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View Full Version : could somone give m e a simple walkthrew on how to install an rpm and then run


mrpervie
28th November 2006, 04:19 AM
new to fedora and im not quite sure how the file system works nor do i know what program to open rpms with i know u can install in your console by typing rpm -i <path> but then how do u set an icon and/or run the program
if it helps im trying to install opera.rpm if you need additional information about my configuration just let me know what u need to know id like to get this done as easy and quick as possible thanks guys :)

mrpervie
28th November 2006, 04:20 AM
oh and if i just double click it it wants me to open it with a program but im not sure what i want to open it with so quit tellin me to double click =p

u-noneinc-s
28th November 2006, 04:47 AM
Since you mentioned opera.rpm... once you install it, you can forget about rpm. You don't open rpms after you install them. The program name will simply be opera. You should be able to find it in the menu. opera should be under internet (though I'm not familiar with gnome menu setup), or just type opera in a terminal and opera should start.
If you want a desktop icon, rightclick on the desktop and click new and choose link to application. or something similar. Then just fill in the blanks. You may need to know the path to the app. In most cases it will be /usr/bin/application-name, but there should be a browse button to link it for you.

nick.stumpos
28th November 2006, 04:51 AM
you should be able to right click on the desktop and create a launcher, then fill in the aunch command that you would use in a terminal, i believe for orpera it is just opera, to be able to double click rpms and have them install right click on the rpm go to properties then opens with, then add then custom, and type system-install-packages

mrpervie
28th November 2006, 05:05 AM
awsome im starten to get the hang of this....

u-noneinc-s
28th November 2006, 05:14 AM
Isn't it just kewel?

mrpervie
28th November 2006, 05:41 AM
i love this u have no idea...time to move on to bigger and better things....ok now about cedega lol.....how do i install somthing thats not an rpm? like tgz...thats like linux archive or zipped orsomthing?

mrpervie
28th November 2006, 05:45 AM
k i downloaded it to /root/downloads/transgamming.Cedega i just want wine tho im not tryin to get any games started dont worry =P.....ok in there theres ,cedega-engine-5.2-local-update.i386.cpkg,cedega-small-5.2-1.i386.rpm...oh chit i guess the rpm is in here LOL!

u-noneinc-s
28th November 2006, 05:45 AM
Nickisgod1, you are much better at "communicating" this stuff so if you don't mind, take it away.

fozner
28th November 2006, 05:47 AM
If you have Fedora, it is better to fetch your rpms using yum. That way they will download any additional dependencies you might need.

For example, to install the game, torcs:

su
yum install torcs
exit

Now you can run it by typing torcs.

What most folks don't know is many packages also install other runnable software.
To find out what came with torcs, take a look at the rpm package with a command like:
rpm -q --filesbypkg torcs | grep /bin

torcs /usr/bin/accc
torcs /usr/bin/nfs2ac
torcs /usr/bin/nfsperf
torcs /usr/bin/texmapper
torcs /usr/bin/torcs
torcs /usr/bin/trackgen

If you don't like messing around at the command line, install yumex. It's a graphical front-end to yum.

References:
man yum
man rpm
man grep
man yumex

u-noneinc-s
28th November 2006, 06:03 AM
This could not be more true, but sometimes you have to compile (or build your own rpm) so it's something everone should know. So here goes.
For a .tgz or .tar.gz, first unpack withtar zxvf filename.tar.gz then cd to the newly created dir and look for INSTALL and README and read them. Generall the installation will be 3 or 4 steps first is ./configure. If that completes without errors, next is make, if that completes witout errors you can run the program from that dir to check it out. If you are happy with it as root do make install. make install is not necessary if you just want to run the app locally (from it's own dir). Not all .tar.gz files are of the compile type. that's why you need to look for INSTALL or README. some are .sh or .bin and need to be made executable [CODE]chmod +x filename.bin (or .sh) nd then run with ./filename (I'm not 100% sure on the .bin)

For .tar.bz, it's basically the same but instead of tar zxvf it's tar jxvf

But as fozner said, always yum whenever possible. "Tarballs" will not get updated through yum and need to be managed by you. They need to be updated by you and need to be removed by you so it's also a good idea to keep the original "unpacked" dir around for uninstalling (if there is a make uninstall in the dir).

EDIT: The chmod command probably needs to be chmod u+x filename and there is also a number system for chmod but I don't use it enough to be familiar. I'll read it and remember the convention for a couple of days, then it's gone;)

nick.stumpos
28th November 2006, 06:31 AM
This could not be more true, but sometimes you have to compile (or build your own rpm) so it's something everone should know. So here goes.
For a .tgz or .tar.gz, first unpack withtar zxvf filename.tar.gz then cd to the newly created dir and look for INSTALL and README and read them. Generall the installation will be 3 or 4 steps first is ./configure. If that completes without errors, next is make, if that completes witout errors you can run the program from that dir to check it out. If you are happy with it as root do make install. make install is not necessary if you just want to run the app locally (from it's own dir). Not all .tar.gz files are of the compile type. that's why you need to look for INSTALL or README. some are .sh or .bin and need to be made executable [CODE]chmod +x filename.bin (or .sh) nd then run with ./filename (I'm not 100% sure on the .bin)

For .tar.bz, it's basically the same but instead of tar zxvf it's tar jxvf

But as fozner said, always yum whenever possible. "Tarballs" will not get updated through yum and need to be managed by you. They need to be updated by you and need to be removed by you so it's also a good idea to keep the original "unpacked" dir around for uninstalling (if there is a make uninstall in the dir).

EDIT: The chmod command probably needs to be chmod u+x filename and there is also a number system for chmod but I don't use it enough to be familiar. I'll read it and remember the convention for a couple of days, then it's gone;)
good point about building rpms, i think i will add that to my how-to, i doubt you need to set the suid bit on most progs so the u probably isnt necessary, and finally the number system is really easy to remember if you know how it is based. its just in this order
owner group other
and the numbers are based on binary in this order
read write execute
so
111=7 , 110=6 101=5
so with the perms 765
the owner can read write and execute the file
the group can read and write to the file
and all others can read and execute the file

u-noneinc-s
28th November 2006, 06:49 AM
Sorry Nickisgod1 but you just confused the h e double hockey sticks out of me. I've never seen the 111=7 , 110=6 101=5.
I remember 1=r 2=w 4=x so to take it farther 3=rw 5=rx 6=wx 7=rwx (on a "per ugo" basis so that 777 would be rwxrwxrwx or ugo+rwx
Is this also correct? I find this formula semi easy to remember, but it doesn't just come to me. I have to think about it.

nick.stumpos
28th November 2006, 07:05 AM
yup thats corect the 111 is just the binary representaion
001=1
010=2
011=3
100=4
101=5
110=6
111=7

u-noneinc-s
28th November 2006, 07:14 AM
Thanks, now it makes more sense. Gotta save that away somewhere.

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