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-   -   Fedora's performance in All-in-One machines? (http://forums.fedoraforum.org/showthread.php?t=276772)

joe.pelayo 22nd February 2012 06:05 AM

Fedora's performance in All-in-One machines?
 
Hello everybody.

There exists the possibility that I purchase a new machine soon, and mainly due to space constraints I might be choosing an All-in-One machine. Since I don't plan to blow out a lot of money I have already ruled out a Mac, but I realized some vendors offer reasonable PC machines in that form-factor.

Of course I would be interested in dual-booting the surely-to-be-included Windows with Fedora (16), and would like to know if anyone here have already have problems with said machines from a Linux perspective.

Are there any tips? Models to avoid? What can I expect of Linux in such a device?

Thanks,
Joe.

joe.pelayo 22nd February 2012 07:51 PM

Re: Fedora's performance in All-in-One machines?
 
Come on, some one must have done this before.

Finalzone 22nd February 2012 10:03 PM

Re: Fedora's performance in All-in-One machines?
 
Bring a LiveCD with you and test it on your all-in-one machine. =)

sea 22nd February 2012 10:34 PM

Re: Fedora's performance in All-in-One machines?
 
Just as another input, you need to value the info yourself.
My impression is this, running an Apple device usualy interferences with linux, but i recall to have read 1 article where everything worked well. Dont recall when or which device, as i dont use Mac.

On the other hand, i find it quiete interesting that you dont want to pay too much, but aim to buy a mac. As according to my impression you get alot better hardware for the same price just if its not a mac.. (or did i misunderstod you?)

Finalzone's suggestion is the best idea.

Another feedback, i feel like Samsung would be a better choice in a matter of linux compatiblity (in my case WiFi).
But Toshiba's a good choice in a matter of performance.

EDIT:
I have both device boot time (systemd-analyze) below 20 seconds. Both running apache, mysql and noip, but neither cups, sendmail nor fedora*.services as i dont have my mobile devies running neither raid nor lvm.

PS Hint: If you have the option, get SSD!

joe.pelayo 23rd February 2012 03:44 AM

Re: Fedora's performance in All-in-One machines?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by sea (Post 1557139)
Just as another input, you need to value the info yourself.
My impression is this, running an Apple device usualy interferences with linux, but i recall to have read 1 article where everything worked well. Dont recall when or which device, as i dont use Mac.

On the other hand, i find it quiete interesting that you dont want to pay too much, but aim to buy a mac. As according to my impression you get alot better hardware for the same price just if its not a mac.. (or did i misunderstod you?)

Finalzone's suggestion is the best idea.

Another feedback, i feel like Samsung would be a better choice in a matter of linux compatiblity (in my case WiFi).
But Toshiba's a good choice in a matter of performance.

EDIT:
I have both device boot time (systemd-analyze) below 20 seconds. Both running apache, mysql and noip, but neither cups, sendmail nor fedora*.services as i dont have my mobile devies running neither raid nor lvm.

PS Hint: If you have the option, get SSD!

Hi sea,

On the contrary, I want to avoid Apple, but I do want a device with a similar form-factor. As a matter of fact I have at my disposal at work two Macs and I don't particularly like the OS (although I find it better than Windows of course).

I always carry with me a liveUSB, I guess that using it will my strategy to make a good purchase.
Thanks,
Joe.

bbfuller 23rd February 2012 11:14 AM

Re: Fedora's performance in All-in-One machines?
 
I set one of these up for a friend the other week. Unfortunately, he's not at all interested in Linux so I can only give you a partial report on it.

However, from my point of view, it was a bit like playing with a large, rigid format laptop.

I sincerely doubt that there are any chipsets made especially for the form factor in the same way that there are rarely chipsets made for laptops that aren't inherited from desktop/tower machines. I'd possibly exclude a couple of netbook chipsets from that statement, but they seem to be pretty much supported by Linux in any event.

The thing about the all-in-one though is that it is more like a laptop in that repairing/replacing simple components is likely to be more of a chore than on a bigger format and some things like the motherboard are likely to be designed to fit so possibly no easy route to replacement if you are unlucky.

That said, lots of people buy laptops and never worry or have the problem and these electronic devices are really very reliable.

You may find in a new machine like that, that you will have more difficulty with peripheral chipsets like wireless until Linux catches up, but again, that can be a problem with new laptops.

The only thing I couldn't make much sense of was the touch screen, and neither could my friend, even though he had spent quite a bit extra to acquire the facility as all the "all-in-ones" we could see had one, he could easily have got a tower and comparable size non-touch monitor for quite a bit less. It did seem a bit pointless making large waving movements with my arm over a 24", nearly vertical, screen when I could achieve the same effect with small mouse movements.

Still, opinions will vary and I'm quite sure:confused: that the developers who design the new interfaces have taken all that into consideration.

sea 23rd February 2012 12:23 PM

Re: Fedora's performance in All-in-One machines?
 
What is this all-on-one device in your thoughts?
At first (2010) i bought the toshiba laptop, and thought i'll be taking with me to code n' stuff in the train or while waiting on appointments.
While the big screen 17.3" is easy on the eyes, the device itself is not very handy and the battery lasts only for 2.5 hours.
Later (2011) i had bought a small netbook, which takes forever to compile GCC or Binutils, but its weigth is only about 1 kg, and the battery lasts for 5-6 hours.

If you're going to play newer games, i would consider Alienware as a great performer, but the prices are just blasting 'common sense', though the hardware either ;)
If you dont play much, any device with intel and realtek chipsets should suffice and give you good performance on low cost and less troubles.

joe.pelayo 23rd February 2012 01:31 PM

Re: Fedora's performance in All-in-One machines?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by sea (Post 1557283)
What is this all-on-one device in your thoughts?
At first (2010) i bought the toshiba laptop, and thought i'll be taking with me to code n' stuff in the train or while waiting on appointments.
While the big screen 17.3" is easy on the eyes, the device itself is not very handy and the battery lasts only for 2.5 hours.
Later (2011) i had bought a small netbook, which takes forever to compile GCC or Binutils, but its weigth is only about 1 kg, and the battery lasts for 5-6 hours.

If you're going to play newer games, i would consider Alienware as a great performer, but the prices are just blasting 'common sense', though the hardware either ;)
If you dont play much, any device with intel and realtek chipsets should suffice and give you good performance on low cost and less troubles.

This is one of the guys I am considering, although there are several others.

What I am looking for here is to optimize my desk space, along with several other considerations:
  • I am not looking for a performance monster, however I don't want to aim as slow as an Atom processor.
  • Except for my netbook, I prefer my machines to be AMD powered, so that makes my choice simpler.
  • A big screen is important since this will be kind of a multimedia center for me (as well as for visualization purposes; most of the work I do is run on external supercomputers); also a big HDD is desirable.

Thanks,
Joe.

sea 23rd February 2012 02:05 PM

Re: Fedora's performance in All-in-One machines?
 
Looks good, and as i see in your signature you have experience with an ATI gpu with linux.
Otherwise i would had suggest to look for an nvidia, as my impression from this forum is, that nvidia is better supported by foss drivers than ati ones.

However, i couldnt find information about the e-350 amd chip, regarding how many cores, better to say, threads it is offering.
The 'best' compareable value i had found is this:
http://www.cpubenchmark.net/cpu_look...?cpu=AMD+E-350

Hope this helps

DBelton 23rd February 2012 05:33 PM

Re: Fedora's performance in All-in-One machines?
 
well, you are taking chances with just about all of the All-In-One machines.

My brother works on the hardware maintenance side of things, and he has had numerous failures in the All-In-One machines, sometimes within a day after they are installed.

In the past year or so, his calls on the all-in-ones have skyrocketed (he replaces about 3 per week now, and repairs about twice that many) and his company will no longer write a new service contract on any of them.

He was telling me the biggest issue is heat buildup, and most of them have crappy fans to start with. (He keeps a case of fans for the Lenovo's in his truck, it's so common a replacement part for him)

Finalzone 23rd February 2012 08:25 PM

Re: Fedora's performance in All-in-One machines?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by sea (Post 1557295)
However, i couldnt find information about the e-350 amd chip, regarding how many cores, better to say, threads it is offering.
The 'best' compareable value i had found is this:
http://www.cpubenchmark.net/cpu_look...?cpu=AMD+E-350

Hope this helps

AMD E-350 is a APU Zacate featuring 1.6GHZ dual-core cpu and Radeon 6310 found on several laptop (in my case Toshiba Satellite C650D). It is the first generation of APU. The battery consumption varies from 3-4 hours depending of the usage despite a known issue of optimization in Linux kernel. The time of compilation is decent.
That chip can be a problem for a non-updated Fedora 15 and less due to kernel issue. The latest stable release is the best.
Multimedia is excellent, video editing time is decent. Open source radeon driver is remarkable Gnome-shell runs fine. I brought that laptop for less than CAD 400.00 including memory upgrade to 4GB considering the price and performance ratio.

Should you want a E-350 laptop, I suggest Toshibla Satellite C650D that includes DVD drive. HP Pavilion dm1 first, Lenovo ThinkPad X120e are decent but don't include a optical drive.

joe.pelayo 24th February 2012 12:30 AM

Re: Fedora's performance in All-in-One machines?
 
Thanks for your responses guys!

I'll try to address all the ideas:

Yes, it's been a while since I started using AMD (ATI) GPUs, since 2006 to be precise and although support was crappy back then, right now the FOSS ATI driver absolutely rocks (in both machines with such type of device at least). On the other hand, I can always get good performance out of the only Nvidia GPU I have by installing the proprietary driver, perhaps that is no longer the case. Despite the fact I'd like to do some CUDA programming on NVIDIA GPUs, right now I don't have the time and already have at my disposal a machine for that purpose; besides I believe that my best bet performance-wise is to have the whole AMD package (CPU+GPU) rather than mix AMD with NVIDIA.

I will take very much in consideration the experience of DBelton's brother with All-In-Ones: heat issues are logical to occur to such devices. It would be interesting to see statistics about that failure-rate: which processors are involved in most involved machines? Some months ago I installed F15 on a friend's brand new Acer laptop sporting an also just released AMD C-50 "APU", I believe also from the "Zacate" family with the GPU embedded; I found it very interesting that the machine made practically no noise (as if powered off; just the very occasional HDD spin) nor did it warm up, so am tempted to believe that the "Zacate" family of AMD processor is ideal for an All-In-One. It's also interesting to know that Lenovo All-In-Ones in particular are problematic, but to be honest I had already dismissed them because all the models I saw had screens with the "standard" resolution of 1366x768 (which is not an improvement over my laptop's screen).

For what I see in the benchmark provided for the E350, aside from a possible improvement in performance (GPU wise), I wouldn't see much difference with my current laptop, in fact, the rating puts it even slower than my older one (2006), which does not precisely justify my buying of a new laptop (maybe a subnotebook, but still it would be a prerequisite that this machine dies or something). I might be more tempted by another type of processor for a new laptop: a Phenom II, or an AMD A8, but that might slip out of my budget.

Thanks,
Joe.


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