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usenix
17th May 2004, 02:38 PM
does anybody know why fedora core 2 was called 'tettnang'? all i can associate with this name is a very small town in southern germany (i lived there a long time ago) and a kind of hops which is cultivated in this area. why tettnang??? :confused:

harlekin
17th May 2004, 02:54 PM
good question.

as all red-hat releases got names related 2 the release before but not related 2 the even-before one i guess they try the same here. so u got yarrow and tettnang what have both in common. when i (located in germany) google for tettnang i reallly only got everything ( it seems even the public toilets of tettnang have there own homepage) bout the city in germany. But it seems Yarrow is somehow related 2 the city of tettnang (yarrow got imported 2 the usa from europe (maybe from tettnang?) )

what will be the name 4 fedora core 3?

kzip
17th May 2004, 03:09 PM
Yarrow is a spice and Tettnang is a type of hop - both are used (or were used) in beer brewing so perhaps that's the link.

Pegasus
17th May 2004, 03:10 PM
These codenames are combined with hops...

"Tettnang is an aroma-type cultivar which originated in the Tettnang hop growing area of Germany as a land-race hop. It is grown in the U.S.A. in Oregon and Washington State. "

EDIT: kzip was faster :D

Ug
17th May 2004, 03:19 PM
Kzip?

Pegasus
17th May 2004, 03:29 PM
kzip, not Kzip. :D

usenix
17th May 2004, 03:30 PM
i imagine they didn't find these codenames while drinking water or coke - anyway, it doesn't matter so long as they don't call it budweiser or becks :)

Pegasus
17th May 2004, 03:32 PM
sometimes you must be drunken to create useful things ...

harlekin
17th May 2004, 03:51 PM
i would like it, when they would call fedora 3 budweiser
(okay im not in usa, so i would rather have in mind the real beer from chechia :D )
it sounds more used 2 me if i say im allready looking forward to the new budweiser ;)

ilja
17th May 2004, 05:15 PM
I was busy with managing my budweiser the whole night :D

foolish
17th May 2004, 05:34 PM
Here's what I've gathered so far:

Red Hat and Fedora code names are always somehow connected, even though the connection can be very hard to find.

Fedora Core 1 was called yarrow. Yarrow is a plant, which I think sometimes is used in brewing of various drinks, among them beer.

Tettnang is a plant too, a hop, used in brewing of beer among other things. So that's your connection.

(Tettnang is also an area in Germany, I would'nt be suprised if Core 3s codename somehow will be connected to this area)

Ug
17th May 2004, 06:06 PM
Foolish: see further up the thread. ;)

micha
17th May 2004, 06:47 PM
Originally posted by usenix
i imagine they didn't find these codenames while drinking water or coke - anyway, it doesn't matter so long as they don't call it budweiser or becks :) Come on, Beck's is not that bad (as a beer, not as a name) !

foolish
17th May 2004, 07:18 PM
Let's try to figure out the connection between these: valhalla - psyche - shrike

Ug
17th May 2004, 07:58 PM
Psyche - Shrike is that something paranormal?

kzip
17th May 2004, 08:20 PM
Originally posted by foolish
Let's try to figure out the connection between these: valhalla - psyche - shrike

Psyche - Greek Godess of the Soul.
Valhalla - Norse mythology of the Afterlife.
Shrike - A Magpie is of the Shrike family and often associated with Hel, daughter of Loki who would guide lost souls.

I'm really not up on Norse/Greek mythology so someone else might be able to spot a better pattern, but I think that's basically it.

mattm
17th May 2004, 09:24 PM
and valhalla is a viking afterlife kingdom. And/or god. Can't really remember.

repeater75
18th May 2004, 12:09 AM
From http://fedora.redhat.com/about/history/

Naming convention

Starting with Picasso, Red Hat has given releases of Red Hat Linux code names. (These names are included in the /etc/redhat-release file, with the version number.) The code names follow a strict pattern at least, we have tried to make them follow a strict pattern. Name n and n+1 must share an is-a (not a has-a) relationship, but n and n+2 must not share an is-a relationship. (Extra credit for finding the small mistakes we made; we are now aware that we have at least one case where n and n+2 share an is-a relationship. The best-laid plans of mice and men gang aft a-gley.) Sometimes the name has changed from one beta release to another; more often it has not. There is no subtle message encoded in whether the name changes from one beta release to the next. Red Hat Enterprise Linux releases have not had code names; only release names which have also been used in place of code names.

In the past few years, there have also been a set of release names applied to each release by product management; these names are per formal release, where the beta has the same name as the follow-on product. Red Hat has not formally published these names, but several of them have become common knowledge anyway. These names have been geographical; they were originally the birthplaces of various members of the product management team, but those ran out and we had to find other geographical names.

Red Hat Enterprise Linux have only release names, no code names. Fedora Core will have only code names, not release names, except that we had already chosen the name "Cambridge" as a release name for the project that became Fedora Core 1.

Neither set of names has a long queue of new names already chosen and waiting for it. Therefore, as common practice, we use C syntax to refer to future releases. For example, the release code-named "Shrike" has the release name "Gin Gin"; the next release we informally referred to as "Gin Gin++" until we chose the release name "Cambridge."

The names are interesting, for sure. I like that debian uses names from Toy Story, my son's favorite movie.

Jman
18th May 2004, 01:04 AM
Seems like the goal is to pick some obscure topic and then stay with the naming scheme. As a bonus you get a riddle: what do these things have in common?

By tradition, I think code names should be obscure.

Name n and n+1 must share an is-a (not a has-a) relationship, but n and n+2 must not share an is-a relationship. You can tell they're programmers.

repeater75
18th May 2004, 01:27 AM
Jman...it just doesn't get much geekier than linux programmers. Okay, maybe my Uncle Dave doing his thing in the Fortran days isn't as sexy as linux...but let's face it!!!!

There is definitely a "you're just not cool enough to be in our joke" nomenclature happening here.