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WernerCD
5th March 2009, 06:39 PM
I was just wondering, as I didn't really see this anywhere I could find...

1) I have Fedora 10 on a USB atm. My original LiveUSB was Fedora 9. After the inital install, I did a system update, and iirc it gave alot of errors.

So my question... on a LiveUSB, do you update? Do you just update normally (And I just had a bad day) or is there a special way to run updates?

2) I'm learning heaps and heaps about Linux. My teacher can still walk circles around me, but we are both a little un-learned about installing and running linux via USB. All of the solutions I see, are LiveCDs ported to USB via various methods.

Is it possible to actually install Linux, fedora or otherwise, to USB? Without the limitations of LiveUSB?

Thanks
Chris

blittle
5th March 2009, 11:41 PM
yeah it's possible to do that (I'm not familiar with how) but I know that people are running fedora on CF cards on the XO's

I'm personally having some trouble with a kingston traveller usb device not booting :(

TarrasQ
12th March 2009, 12:02 AM
I have experimented a little how to install Fedora on a USB stick. It worked quite well by installing normally to the drive on the stick just as to a hard drive.

I had trouble booting it and I don't remember exactly what I had to do to go around it. I think I had to change grub.conf to boot from /dev/<usbdevice> instead of the serial number thingy. That brought the issue that the device changes between ports and computers, thus the stick could be booted only on certain computers or to give manual boot commands to grub to make it boot on others.

beerfilledschu
18th March 2009, 12:53 AM
WernerCD wanted to help answer your first question. I've been have problems updating my Fedora 10 live USB stick too. Just found a posting on another site stating that persistence drives do not support new kernels. That being said you need to be selective in updating Live USB sticks.

TheeJoey
18th March 2009, 04:57 AM
I was just wondering, as I didn't really see this anywhere I could find...

1) I have Fedora 10 on a USB atm. My original LiveUSB was Fedora 9. After the inital install, I did a system update, and iirc it gave alot of errors.

So my question... on a LiveUSB, do you update? Do you just update normally (And I just had a bad day) or is there a special way to run updates?

2) I'm learning heaps and heaps about Linux. My teacher can still walk circles around me, but we are both a little un-learned about installing and running linux via USB. All of the solutions I see, are LiveCDs ported to USB via various methods.

Is it possible to actually install Linux, fedora or otherwise, to USB? Without the limitations of LiveUSB?

Thanks
Chris

Did you install 9 and then 10 on top of it? Or a clean install of both, one after the other? Because if you did one then another on top of it, you're doubling up on space. Its best to do a clean installation of a live distro like Fed10 - it seems. It has to do with the advantages of using a live distro on a USB drive.

There are some big reasons for installing a live version on a usb stick, as opposed to a normal version. First, for a normal install you got the constant writing and re-writing to the drive that would be fine for a normal hard-drive, but would be murder on a usb stick - it would be worn out very soon. Live distros can do this too, though most seem not to. Fed10 duznt - it stores-in-ram and then writes everything at the end of a session. Second, you got the advantage of a basic system with a sort of layer of extras over the core basics. You install the core basics in the live USB and then whatever you install after that while using the USB is sort of tacked on whenever you log in - its saved separately on the same drive. This seems to make it possible to revert back to the original, though I haven't tried that yet. I just hear people talking in that way .. yesterday .. maybe the day before.

Anyway, I've been having similar problems. I think the makers of Fed10 live decided to restrict a whole lot of things to make it work properly on more systems. After all, it really is only a demo version at this stage, and that's what the boys at Fedora seem to be saying too - try it out using this live distro, and then if you like it install it. Heck there's even an icon on the desktop specifically to install it on an internal drive. Basically, if you want linux you'll install it on your desktop.

Having said that, you are SUPPOSED to be able to install software on Fed10live, but it doesn't allow full access, which is probably required because otherwise the OS might install something with preferences, and then install a newer version with other preferences. That is, if the operating system is responsible for adding the layer of persistence on top of the liveDistro.

Hope that helps. At least a little. :)

TheeJoey
18th March 2009, 08:40 AM
Ive emailed the guy who makes the live distro and asked about what to do about installing futher software. If I get anything interesting I'll fill you guys in.

Here's hoping.

TheeJoey
18th March 2009, 11:07 AM
a couple of updates

the command:

su -

will gain you root privileges. I did it just before I opened fedora.repo in the yum.repo.d directory. I opened this file as follows:

gedit fedora.repo

If you do this outside of the same terminal window I suspect that this will not work. It did't work with me on maybe a couple of attempts.

I edited the baseurl and changed it to the location of the mounted iso image. (It wasn't the location yet, but I would mount the iso image into that specific directory, and lo and behold I would have access to the repository - hopefully)

baseurl=file:///mnt/fedora10dist64bitfull

I mounted the iso image using the command

mount -t iso9660 -o loop fedora-10-x86_64-DVD.iso /mnt/10dist64bitfull
[spacing at two visible spaces per actual space to make this clearer]

I was in the directory that contained the iso image when I entered this command.

The result is this - As I open the Package Manager I don't get an instant response of a problem with a repository list of some sort. It takes its time. This can only mean that the change of baseurl locations was effective. It was now looking somewhere else, somewhere where there was actually something to look at.

Next, I hit the All Packages tab and got the same response as I would at the beginning, that "no package cache is available", and after digging a little deeper I find a request to rebuild the repomd.xml.

That assumes that I have the ability. First I gotta know what this thing is. So I look.

Xml files are like html - they are filled with tags. They do something really really different, but they are basically both script formats. I search around for something that can explain what in heck this thing is, and I find a reference to a linux.duke.edu. Something like that.

This site is linked in relation to metadata - specifically, within the two references that I found are contained ip addresses to repository, and rpm.

Now, the repomd.xml does not seem to be at fault. Package Manager couldn't even find it. But because the manager took its time and didn't return an error so quickly meant that it had found something familiar - hopefully. Also, the fact that repomd.xml contained references to external sources makes it likely that there are references elsewhere which require verification of some sort before that xml is even searched for. The thing is maybe a few kilobytes long, whidh could mean that it is a requirement for it to be downloaded before anything else is done.

I say that because I've been searching a little and found that this file can be associated with package verification, and sometimes encryption is used to secure this verification - apparently.

At this point two things come to mind - the data that I seek to make this work offline could be external and internet based, and second, I'm kinda getting a little miffed by all this - why does the effort of updating software need to be linked to an offline site? Why must it be mandatory?

Of course, knowing how these projects are, I'm almost completely certain that there is a reasonable explanation. Also, I don't believe in patience - I want it now. That's probably adding to my current miffed state.

Oh well, as it stands this is what I need:

a way to rewrite repository information while not changing too many things - I just need a couple of location-changes, or
some information regarding over-rides, which don't exist for Package Manager at this time, it seems.

barf
22nd March 2009, 09:25 PM
If you want to install new packages and update your USB system just install the RPMfusion repos.
Google 'rpm fusion'

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