You recommend /boot and / partitions - I have read about the advantages of doing this and because you encrypt / then I understand its essential but its not something I've ever done before with other distros. Does f10 run fine without doing this? and there any penalties to having a separate boot partition?

2. Id be interested to know your rough boot times to the desktop with the std f10 and your lean version on the eee. I think a new system 'plymouth' has been incorporated into the distro. but I think its limited to certain graphic cards at the mo so I assume this isnt much help as yet on the eee?

3. the wikis tell us how to add to a usb stick using software I have not heard of before. up to now i have used unetbootin to do this it seems to work flawlessly in windows but not so reliably in linux for some reason. Is the liveusb creator more reliable for f10?

4. could I test out your lean kernel booting off a stick?


Martin
eee 901 currently ubuntu 8.10, also puppy 4.1 works well.
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  #4  
Old 3rd December 2008, 02:03 PM
Quasar8000 Offline
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Quote:
1. You recommend /boot and / partitions - I have read about the advantages of doing this and because you encrypt / then I understand its essential but its not something I've ever done before with other distros. Does f10 run fine without doing this? and there any penalties to having a separate boot partition?
F10 runs without any problems without the encryption, and it actually speeds up your boot time by a couple of seconds. As for the /boot partition, it doesn't make a difference whether you have it separated or not, I just made it that way in case someone would like to encrypt their / partition. As a side note, I have the /home partition encrypted, not the /, which means you could use the same partitioning scheme I used (and encrypt /home) without a separate /boot partition with no problems.
Quote:
2. Id be interested to know your rough boot times to the desktop with the std f10 and your lean version on the eee. I think a new system 'plymouth' has been incorporated into the distro. but I think its limited to certain graphic cards at the mo so I assume this isnt much help as yet on the eee?
My boot time with the standard F10 kernel was about 1 minute 5 seconds, and it was reduced by 10-15 seconds with the lean kernel. The time was further reduced by about 5 seconds when I was trying it without the encryption (I'd appreciate anyone confirming that since I only tried this when I had F10 Preview installed). As for Plymouth, it works fine on the Eee PC, and you can check this thread out if you want to add a theme to it instead of having the progress bar alone.
Quote:
3. the wikis tell us how to add to a usb stick using software I have not heard of before. up to now i have used unetbootin to do this it seems to work flawlessly in windows but not so reliably in linux for some reason. Is the liveusb creator more reliable for f10?
I tried creating a bootable USB Flash Drive with the livecd-iso-to-disk tool many times and I never faced a problem with it.
Quote:
4. could I test out your lean kernel booting off a stick?
I don't see a reason why not, but it might be a hassle. If you already have F10 installed on the Eee PC, you could install the lean kernel without replacing the standard one (using the instructions I wrote above). That way, you can revert to the standard kernel any time you like should you decide to.

I hope this answers your questions
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  #5  
Old 4th December 2008, 07:48 AM
hotdog Offline
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Age: 36
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A good summary, Quasar8000. It might be worth mentioning here that the wireless drivers are now available in packaged form from the rpmfusion repositories (together with loads more useful software, of course). Just install the kmod-rt2860 package and drivers precompiled for your current kernel will be automatically installed, and each time you update to a new kernel the corresponding kernel modules will be automatically installed for that too. The downside of this approach is that it won't work with a custom kernel, such as your slimmed down one.

I'm just in the process of getting my Eee PC 901 fine tuned with Fedora 10 myself. So far so good, the boot time is noticeable quicker and graphics performance appears much improved compared to Fedora 9. I've adopted a slightly different partitioning scheme, but similar to yours. I find the 4GB primary SSD a bit on the tight side for all of / so have created separate /var and /tmp partitions on the 16GB secondary SSD. This will enable me to fill the 4GB SSD with installed software without worrying about running out of space for logs and important temporary files such as the yum cache (both stored in /var). It also means that the 4GB SSD only gets written to when installing/updating/removing software because all my data files, temporary files and logs are written on the 16GB SSD. This is probably pointless, but the idea of the 4GB SSD as a 'mostly read only' disc appeals to me.

Primary SSD (4GB):
/boot : 76MB (more than big enough, room for 5 kernels)
/ : 3.7GB (the rest of the drive)

Secondary SSD (16GB):
swap : 2GB (equal to my RAM size, just for hibernation)
/tmp : 1GB (probably larger than it really needs to be)
/var : 1GB (not unreasonable, yum can cache several hundred MB of rpms at times)
/home: 11GB (the rest of the drive, encrypted)

SDHC card (16GB):
/media/data : 16GB (formatted ext3, in my /etc/fstab with the options defaults,noatime,user,sync,noauto)
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HTC Hero w/ Android 1.5 (MoDaCo Custom ROM 2.2e)
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  #6  
Old 4th December 2008, 08:18 PM
tonypmartin Offline
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Join Date: Jul 2005
Posts: 65
F10 on eeepc 900

I have installed F10 onto an external eeepc 8GB SDHC card. Seems to be working well. Installed from dvd using a usb dvd drive with no probs. Have been previously using F9 so F10 looks good.

Do have a wireless issue though. Connects, but very slow eg. when doing yum updates. Getting socket errors and timeouts. I am going to try disabling ipv6 to ee if that helps. eth works fine. If anyone has any info it would be welcome.

Tonypm
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  #7  
Old 4th December 2008, 10:48 PM
Magnus G Offline
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Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Sweden
Posts: 4
I tried your modified kernel and it definitely made the 901 boot faster, brilliant!
Care to share the secrets on what you excluded in case anyone wants to roll their own?

As for the partitioning scheme might I suggest a third option?
Being old school (i.e. old) I don’t see any reason to add the extra layer of complexity that LVM brings to the 901 (since the disks are so different), so I did away with LVM and the /boot-partition (since it is not needed if you are not using LVM, encrypted root-disk or similar) and made the entire primary SDD one single root-partition. But since F10 is “rather bloated" 4GB isn’t really enough, so I dedicated 4GB of the (slower) secondary SSD for the “least important” parts, (i.e. /usr/share) and the remaining 12GB for /home (and the unmentionable OS).

Primary SSD(4GB):
/ : all available space (note you have to delete all LVMs that the installer suggests first).

Secondary SSD(16GB):
/usr/share : 4GB
/home : 8 – 12 GB


But I’m having trouble with “suspend to ram” though.
I’m using the RPMfusion version (made my own from the srpm to match Quasar8000:s kernel) and when I return from suspension the wireless device fails with:
ERROR!!! BBP read R3=0xffffffff fail
ERROR!!! BBP write R3=0xffffffff fail
Etc,
Etc,

Anyone else having trouble with the wireless device after returning from suspend to ram?
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  #8  
Old 5th December 2008, 02:14 AM
hotdog Offline
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Location: Sydney, Australia
Age: 36
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Good idea on shifting /usr/share onto the secondary SSD Magnus, now I wish I'd done it as my primary is already nearly full despite my having /var and /tmp on the secondary. /usr/share mostly contains software documentation, typically, doesn't it? There's 1.6GB in mine already and I could have done with that space to give more room for the software itself (/usr/bin and /usr/lib) on the primary.

It seems a shame to wipe everything and repartition now just as I've got Fedora 10 installed and running but I suppose it's best to do it soon before I've spent too much time customising and fine tuning everything and copying all my data. No time at the moment, but perhaps over the weekend...

Of course I could just avoid all these difficult decisions by going back to the partitioning scheme I used for Fedora 9 (small /boot on the primary and swap on the secondary, all the rest of both disks used for an LVM volume group with 10GB / and 9GB /home logical volumes) but I think I was incurring a significant performance penalty due to the LVM overhead (very small, probably) and having software using the slower secondary SSD.
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HTC Hero w/ Android 1.5 (MoDaCo Custom ROM 2.2e)
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  #9  
Old 5th December 2008, 03:29 AM
hotdog Offline
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Age: 36
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OK, leaving aside pondering on partitioning schemes for a moment it might be useful to include in this howto guide thread my experiences with using external monitors in a dual head setup with Fedora 10 on the Eee PC 901.

The default for the Fedora 10 is to not to have an xorg.conf file and let X set everything up automatically on startup. This works well for the most part, but as I describe in this post there are some problems if you want to use an external monitor. I've created a xorg.conf file, which I've listed and explained in this post. Just copy the contents to /etc/X11/xorg.conf and you'll have more sensible behaviour on boot and you'll be able to 'hotplug' external monitors without restarting X. You'll still need to use xrandr to enable/disable hotplugged external displays though (as I describe in this post) because the Gnome display preferences tool doesn't work properly (at least with our hardware).

More details on how this all works here

I hope this helps a few people.
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  #10  
Old 8th December 2008, 07:12 AM
eviltabbycat Offline
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I've installed F10 on my EEE-PC 1000H, installed the rt driver from rpmfusion & everything works perfectly except when it comes out of suspend the wireless is off & will not turn back on without a reboot. Can anyone offer any pointers to get this one item fixed up ?

Edit: didn't read Magnus G 's last post, yeah I also have that problem :-(

Last edited by eviltabbycat; 8th December 2008 at 07:14 AM.
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  #11  
Old 9th December 2008, 12:05 AM
Quasar8000 Offline
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I'm not sure if those network and suspend issues are caused by the rpmfusion RT2860 driver or something else, but I'm not using this driver, and the only problem I had when coming back from suspend was that the NetworkManager didn't seem to detect any networks. The problem was solved with a simple NetworkManager restart:
Code:
service NetworkManager restart
Quote:
Care to share the secrets on what you excluded in case anyone wants to roll their own?
Certainly, you can find the my kernel config file here. It's still a work in progress, but it will get you the same kernel I make if you use it. As for the Bluetooth support, you have to make a couple of minor modifications to the eeepc-laptop driver in order to enable it, and I'm in the process of making a patch so that anyone can apply them.

An update on what's happening these days: I'm working on a new kernel based on 2.6.28-rc7. The kernel will be lean, and will include some major updates. I'm currently testing the kernel and might be releasing it sometime next week
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  #12  
Old 9th December 2008, 01:12 AM
hotdog Offline
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I like the sound of your 2.6.28 custom kernel Quasar, I'm keen to get my hands on the Elantech touchpad driver so I can use all the Synaptics driver goodies (like the automatic touchpad tap disable while typing daemon). Incidentally, how long does an Eee PC typically take to compile a (slimmed down) kernel? It's been years since I compiled one and it always took ages, it'd be interesting to hear how a modern 'low performance' machine compares.

An aside on the rt2860 wireless drivers, there are three main ways you can currently install these:

1) Download the source from the Ralink webpage and compile and install following Quasar's instruction above. You will need to manually recompile and reinstall the drivers each time you install a new kernel.

2) Install the kmod-rt2860 package from RPM Fusion. This will automatically install a precompiled driver for your current kernel. When you install a new kernel the corresponding precompiled kernel module (kmod) package will also be installed. The downside is that this will only work for kernels that the package maintainers compile for, i.e. stock Fedora kernels.

3) Install the akmod-rt2860 package from RPM Fusion. This package is even more cunning that the kmod one. When you have this installed it will look for a precompiled kmod package for your kernel but if it can't find one it will instead automatically compile and install one from the source code. Each time you install a new kernel it will do the same. This should work for any kernel, one way or another. More on akmods here.

I've decided that Magnus G's partitioning scheme (or a slight variant with a swap partition) is the best way to go, at least for me who's attempting to use the Eee PC as my main machine. I've reinstalled with the following:

Primary SSD (4GB):
/ : 4GB (the whole drive)

Secondary SSD (16GB):
swap : 2GB (equal to my RAM size, needed for hibernation)
/usr/share : 4GB
/home: 10GB (the rest of the drive, encrypted)

Now after a fresh install the / and /usr/share partitions are about half full, leaving me plenty of room to add more software later and for the yum cache and other temporary files. Also all the most frequently read and most frequently written to system files are on the higher performance primary SSD, only my user files, the system documentation and the hibernation file go on the slower secondary drive.
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  #13  
Old 9th December 2008, 08:10 AM
hotdog Offline
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I have the same problem with the wireless failing after resume from a suspend to RAM. I've installed the kernel module from RPM Fusion via the akmod route, and I'm currently using the standard Fedora 10 kernel. The only person who says they don't have this problem so far is Quasar8000 who's the only person not to use a package from RPM Fusion (though he is also using experimental kernels...). I'm going to try an install from Ralink's source code tarball and see if I still get the same failure. Someone has opened a bug on this in RPM Fusion's bugzilla, it would useful to find out whether the problem stems from Ralink or from the packaging done by RPM Fusion.

I have other problems with resume from suspend, but it seems I'm the only one... If I suspend with compiz (i.e. Desktop Effects) enabled then my laptop will hang when I try to resume, but it works OK if compiz is off. Anyone else tried suspend to RAM with compiz on? I didn't have this problem with Fedora 9.
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  #14  
Old 9th December 2008, 08:26 AM
Quasar8000 Offline
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Quote:
I'm keen to get my hands on the Elantech touchpad driver so I can use all the Synaptics driver goodies
Unfortunately, the Elantech driver is one of the things that are causing some problems when installed, so I'm not sure whether I'll include it in this version or not, but I'm trying my best to sort out those issues.
Quote:
Incidentally, how long does an Eee PC typically take to compile a (slimmed down) kernel?
It takes roughly about 2-2.5 hours, but I only tried using the Eee to compile the kernel a couple of times. These days I compile the kernel on my desktop then move it to the Eee for testing. It's a huge time-saver, and, presumably, does not reduce the Eee's SSD life because of all the heavy read/write operations that occur when building a kernel.

I think it would be interesting to see the problems faced by people with different RT2860 driver/compiz configurations. It would definitely help solve the issues at hand.
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  #15  
Old 11th December 2008, 12:32 AM
hotdog Offline
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A couple more notes:

Compiz ('Desktop Effects')

I've found that if I enable compiz (by turning on 'Desktop Effects') then my Eee will hang when I try to resume from a suspend to RAM. This doesn't happen if compiz not used. The Redhat bugzilla has some details of problems experienced with a number of different Intel integrated graphics chipsets when compiz is used, such as hangs on resume from suspend or switching virtual terminals. It's being worked on, and a few days ago there was an update to xorg-x11-drv-i810 which is supposed to address some of these issues. I haven't tested whether it's fixed the problem for the Eee PC yet.

Another issue with compiz is that by default it doesn't allow you to move a window so that the title bar is off the top of the screen, which is very useful when you're confronted with a dialog box which is more than 600 pixels tall... Quasar posted a fix in his Fedora 9 on Eee PC thread, you just need to type
Code:
gconftool-2 --set /apps/compiz/plugins/move/allscreens/options/constrain_y --type bool 0
in a terminal.

Microphone

With the latest Fedora 10 kernel (2.6.27.7-134) the built in stereo microphone now works. After making sure it wasn't muted in Volume Control or the Pulse Audio Volume control I was able to record from it using Sound Recorder. I haven't tried Skype yet, though.
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